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Hydropower Expansion: The Hydropower Improvement Act of 2011

| Wednesday March 30th, 2011 | 1 Comment

On March 17, 2011, Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), introduced bipartisan legislation to accelerate hydropower projects and development across the country.  The Hydropower Improvement Act has a total of nine co-sponsors, including Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman, Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA).  The bill seeks to substantially increase U.S. hydropower capacity and support local job creation and economic opportunities.

According to Murkowski, the Hydropower Improvement Act of 2011 “achieves common sense regulatory reform, spurs economic growth and takes advantage of hydropower’s position as the country’s leading source of clean, renewable energy.”   Similarly, Senator Bingaman states that the “bill allows us to highlight the potential for development of additional hydropower resources in an environmentally responsible way.”  The bill includes provisions to address the potential for hydropower development from smaller sources that are available even in dry states like New Mexico.

“Additionally,” Bingaman states, “the bill emphasizes the need to improve efficiency at existing facilities and to tap into the hydropower potential at existing non-powered dams.”  Senator Cantwell adds, “This bipartisan bill will help find ways to increase our nation’s hydropower capacity without building new dams, improving air quality while creating new clean energy jobs.”

The bipartisan nature of this bill establishes hydropower as a major area of consensus on energy in the 112th congress.  In fact, according to National Hydropower Association (“NHA”) Executive Director, Linda Church Ciocci, “Hydropower has more multi-region and bipartisan support than any other clean energy technology… this bill recognizes the vital role of hydropower as an affordable, reliable, available, and sustainable domestic energy source.”

The NHA applauds the bill because it will advance project deployment (from conduit and small hydro to non-powered dams to pumped storage) by requiring better interagency coordination; through funding of competitive grants for increased production; and with continued support for research and development activities.  Additionally, as expressed by NHA President, Andrew Munro, this increase in hydropower development supports President Obama’s goal of attaining eighty percent of our nation’s electricity with clean energy.

The key provisions include:

  • Grant Program: Directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a competitive grants program to support efficiency improvements or capacity additions at existing hydropower facilities; adding generation to non-powered dams; addressing aging infrastructure; conduit projects; environmental studies; and environmental mitigation measures.
  • Non-powered Dams and Pumped Storage: Directs the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to explore a potential two-year licensing process for hydropower development at existing non-powered dams and closed-loop pumped storage projects.
  • Conduit and Small Hydro: Allows for conduit projects on federal lands and directs FERC and other federal agencies to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to better coordinate reviews of these projects. Requires regional workshops to reduce barriers and investigate improvements to the regulatory process for small hydro and conduit projects.
  • Federal Hydropower Development: Requires the Departments of Energy and Interior and the Army Corps of Engineers to report to Congress on the implementation of the March 24, 2010 MOU on increasing federal hydropower development. Also directs FERC and the Bureau of Reclamation (Bureau) to complete a new MOU to improve the coordination and timeliness of non-federal hydropower development at Bureau projects.
  • R&D Program: Requires DOE to develop and implement a plan to increase the nation’s use of hydropower through research, development, and demonstration initiatives.
  • Studies: Directs DOE to study pumped storage project opportunities on federal and non-federal lands near existing or potential sites of intermittent renewable resource development, and a Department study of hydropower potential from existing conduits. Directs the Bureau of Reclamation to study barriers to non-federal development at Bureau projects.

Local green job creation is also a primary focus of the Act.  According to NHA, a recent study has shown that with the right policies, hydropower could create over 1.4 million jobs by the year 2025.  That however remains to be seen.  Munro thinks the Act will “bolster the positive economic and job creation benefits of hydropower projects, supply chain companies and low-cost hydroelectricity in all fifty states.”    Also by the year 2025, NHA claims that growing hydropower could add an additional 60,000 MW to our nation’s energy capacity.

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Tripp Hall is a law student, outdoor enthusiast, and environmental advocate.

 


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  • chaganti

    Dear Tripp Hall

    this is really lovely to say Hydropower Expansion: The Hydropower Improvement Act of 2011 every thing is fantastic but hydro or any other natural source will never be a reality to get all the energy or electricity man needs on this lovely green planet. To begin with hydro power generation (dam,pump storage, run of the river etc) all put together in the entire world this just 20% that is all. Think of solar, wind etc they are also very little.
    Then the diabolic acts of fossil fuel is getting to a end in another 80 years and leave sorrow and misery to the entire world.
    What will the world do to fight back and come to a jet age when fossil fuels are completely over and all continents face one common problem called ELECTRICITY deficit or short of electricity.
    If seasons change and world clock gets altered then what is the solution?
    FOR ALL THIS PROBLEMS WHO IS RESPONSIBLE