Bottled Water Bad. Reusable Bottle Good. Tap Water Gross. 321 Water Fixes That, Beautifully

More articles on the controversy surrounding bottled water can be found here!

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Is bottled water bad? You probably by now know that the plastics that go into bottled water are bad for the environment, and perhaps even not so good for you if it’s just nicely labeled tap water. Add to that the possibility the bottle contains BPA and they’re not such a healthy choice after all. And yet, they’re so convenient and obtainable anywhere. And drinking your local tap water? Not going to happen.

If you add into the equation that you’re not even close to hippie, and don’t want to look like one, your healthy, sustainable water choices get slim.

Australian startup Half a Teaspoon has designed a product to answer all these concerns, in a design-, environment- and people-friendly  product: 321 Water.Half a Teaspoon is taking a pragmatic, 2010 approach to launching it, starting production only once 10,000 bottles been ordered.

While being economically sensible, this has the additional benefit of the likely word of mouth marketing from those who’ve placed an order, since it’s in their interest to get others to order as well, so they can get their bottle.

What’s so special about it? The design combines practicality and unique looks, with a coffee press style plunger with a water filter at the bottom, the whole thing looking much like a vertical splash of  water caught mid stream.

The bottle is BPA-free and the filter is replaceable, lasting 100 uses. It’s clear Half a Teaspoon takes its commitment to making a fully sustainable product seriously, seeing as each component can be obtained individually for replacement, rather than one problem area rendering the whole bottle unusable.

All sounding good, but my thought is, will those less motivated to take an active hand in their water consumption choices be disinclined to replace the filter when needed, an activity they’ll need to do several times over the bottle’s lifetime?

Nonetheless, giving people the option to be able to refill their water bottles anywhere, and being able to quickly and easily clean it–in an attractive, environmentally sensitive package at a competitive price–is something that has a good chance of succeeding, particularly in Australia, where water is a precious resource.

Readers: What other creative water conservation products and initiatives are you seeing out there that are reaching out to the less “deep green” among us? What’s your take on the 321 Water bottle? Will it succeed? Does the model need tweaking?

Paul Smith is a sustainable business innovator, the founder of GreenSmith Consulting, and has an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. He creates interest in, conversations around, and business for green (and greening) companies, via social media.

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Is bottled water bad? Read more here.

Paul Smith is a sustainable business innovator, the founder of GreenSmith Consulting, and has an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. He creates interest in, conversations about, and business for green (and greening) companies, via social media marketing. || ==> For more, see GreenSmithConsulting.com