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Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Sources Up 12% in 1st Quarter

Thomas Schueneman | Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 0 Comments

In it’s Electric Power Monthly report released Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) states that non-hydro renewable energy expansion continues to clip along with double-digit growth.

Compared with the first quarter of 2008, the EIA reports that electrical generation from all renewable sources increased 7.2% in the first quarter of 2009, accounting for 10% of the nation’s electricity production. Conventional hydro power increased 4.6% while all other sources of renewables (biomass, wind, geothermal, and solar) rose by 12.4%

In just the month of March ’09 alone, renewables accounted for 10.9% of net electrical generation in the U.S. (conventional hydro providing 6.9% of that total and all other renewable sources about 4%). Of particular note is wind power, with net generation some 38.5% higher in March ’09 than in March ’08

Conversely, use of coal and natural gas has plummeted, while nuclear power generation remaining essentially stagnant. Net electrical generation from all sources dropped 4.3% in March ’09 compared with March ’08, the eighth consecutive month of decline when compared with the same calendar month of the previous year. Coal generation dropped 15.3%.

“Apologists for the nuclear and fossil fuel industries persist in trying to mislead the public by repeatedly spreading the myth that renewables account for only a tiny fraction of U.S. electricity production,” said Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign. “However, the hard numbers document the continuing dramatic growth in renewable energy’s already-significant contribution to the nation’s electricity supply – a contribution that will eventually leave coal and nuclear behind in the dust.”


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Categorized: Renewable Energy|

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