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Emergency Climate Science Summit Convenes in Copenhagen

Richard Levangie | Tuesday March 10th, 2009 | 6 Comments

copenhagen-mermaid.jpg

Politicians aren’t listening, so climate scientists have convened an emergency meeting in Copenhagen over the next three days to collate the latest scientific findings so they can exert pressure on the negotiating teams that will meet in Copenhagen next December. The International Scientific Congress on Climate Change will feature keynotes by leading advocates for dramatic global warming policies, as well as a who’s who of climate scientists.
Several well-known universities are organizing the ISCCC to address outstanding issues leading up to the UN-sponsored climate summit, including the likely costs of inaction, and the threat to global security and world poverty posed by dramatic climate change.


The real concern now being voiced by the majority of climate scientists is that the UN IPCC Fourth Assessment Report is already out-of-date. Recent studies suggest that the pace of climate disruption has quickened, so that we may already be too late to stop changes that scientists warned of just five years ago. In fact, the most recent IPCC report failed to adequately account for several climatic tipping points ― like methane released from a thawing tundra, and decreased albedo from a melting arctic ― which are happening earlier than predicted. The concern now is that climate change could accelerate so quickly that humanity will unable to slow the outcome.
The conference will synthesize the latest climate change science and publish a master document for negotiators heading to Copenhagen in December.
Katherine Richardson, a marine biologist at the University of Copenhagen, said the synthesis would make direct calls on policy-makers to respond. “This is not a regular scientific conference,” she says. “This is a deliberate attempt to influence policy.”
Dr. Richardson’s quote could become fodder for the Rush Limbaughs of the world, who contend that climate change is a hoax perpetrated by climatologists greedy for research funding, but I’m impressed that a scientist would lay it on the line in such vivid and concrete terms.
With the scientists stepping up the pressure on negotiators, and President Obama and the Senate leadership both taking concrete steps toward a cap-and-trade system in the U.S, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December promises to be a dramatic departure from recent history. We’ll be following events this week as the reports come out, fast and furious.


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  • http://www.globalwarmingisreal.com Tom

    Good post Richard. I participated in an Earthwatch expedition last year to the Canadian Arctic to help study permafrost conditions along the Arctic/sub-Arctic transition zone.
    The lead scientist, Peter Kershaw, has been studying the areas since the ’70′s. There is no question in his mind that enough isn’t being done to mitigate and adapt to a rapidly changing climate. I certainly hope the work in Copenhagen can help light a fire, as it were, under policy-makers. We have squandered the past decade and there is no time to lose.

  • http://www.one-blue-marble.com Richard Levangie

    Thanks, Tom!

    Have you ever argued with someone who thinks global warming is just a big hoax, and he or she gives you the line about ice cubes melting in a glass a water when you mention that Greenland is melting…

    I’ve had that happen twice so far this year. We have such a long way to go.

  • oleterney

    Katherine Richardson, a marine biologist at the University of Copenhagen, and chairman of the Danish climate commission said 9th December 2009 at the COP15 Peoples Climate Summit:

    The climate debate is like the Darwin debate: “Both debates are about how humans think about themselves. In the case of Darwin it was, ‘Can we really just be another species and may be decended from ape?’, and in this case it is ‘Can human beings, as small and insignificant as we are, really have an impact on something as huge as the Earth and the way it works?’ “

    “In both cases we are challenging what the vast majority of society actually believes is an economic pillar of the time. In the case of Darwin most of the people in power believed that economic growth was not possible without slave trade. When you come with an argument that we are all the same family and we are selling our brothers it kind of undermines slavery. That was one of the big problems in terms of social acceptance. And obviously we know that climate science is challenging the economic belief that you cannot have growth without fossil fuels as a source of energy”.

    Look at the video (link)

  • oleterney
  • oleterney

    Katherine Richardson, a marine biologist at the University of Copenhagen, and chairman of the Danish climate commission said 9th December 2009 at the COP15 Peoples Climate Summit:

    The climate debate is like the Darwin debate: “Both debates are about how humans think about themselves. In the case of Darwin it was, ‘Can we really just be another species and may be decended from ape?’, and in this case it is ‘Can human beings, as small and insignificant as we are, really have an impact on something as huge as the Earth and the way it works?’ “

    “In both cases we are challenging what the vast majority of society actually believes is an economic pillar of the time. In the case of Darwin most of the people in power believed that economic growth was not possible without slave trade. When you come with an argument that we are all the same family and we are selling our brothers it kind of undermines slavery. That was one of the big problems in terms of social acceptance. And obviously we know that climate science is challenging the economic belief that you cannot have growth without fossil fuels as a source of energy”.

    Look at the video (link)

  • oleterney