B1G1: How To Make Your Business Card Stand Out, Usefully

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B1G1 Worlds First Giving Business Card Business cards. Try as we might to digitize the process of exchanging contact information, the ritual of exchanging business cards lives on. For many of us, we hand them out early and often, resulting in a pile of post conference cards sitting on our desk.

Unless you’ve got a sharp memory or had a sharp pen to write down mnemonics for when you’re back at the office, most of the cards end up a blur that gets tossed in the recycle bin. And the same thing happens to your card.

How can this be changed?

One interesting new answer is what B1G1 is calling “The world’s first giving business card.” Basically, B1G1 gives you graphics you can include on the back side of your business card that are a $1 voucher for the recipient to give towards the cause of their choice, with the option to give more. You can track who gave to what cause(s), thanking them for their generosity, and having an additional, deeper reason to connect.

This is a brilliant move, for many reasons:

It makes a clear, instantly differentiating statement about you, moving you into a different category than the hordes of post event fuzzy memories. And for B1G1, it’s an inexpensive way to introduce new people to their service, via an unpaid marketing force that’s giving them to people likely to at least mention it to friends and colleagues, if not make use of the offer.

How much can $1 do, really, you say? B1G1 cleverly got my attention when it said that 10 cents can build a house. (It buys a brick for a Habitat for Humanity house in India.) $10 provides an implant lens for those getting eye surgery in Indonesia.

So before you order your next batch of business cards, consider a simple, smart, beneficial addition to the back of it.

Readers: Have you used this service yet? What’s been the results, both in what was given and relationships you created as result? What other low cost/high benefit social venture programs that involve businesses/individuals have you seen lately that we should know about?

Paul Smith is a sustainable business innovator, the founder of GreenSmith Consulting, and has an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. He creates interest in, conversations about, and business for green (and greening) companies, via social media marketing.

Paul Smith is a sustainable business innovator, the founder of GreenSmith Consulting, and has an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. He creates interest in, conversations about, and business for green (and greening) companies, via social media marketing. || ==> For more, see GreenSmithConsulting.com