The Vetrazzo Process: A Photo Essay

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Earlier this month, Mary Catherine O’Connor visited the Ford Point “Green Manufacturing facility” and, among other innovative companies, spent some time with Vetrazzo, a maker of stylish, recycled surfaces such as countertops.
Vetrazzo’s final products are approximately 85% (by weight) recycled glass from a variety of post-consumer and post-industrial sources. We thought you might like a closer look at the manufacturing process in the form of a photo essay. Read on to see…


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Freelance writer Mary Catherine O'Connor finds that a growing number of companies are proving the ways that they can make good financially, socially and environmentally (as the triple bottom line theory suggests).With that in mind, she contributes to Triple Pundit, as well as to Earth2Tech and other pubs focused on sustainability. She also writes The Good Route, an Outside Magazine blog that addresses the intersection of sustainability and the active/outdoor life.To find out more, or to reach her, go to www.mcoconnor.com.

3 responses

  1. This is really cool stuff. I saw a similar composite material used in the Green+WIRED Smart Home in Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry for the kitchen counters. I was super impressed!

  2. Super cool essay – how about a manufacturing facility in Detroit? God knows they have the space and certainly need the jobs! But is that city too corrupt to work?

  3. Rinato was used to make the countertops for the Smart Home at the Museum of Science and Industry. My company fabricated and installed them. (Blue Pearl Stone Technologies) Rinato is made in Wisconsin and qualifies for LEED Points for Chicagon Area residents. Vetrazzo is beautiful and totally green. We carry both products.

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