3p Contributor: Alex Vietti

Alex Vietti Social Media & Communications Intern

Recent Articles

Living Progress: A Holistic Approach to Creating a Better Future

Alex Vietti
| Tuesday October 14th, 2014 | 0 Comments

This post is part of Triple Pundit’s ongoing coverage of the SXSW Eco conference. For the rest, please visit our SXSW Eco page here.

Chris Librie, senior director of strategy and communications for HP, speaks to a crowd at the HP Living Progress Exchange at SXSW Eco 2014.

Chris Librie, senior director of strategy and communications for HP, speaks to a crowd at the HP Living Progress Exchange at SXSW Eco 2014.

Living Progress is HP’s vision of creating a better future for everyone through innovation and technology. Chris Librie, senior director of strategy and communications for HP, shared some of the strategies and projects the company is involved in around the world on the last day of the SXSW Eco conference.

First, Librie dove into the immense realities of HP’s scope and impacts: It is virtually impossible to go a day without interacting with some kind of HP technology, whether it is by a credit transaction or social media activity. Today, more data is created in 12 hours than was created in all of human history up to 2003, and HP’s Public Cloud uses more energy than all of Japan. If lined up side-by-side, the 8 to 10 million additional servers needed to store this data over the next 3 years will require the space of Manhattan.

These realities not only drive the necessity to think holistically, but also demonstrate the high degree of responsibility that HP has to lead us all in a more sustainable direction. Recognizing these impacts has motivated the company to consider the triple bottom line, Librie continued, because its team knows business-as-usual is not sustainable. 

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Experts Discuss Tackling Big Problems Through Design at SXSW Eco

Alex Vietti
| Saturday October 11th, 2014 | 0 Comments

This post is part of Triple Pundit’s ongoing coverage of the SXSW Eco conference. For the rest, please visit our SXSW Eco page here.

Triple Pundit was one of hundreds of organizations to attend the annual SXSW Eco conference in Austin last week. This post is part of our ongoing coverage.

Triple Pundit was one of hundreds of organizations to attend the annual SXSW Eco conference in Austin last week. This post is part of our ongoing coverage.

On the first day of SXSW Eco, design experts discussed examples of how creative design makes sustainability easy, cost-effective and beautiful. Moderated by Vince Digneo, sustainability strategist for Adobe Systems, panelists from Frog Design, Building Robotics and Levi Strauss & Co. showcased their innovative approaches to solving problems while making their products, services and consumer experiences better.

Denise Gershbein explained Frog Design’s position: They help their customers with global production design that is long-term and systems focused. She explains that cradle-to-cradle and visionary thinking is at the root of their design consultations, and these are the most important attributes that lead the non-linear design process towards solving complex sustainability problems.

In my view, the most interesting component of the panel was Paul Dillinger’s deep dive into the sustainability-driven design tactics he leads at Levi Strauss. He began with the recognition that the fashion industry has a notoriously bad reputation for being highly wasteful and unsustainable, from the mostly unrecyclable materials through the environment-intense chemicals. This is a result of an industry that is primarily concerned with trend relevancy and valuing consumer needs over the bigger picture of eco-consciousness. There is a trend in ‘eco-fashion’ labels, but he notes that the design and marketing approaches they utilize often only address one issue of a very large and complex system, like focusing solely on the use of organic cotton.

He attributed this shortcoming in the fashion industry to the consideration of environmental constraints as barriers to creativity and freedom of design. But in fact, Dillinger, the company’s head of global production innovation, said he uses these as springboards for innovation and sustainability. He feels that the process of unlocking environmental and social qualities that can be built into pieces of clothing is actually more creatively rewarding, and he has seen firsthand how these attributes can create more business and consumer benefits.

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Recap of Twitter Chat: Inspiring Tomorrow’s Leaders with Raytheon

Alex Vietti
| Wednesday July 9th, 2014 | 0 Comments

 

947134_10151695745342340_1114553427_nHow does a company link community success to business success?  With the release of Raytheon’s 2013 Corporate Responsibility Report, we talked with Pam Wickham, vice president of Corporate Affairs and Communications for Raytheon, who provided her insight live on Twitter.

From sustainability to supporting its communities, the aerospace and defense technology company is making a tangible impact by aligning its corporate social responsibility initiatives to its business goals.

For instance, how does Raytheon attract world class talent to its ranks amid declining student interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)? What does the aerospace and defense industry’s aging workforce and shortage of technical talent mean to Raytheon’s future? What is the company doing to empower the millions of veterans returning to civilian life?

Storify Recap:

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