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Liberty Mutual Responsibility Project Conjures Laughs AND Consciousness

| Thursday November 5th, 2009 | 1 Comment

hollywood & green
liberty-mutual-RPI haven’t been blogging too much ’round these parts lately, mostly because I’ve been busy creating the types of videos and films I’m about to feature, but Liberty Mutual’s latest short, “Good Vibrations” made me stop in my tracks so I decided to make the time to share it with all of you. (No need to thank me.)

It’s part of their Responsibility Project to get consumers to act more responsibly. Obviously, it serves an insurance company well to have responsible policy holders, but if you look deeper, you’ll realize that these messages, ensconced in entertainment, actually serve the greater good, too.

The video below had me positively riveted for the full four minutes, a mix of that awkward laughter that unexpectedly bursts out when someone trips and the cringe of the inevitable guilt that follows. It’s funny and sweet, and leaves you newly inspired to keep the karmic flow of the universe going.

The idea for the project was sparked back in 2006 by this commercial, featuring people doing things for strangers. The ads generated an outpouring of response from viewers who were moved by the sentiment of the ads, no doubt also translating that goodwill back to Liberty Mutual. So, they decided that if one TV spot could get people thinking and talking about responsibility in a positive way, imagine what they could achieve if they built a whole community around doing the right thing.

So, the Responsibility Project was born to keep the momentum going, and spotlight the importance of paying it forward, even in a sometimes thankless world, as this below short film, “Dave Knoll Finds His Soul,” directed by Milo Ventimiglia and featuring fellow Heroes‘ co-star, Masi Oka , beautifully depicts.

You’re probably wondering why I’m embedding all these videos. Well, as I’m sure you can see, there’s something inherently human about the campaign, an element that’s difficult to capture in branded communications, and a face that very few companies put out there. But for a cause marketing campaign or CSR strategy to take root and create change, it must be authentic and relatable, and connect with you beyond the dollars and cents of acting sustainably. It needs to reach people in their everyday lives and show the tangible impact that even their simplest actions can make.

Do I believe an initiative like this benefits the brand? Absolutely. Will it likely lead to more Liberty Mutual policies? Most definitely. But that doesn’t negate the fact that this campaign is hinged on doing good, so even those viewers who may never purchase a Liberty Mutual policy are positively affected by it.

This is one of the main reasons I think entertainment-oriented campaigns are so compelling. It makes complex environmental and social issues accessible for the masses, and puts it in an emotional context that touches them on a much deeper level than a sustainability report or list of green facts ever could. And it’s emotion that ultimately drives adoption and action. So, I hope to see more companies enter this space, using multimedia to communicate meaningfully with consumers, and proving as Liberty Mutual has done, that lending a helping hand is indeed contagious.


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  • S Trend

    I’d like to make a comment on, “Good Vibrations – The Responsibility Project” With regard to Liberty Mutual and keeping the karmic flow of the universe going, if only Liberty Mutual would have to endure a small percentage of what they have made bonifide injured workers go through.

    My comment on the video is:
    If this short video is to portray employees at Liberty Mutual (within the office building) it sure looks to me as if they are laughing at others misfortunes. How true this is, with respect to Liberty Mutuals taking responsibility when it comes to workers compensation claims of? an injured worker. You protect your customer all right. Take the money for premiums, but don’t pay the claims for the injured worker. Responsibility? Do the right thing? BUSTED!