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Smart Elevators Bring You There Faster & More Efficiently

| Wednesday April 28th, 2010 | 7 Comments

If you’ve ever worked in a large office building you know the rare satisfaction that comes when the elevator is sitting there waiting for you and takes you non-stop to your floor. Likewise, you may know the frustration when the elevator stops 10 times before getting you where you need to be. Leave it to German engineering to address the problem with a fantastic type of intelligent elevator — a technology that’s starting to surface in some innovative new buildings.

We visited two high rise bank buildings in Frankfurt during last week’s green building trip (organized by the Ecologic Institute). I talked a little about the LEED platinum Deutsche Bank redevelopment, and I’ll be doing a post soon on KFW bankengruppe and its brand new building, as well. Both buildings feature new smart elevator systems by Schindler, which are almost as fun to ride as the paternosters we discovered elsewhere. ThyssenKrupp and Otis offer similar technology as well, but we’ll focus on Schindler’s technology here.

Here’s how it works:

When you walk into the building’s lobby, you enter your destination floor on a keypad as you approach a bank of elevators. The keypad instantly assigns you to the elevator that will get you most quickly to your floor. It’s all based on clustering groups of people who have the same, or very similar, destinations. The system also works in the other direction, letting full elevators skip floors and minimizing stops on the way down. By clustering riders, random cramming into the first available car is eliminated.

Not only do the elevators get you to your floor faster with less waiting, but the system saves energy and equipment wear by minimizing empty trips – though it’s not stated exactly how much. If you want to get really fancy, the Schindler system is able to identify employees by their ID badges so they don’t even need to press buttons upon entering the building.

smart elevators

In the United States, at least two recent buildings feature the system: The Wells Fargo building in Denver and the Hearst Tower in New York.

As with most German engineering, things can get complicated. Schindler even provides a handy “pocket guide” (PDF here) with more details about riding elevators than you ever thought you might need. Meanwhile, I’ll have to be content with my circa 1930 cage elevator. Nostalgia has it’s value too.

[PDF with more information]


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Categorized: Green Building|

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  • timgnatek

    My building (388 Market St., SF) was just upgraded to this system as well. People seem to be taking to it just fine. There are some quirks – there are no buttons inside the elevators, meaning that if you mistakenly step into the wrong elevator, you'll have to exit on a floor and re-key your destination. And it feels like there's a longer lag time to catch an elevator than before the upgrade. But I'm happy that they've made this move towards efficiency.

  • choppen5

    1 California has these. Work great…

  • http://www.HowleyGreenEnergy.com/ John Howley

    I haven't seen any yet in NYC, but there are several of these elevator systems in the Philippines. They were a bit disorienting when I visited the first building, but the people who work in the buildings seem to have caught on quickly.

  • http://www.HowleyGreenEnergy.com/ John Howley

    I haven't seen any yet in NYC, but there are several of these elevator systems in the Philippines. They were a bit disorienting when I visited the first building, but the people who work in the buildings seem to have caught on quickly.

  • http://www.theporttechnology.com Christian Sprenger

    IN NYC are couple of destination dispatch installations.
    Marriot Marquis (Time Square) for instance. If you want to know more contact me or visit http://www.theporttechnology.com for the newest cuttion edge technology.

  • Chen

    I know two of the buildings near my area use the “destination dispatch” elevators. They’re definitely more convenient than the traditional elevators. In one of the office buildings in Seattle, the security guard talked to me about the benefits of those “destination dispatch” elevators. They can definitely save energy and reduce the trip times for passengers.

    I hope the tall office buildings and hotel buildings will eventually switch over to the “destination dispatch” elevators. :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/jaymietreadwell Jaymie Treadwell

    Sydney, Australia has at least 2 buildings with Schindler Miconic 10 – MetCentre being one of them – see my videos of them and many more at youtube.com/user/jaymietreadwell

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