American Sustainable Business Council

The American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) is a network of companies and business associations. Its column, Policy Points, identifies public policies where a business voice, grounded in principles of innovation, fairness and environmental stewardship, can make an essential difference in the advocacy process. The goal is to arm readers with information and specific actions to take. As business leaders, we can and must support policy change to help make the economy more green and sustainable. The column editor is Richard Eidlin, ASBC's Vice President - Public Policy and Business Engagement.

Policy Points: Regulation Reform — Bad Solutions for the Wrong Problem

Small businesses do not resent good regulations. American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) polling has found that 86 percent believe that regulations are necessary and 93 percent believe their business can live with fair and manageable regulations. The problem is small businesses lack the resources to comply with complicated legislation.

Policy Points: How Business Can Address Healthcare, Regulations and Pay Equity

Now more than ever, business leaders must stand together and tell lawmakers that “what business wants” are policies that fully account for any enterprise’s costs (or “externalities”) to people and our planet. Here are three important policy initiatives for business to support now.

Policy Points: 5 Steps to Make Government Encourage Business as Force for Good

The incoming administration is looking to be “business-friendly.” But what about the needs of socially responsible businesses? If you strive to run your business in an environmentally and socially sustainable way, it’s time stand up for it in public and with policymakers. It’s time to become an activist for business as a force for good.

Taking Care of Business in the High-Road Economy

Raising the minimum wage. Guaranteeing paid family leave. Increasing employee ownership. “Banning the box” to give applicants who’ve served time a fair chance at a job. These widely different policies have one thing in common: They benefit not just the worker, but also the bottom line.

Come Together: Can Climate Be a Bipartisan Issue?

If you’ve followed elections long enough, you know basically what to expect in the general — sharply divergent views on everything from trade to taxes to foreign policy. But what if there were issues where both parties could actually agree on solutions? We don’t think this is too outlandish — in fact, when it comes to the environment, both parties have more in common than they think.

Policy Points: How to Make Businesses Family-Friendly, One State at a Time

With the presidential election only months away, Congress is expected to slow down even more than usual. And states may step up to fill the gap. That seems to be happening with the minimum wage, which picked up two state wins recently, and family-friendly policies such as paid time off to care for family members.

Policy Points: How Business Can Influence Paid Leave, Taxes and Climate Issues

By Zach Bernstein Voluntary corporate sustainability initiatives and social enterprises are essential but are not game-changers by themselves. In addition, we need laws and regulations that guide our economy toward sound, long-term decision-making, with full recognition of social and environmental externalities. As business leaders, we must support policy changes to help make the economy more … Continued

Policy Points: Is Chemical Reform Coming In the 2016 Congress?

As we move into the new year, one major question continues to emerge: In an election year, will Congress be able to pass anything? Somewhat surprisingly, though, there is one issue that Congress continues to move on, and which could yield modest gains for consumers and businesses alike.

Policy Points: Analyzing Paul Ryan’s Tax Agenda

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) taking the position as Speaker of the House is significant news, especially if you’ve been wondering when – if ever – the federal government will take on reforming the tax code. Speaker Ryan is probably as well-positioned for tax reform as any speaker ever. On some major points, however, he is off-target – and not taking a business-friendly approach to tax reform.