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Project H: Design for Healthy, Happy People and Habitats

Mary Catherine O'Connor | Wednesday January 20th, 2010 | 7 Comments

Project H Design is a collective of designers who believe in the power of good design to change the world. Founded last year by architect and designer (and former Inhabitat.com managing editor) Emily Pilloton, the non-profit will kick off it its Design Revolution Road Show in February. During this tour, the crew will haul an Airstream trailer carrying an exhibit that features 40 different products aimed at addressing specific–and often humanitarian–issues, such as the need to easily transport and purify water, or the need for effective, low-cost eyeglasses.

The tour will hit 12 US states and 25 high schools and university design programs and was sprung from Pilloton’s book, Design Revolution: 100 Products that Empower People, which was published late last year.

If you’re already well versed in sustainable design and appropriate technology, you’ll likely recognize many of the products featured in the exhibition, such as the OLPC computer or the Lifestraw. But by bringing these products and the design ethos behind them to budding designers around the country, Project H Design just might plant seeds for important future innovations. It may also teach these students that the gains they’ll achieve through their work won’t just be monetary, and that they have tremendous potential, as designers, to help solve social and environmental problems around the world.

As Pilloton remarked on The Colbert Report Monday night (see clip below), in response to Steve Colbert cracking wise about the not-so-lucrative nature of designing products for humanitarian uses:

We like to measure this as the triple bottom line, so it’s people, planet and profit.

The Colbert Report Mon – Thurs 11:30pm / 10:30c
Emily Pilloton
www.colbertnation.com
Colbert Report Full Episodes Political Humor Economy

Hat tip to Good.

PS: In case you were wondering: that fabulous Airstream will be hauled by a biodiesel-powered truck.

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  • http://www.triplepundit.com/ Jen Boynton

    What do we need to do to get Nick on Colbert?

  • pattibressman

    Love this book! How do we get Project H to come to our event on April 20th: Students for a Sustainable Future EXPO from the Children's Environmental Literacy Foundation? Hosted annually by Pace University (Pleasantville NY), we bring together middle and high school students from throughout the region to inspire them just as Emily and Project H are doing on Colbert and across the nation…
    Wouldn't it be wonderful if these design concepts were part of a required class in school?

    • mcoc

      @pattibressman: indeed, it would. i'll try to pass your request onto the Project H folks. thanks!

      • mcoc

        Thanks for responding, Emily!

    • http://www.projecthdesign.org/ Emily Pilloton

      Hi Patti!
      Thanks for your interest in our road show. I'm so sorry to tell you though that our road show ends April 17th and we have to be back in North Carolina just days after. One way we may be able to help though is by providing you with our educational toolkit if you're interested? It's a 13-point “how to” for design for social impact- and you can download it here: http://bit.ly/7T1aev

      Thanks again

  • http://www.projecthdesign.org/ Emily Pilloton

    Hi Patti!
    Thanks for your interest in our road show. I'm so sorry to tell you though that our road show ends April 17th and we have to be back in North Carolina just days after. One way we may be able to help though is by providing you with our educational toolkit if you're interested? It's a 13-point “how to” for design for social impact- and you can download it here: http://bit.ly/7T1aev

    Thanks again

  • mcoc

    Thanks for responding, Emily!

  • Pingback: Project H: Design for Healthy, Happy People and Habitats « Edge of Tomorrow

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