Vote Here: Where in Africa Would You Invest?

By David Abraham

Two people are sent by their company to a poor and dusty country.  When they return, they report separately to the same supervisor.  “Well, what did you find?” asks the manager of his first employee.  “Sir, the people there don’t even have shoes.  The place is just too poor for us to bother with.”  The second employee is later asked the same question and replies: “Boss, everyone’s walking around barefoot.  How soon can we ship shoes!?”

Don’t be too alarmed at my bad taste, I heard this [bad] joke from a Nigerian venture capitalist as he explained the business growth opportunities that are cropping up in places like Sierra Leone and Liberia.  So, with the first African World Cup upon us, leave your comment below to tell us where on the Continent you would put your money and why.

The posts on this page are contributed by students from the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business in conjunction with the newly launched Center for Social Value Creation. The center's mission is to develop leaders with a deep sense of individual responsibility and the knowledge to use business as a vehicle for social change. These posts are a way to continue the dialogue outside of the classroom and share the viewpoints of Smith students on the challenges and opportunities of triple bottom line thinking.

3 responses

  1. E+Co has substantial investments in Africa as there is a huge underserved market there for clean energy products in off-grid communities. E+Co offers loans and enterprise development services to entrepreneurs looking to bring solar lighting, improved cookstoves, LPG distribution and other technologies to people in countries like Ghana, Tanzania and Senegal among others. http://eandco.net/investments

  2. Anywhere you can trust people and the political situation seems like a viable investment right now all across the continent. The problem is things are so insanely corrupt and the culture so profoundly uneducated that people are afraid, understandably, to take big risks. I'd guess the best bet is in some kind of microfinance that generates small enterprise…

  3. Anywhere you can trust people and the political situation seems like a viable investment right now all across the continent. The problem is things are so insanely corrupt and the culture so profoundly uneducated that people are afraid, understandably, to take big risks. I'd guess the best bet is in some kind of microfinance that generates small enterprise…

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