American Sustainable Business Council

The American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) is a network of companies and business associations. Its column, Policy Points, identifies public policies where a business voice, grounded in principles of innovation, fairness and environmental stewardship, can make an essential difference in the advocacy process. The goal is to arm readers with information and specific actions to take. As business leaders, we can and must support policy change to help make the economy more green and sustainable. The column editor is Richard Eidlin, ASBC's Vice President - Public Policy and Business Engagement.

Through tax inversion --

Policy Points: How Tax Inversions Hurt Smaller Businesses

Unfortunately, this Tax Day, some companies will shoulder a smaller tax burden than others — a few will have none at all. It makes absolutely zero sense. And it’s all legal. One way companies can get their bill down to zero is through the process of a tax inversion. Here, a U.S. company buys a foreign competitor, then reincorporates the new company in the foreign country, where tax burdens are lower. This sleight of hand can have very real consequences for businesses.

Protesters voice their opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership at a 2012 rally in Ashburn Junction, Virginia.

Policy Points: Net Neutrality, Sick Leave and Better Trade

A sustainable economy will depend on policies that will help advance change on a societal level. Here are three important policies that will help – and specific actions you can take.

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Policy Points: Three Signs of Hope from 2014

For a year that didn’t exactly inspire confidence in policy-making generally, 2014 was actually a better year for sustainable policy than one might think.

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The 2014 Elections and the Road for Sustainable Business

While many campaign ads tout a candidate’s economic bona fides, often the reality and the rhetoric don’t match up. That’s why the ASBC Action Fund decided to take a look at a few races across the country to see how effective the candidates’ proposed solutions might be.

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Policy Points: 5 Business Reasons for Raising the Minimum Wage

Recently I was asked, “Why do you support raising the minimum wage – aren’t all business people against it?” As a small business owner I care about running a profitable business. That means I also care about the local economy my business depends on.

Members of the West Virginia National Guard draw water samples to determine levels of contamination remaining in local water supply during Operation Elk River Spill.

Policy Points: Spilling Light on Poor Toxic Chemicals Regulations

Accidents like the Elk River chemical spill in West Virginia and Dan River coal ash spill in North Carolina shine a spotlight on the potential for damage from poorly regulated toxic chemicals. But, in fact, they only hint at how poor current regulations really are for these chemicals.

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Policy Points: Business Policies For a Sustainable Economy

A sustainable economy will depend on policies that will help advance change on a societal level. Here are three important policies that will help–and specific actions you can take.

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Policy Points: If Properly Managed, (Federal) Debt is Good

Debt is not always bad. It all depends on what it is used for and how it is managed. If the reasons and the goals are sound, debt can be good — really good. This is something business owners understand particularly well. For a business, the typical goal is increased profits down the road. But what are the right goals for federal debt?

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Policy Points: Policies for a Sustainable Workforce

A sustainable economy will depend on a sustainable workforce, one that is educated, adequately compensated and valued humanely. Here are three important policies that will help

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Policy Points: Renewable Chemicals Industry Reaches Economic Tipping Point

Wherever the first commercial renewable chemical facilities are built, feedstock supply and other infrastructure will soon follow, along with thousands of jobs. If all this happens outside the U.S, so will all of the economic opportunities that go with it. The tipping point is ours for now, but we must seize it now. Otherwise, it will soon be gone.