3p Contributor: Andrea Newell

Andrea Newell has more than ten years of experience designing, developing and writing ERP e-learning materials for large corporations in several industries. She was a consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and a contract consultant for companies like IBM, BP, Marathon Oil, Pfizer, and Steelcase, among others. She is a writer and former editor at TriplePundit. She has contributed to In Good Company (Vault's CSR blog), Evolved Employer, The Glass Hammer, EcoLocalizer and CSRwire. You can reach her at andrea.g.newell@gmail.com and @anewell3p on Twitter.

Recent Articles

Women in CSR: Meghna Tare, University of Texas at Arlington

| Thursday March 6th, 2014 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Tare - CopyTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Meghna Tare: I am the Director of Sustainability for University of Texas at Arlington. We have our own citizenry, nearly 35,000 students and more than 5,600 employees – as well as our own housing, businesses, transportation fleet and police force. Because the University’s main campus is in the heart of downtown Arlington, our growth is felt throughout the region. Since 2007, we have added 1.46 million square feet of building space to the campus.

I work collaboratively with faculty, staff, the student body and community members to address opportunities to promote sustainability in several areas including greening facility operations, promoting innovative research, supporting and encouraging student initiatives, implementing an environmentally and sustainability-focused curriculum, establishing community gardens and composting programs and sponsoring public service initiatives. I recommend policies and strategies to advance the university’s commitment to being leader in campus sustainability. I also work collaboratively and have established a working relationship with various stakeholders and agencies like EPA Region 6, North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), North Texas Commission, local governments, DFW Airport, United States Business Council for Sustainable Development (USBCSD), Chamber of Commerce, Community College Districts and other nonprofits.

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Mattel Missed a Big Opportunity with ‘Entrepreneur Barbie’

| Tuesday March 4th, 2014 | 0 Comments

barbie biggerBarbie recently started the latest of 150+ careers: Entrepreneur Barbie. It’s a timely topic because female entrepreneurship has been growing exponentially in the past several years, but Mattel sticks to their formula Barbie and misses a great opportunity to branch out and really inspire young girls.

With Entrepreneur Barbie, Mattel had a chance to show more than one image of a female business owner–but stayed with generic Barbie. Mattel reported that Barbie sales have been steadily falling in recent years (Barbie revenue was down 40 percent in the U.S. in 2012), and this would have been a way to show that Barbie was adapting to a new reality, one where girls see more realistic role models. Many women who start their own businesses are older, experienced businesswomen, or moms with a unique idea, or both, along with a dozen other iterations besides a shiny, plastic businesswoman. The description of the doll gives no specifics about Barbie’s business, except that she has all the latest toys (her business must be well-funded).

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Women in CSR: Dr. Jeana Wirtenberg, Transitioning to Green

| Thursday February 27th, 2014 | 5 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Wirtenberg pic10TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Dr. Jeana Wirtenberg: I am the CEO of Transitioning to Green. When companies, and other types of organizations, want to move sustainability programs forward, my job is to provide them with tools to do so. They often need models for taking action and strategies for catalyzing culture change. People driving this change can get stuck. I help them avoid that or, if they’re already stuck my job is to get them unstuck. That’s what we do at Transitioning to Green.

We also have a nonprofit arm, which I lead. In that role, I help people find their place and career in the green economy. We work with displaced professionals, veterans, and others.

In addition, I’m an author, professor, and researcher. My new book, just out, is called Building a Culture for Sustainability: People, Planet, and Profits in a New Green Economy. I teach in the Bard MBA in Sustainability program and I consult with the Institute for Sustainable Enterprise, which I founded, at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

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Women in CSR: Tina Morefield, DIRECTV

| Thursday February 20th, 2014 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Tina Morefield-Head S#7A86ATriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Tina Morefield: As Director of Corporate Citizenship for DIRECTV, one of the world’s leading providers of digital television entertainment services, I lead our U.S. strategy for community outreach and charitable giving, which is focused on K-12 schools and STEM education, as well as employee volunteerism. In addition, my team produces DIRECTV’s annual report on Corporate Social Responsibility, which communicates the company’s Corporate Citizenship, environmental sustainability and people initiatives, and is aligned with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework.

I joined DIRECTV 15 years ago, starting my career in corporate communications. In 2004, I added responsibility for Corporate Citizenship and led a combined Communications & Corporate Citizenship team for seven years before focusing solely on Corporate Citizenship in 2011.

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Women in CSR: Aman Singh, CSRwire

| Thursday February 13th, 2014 | 13 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

AmanSingh_newpicTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Aman Singh: I am the Editorial Director at CSRwire. I lead content distribution, social media strategy – for clients and our own – CSR/sustainability reporting services and other editorial functions, including managing CSRwire’s commentary section Talkback. I have worked with Fortune 500 companies as well as the country’s leading nonprofits and academic institutions on creating and implementing communication strategies focused on stakeholder engagement and behavior change, including Unilever, Verizon, SAP, ARAMARK, Campbell Soup, Sodexo, EarthShare, Points of Light and others.

I am a student of journalism and started my career right after graduating from high school at Tehelka, a website based out of New Delhi, India, that at that time was known for its investigatory exposes and cutting-edge reporting. Along the way, I’ve worked at myriad outlets including ABC News, The Villager, Downtown Express and The Wall Street Journal. So I’ve been in the “business of writing and editing” for over 15 years. But I turned my focus to CSR and sustainability during the 2008 recession when things were crumbling around us economically and responsibility – both corporate and personal – seemed in short supply. Since then I have written for numerous publications including Forbes, Bloomberg, CNBC, The Vault, Greenbiz, and TriplePundit.

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Women in CSR: Nichole Lecher, Northwestern Mutual

| Thursday February 6th, 2014 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

NL_professionalshotTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Nichole Lecher: I am proud to serve as the director of strategic philanthropy and community relations at Northwestern Mutual. My work with the Northwestern Mutual Foundation drives sustainable social impact in the communities in which our employees and financial representatives live and work.

Two years ago, I came to the Northwestern Mutual Foundation to spearhead the strategic development and launch of the Childhood Cancer Program, our first-ever national signature initiative. Our program is dedicated to accelerate the search for a cure to childhood cancer and to provide support to kids and families facing the daily struggles of this disease. In just two years, we have brought this program to more than 10,000 Northwestern Mutual financial representatives and staff, as well as 5,000 employees at our corporate headquarters in Milwaukee.

In addition, my work includes oversight of the Foundation’s strategy, operations and other relationships with key nonprofit partners.

3p: How has the CSR program evolved at your company?

NL: Northwestern Mutual has always had a “do what’s right” ethos, which was applied in all areas of our business and community relationships.

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Women in CSR: Tonie Hansen, NVIDIA

| Thursday January 30th, 2014 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Tonie_HansenTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Tonie Hansen:  I’m the Director of Global Citizenship at NVIDIA, where I’ve spent the past eight years, all focused on sustainability. Previously, I spent 15 years in marketing roles, largely at IT startups.

I was hired at NVIDIA to lead philanthropy and needed to build up expertise quickly. So, I immersed myself in conferences, learning about the larger concept of sustainability. Instantly, I got hooked. It seemed like a great way to merge my background in business with my desire to have an impact.  Within a year or so, I helped assemble our first green team and we worked together to develop goals around reducing NVIDIA’s greenhouse gas levels. And in the intervening years, I’ve added sustainability responsibilities to my role, as I saw it becoming more relevant to our business. I’m about to begin work on our fifth sustainability report, and have been getting deeply engaged in our supplier responsibility efforts since joining the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition’s board of directors.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

TH: Our efforts began about eight years ago when we found ourselves responding to a growing number of government and customer requests to comply with sustainability initiatives. Frankly, this helped raise our own institutional consciousness of the issue, and we decided to start reporting as a best practice in 2010. By 2012, we made it to #6 on the Newsweek Greenest Companies list.

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Women in CSR: Cindy Drucker, Weber Shandwick

| Thursday January 23rd, 2014 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Cindy DruckerTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Cindy Drucker: Weber Shandwick provides strategic communications and public affairs services, with a specialty in sustainability and social responsibility for clients in the nonprofit, foundation, and corporate sector. I am an Executive Vice President with Weber Shandwick’s Social Impact practice where I lead our global sustainability offering. In this role, I partner with our Weber Shandwick teams around the world to help our clients navigate the complexities of the sustainability landscape through innovative leadership initiatives, unique collaborations, positive stakeholder engagement and effective communications and public affairs strategies.

I’ve worked in the sustainability arena for 22 years – starting in 1992 when it was called “green marketing” and most of the issues were around advancing single environmental attributes such as recycling and recycled content. Today, I’m able to use the insights learned through my prior positions as head of global sustainability for SC Johnson, senior advisor to the president/CEO of World Wildlife Fund and director of stakeholder engagement for the Presidential Oil Spill Commission to build multi-stakeholder initiatives for Weber Shandwick clients that advance a more sustainable future, create shared value, and build reputation capital.

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Women in CSR: Kathy Hannan, KPMG

| Thursday January 16th, 2014 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

KPMG: Kathy Hannan. Tax department. Photo by Andrew Collings.TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Kathy Hannan: I am the National Managing Partner, Diversity and Corporate Responsibility. I began my career at KPMG in 1985 and was admitted to the partnership in 1994 in the international corporate services practice. In 1996, I was promoted to Midwest Partner-in-Charge of International Services, and Partner-in-Charge of KPMG’s Chicago Metro-Tax practice in 1998. In 2000, I was appointed to the role of Vice Chair, Human Resources, and in 2004, I was named the Midwest Area Managing Partner of Tax Services – the first female to receive such a position at KPMG.

In 2009, I was appointed to my current role as National Managing Partner, Diversity and Corporate Responsibility, in which I provide the strategic direction to leverage philanthropic partnerships, stakeholder engagement, environmental best practices, and diversity objectives with the firm’s strategy for long-term enterprise sustainability.  I also serve as the global lead partner on several of the firm’s priority accounts.

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Women in CSR: Nikki Korn, Cause Consulting

| Thursday January 9th, 2014 | 3 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Nikki Korn HeadshotTriplePundit: Name and title. Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Nikki Korn: I am the Principal of Cause Consulting. I am lucky to be able to co-lead a strategy firm committed to helping companies and nonprofits simultaneously strengthen business and impact society. Every day I am inspired by my work coaching organizations on how to be intentional and strategic in their approach to CSR and sustainability. With some clients just beginning their CSR journeys, and others charting new territory, together, we get to cause change.

Over the past 20 years in this rapidly evolving field, I have sought out new ways to integrate my passion for social issues, communities, and marketing communications. From Washington, DC-based public affairs and foundation consulting, to product marketing, and then to cause and corporate responsibility, I am having a ball.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

NK: We launched our firm with the belief that it does not matter what a company calls it – sustainability, corporate responsibility, CSR – as long as it has a shared vision and common language to set goals, develop strategies, and cause change. Today, ten years later, in a CSR field that is increasingly sophisticated and diverse, this intentional approach is more important than ever. Thus, at our firm, we are looking for new ways to take action, communicate, and inspire.  We are aligning around the power of shared purpose and values; enhancing brands to unify the diverse elements of CSR; and harnessing storytelling and visuals to mobilize stakeholders.

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Women in CSR: Tessie Topol, Time Warner Cable

| Thursday January 2nd, 2014 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

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TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Tessie Topol: I am Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) at Time Warner Cable (TWC), the nation’s second largest cable provider. I am responsible for building TWC’s CSR strategy – overseeing its execution and integration company-wide and communicating its evolution and progress to both internal and external audiences.  As part of that charge, I lead TWC’s signature philanthropic initiative, Connect a Million Minds (CAMM), a five-year, $100 million dollar program to inspire young people to pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers.

I joined TWC in 2008 following two and a half years at MTV, where I was Director of Strategic Partnerships & Public Affairs. Prior to that, I spent almost 10 years in the non-profit and government sectors.

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Women in CSR: Donna Sockell, University of Colorado

| Thursday December 19th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Donna_Sockell5GATriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Donna Sockell: I am the former executive director and founder, Center for Education on Social Responsibility (CESR), Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado-Boulder and current head of the “Curriculum Think Tank,” a consortium of business schools working together to improve ethics and social responsibility education.

As CESR’s executive director, I saw my responsibility as enabling students to discover their values and to learn how to really live them in their professional and personal lives. When I started at CESR, I determined that’s what a business school-based corporate social responsibility center should do. That’s a different approach than is typically taken by ethics and social responsibility departments in business schools.

Changing a paradigm and building a program gives you a different role than stepping into a position of carrying forward established policies. A big part of my job was to get superb people in place who could be credible, expert values-discovery facilitators and outstanding teachers in the traditional sense at the same time. Shifting a paradigm also poses big challenges inside an organization. So my other big job was to try to make the environment in which those people operated – the university, academic, business school setting – to be as supportive and fertile as possible.

There are strong parallels to corporate environments. Established CSR departments do amazing things. I would love to see them partner more with the HR, training, and development parts of their companies and that would dramatically compound their reach and impact.

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Women in CSR: Karin Kreider, ISEAL Alliance

| Tuesday December 10th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Karin New England spring candid shotTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Karin Kreider: I am the Executive Director of ISEAL Alliance. I lead the overall strategic direction of this membership association for sustainability standards systems.  I’ve been working in the field of social and environmental standard-setting and certification for more than 20 years.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

KK: ISEAL has been around for 10 years but several of our members (groups like Fairtrade, Rainforest Alliance, the Marine Stewardship Council, etc.) have been around 15, 25, or even 30 years.  In the early days, when these groups came together to form the ISEAL Alliance, we spent a lot of time defining what was good practice for a standards system.  Today we have become a platform for deep collaboration, and a catalyst for the entire certification and standards movement. Now, we talk about new ways to go to scale or how to demonstrate the impacts of certification in emerging economies.

3p: Tell us about someone (mentor, sponsor, friend, hero) who affected your sustainability journey, and how.

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Women in CSR: Meghan Chapple-Brown, George Washington University

| Thursday December 5th, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

meghan chapplebrownTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Meghan Chapple-Brown: I am the Director for the Office of Sustainability at George Washington University and also Senior Advisor on University Sustainability Initiatives, which means I work with GW’s Trustees, President, Provost, Treasurer, faculty, students, and staff in Facilities, Procurement, Investment, and Development to make GW a leader in sustainability. I launched the sustainability initiative at GW in 2009. I have the privilege of partnering with global corporations, small business, local and global NGOs, and local and federal governments to support the efforts at GW. I also teach Strategies for Sustainable Enterprise to MBAs at the GW School of Business.

Leading sustainability in an academic setting has allowed me to draw on my experience from various other sectors. While at SustainAbility, I was a strategy advisor to F500 companies. I learned a great deal about organizational change, market innovation and stakeholder engagement while working on projects for Darden Ford, Nike, Wal-Mart, Eli Lilly, and others. In the early 2000’s I worked at World Resources Institute and published Beyond Grey Pinstripes – the first ranking of business schools on social and environmental responsibility. While at WRI I worked with business schools around the world, especially in Latin America with faculty from Chile, Brazil, Peru, Argentina. All of that experience was great training for leading the strategy and implementation of sustainability at GW.

Most significant, though, was my work right out of college. In the ‘90’s I started out in Americorps working in community development on the South Side of Chicago. Back before “sustainability” was a field, I built community gardens and started community-based recycling programs in public housing in some of the poorest areas of our country. The intent was to address poverty and provide job training, look past violence and provide a safe space for personal growth, and to build a sense of community, pride, and healthier living. Still today I think this was the most rigorous, yet rewarding part of my career thus far. It prepared me for the challenges I face in my work today by providing me with first-hand experience in personal humility and understanding.

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Women in CSR: Paula Davis, Alcoa Foundation

| Tuesday December 3rd, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Paula DavisTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Paula Davis: I am the former President, Alcoa Foundation and Vice President, Alcoa Inc.; current Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Harman International.

Since 2010, I have led Alcoa Foundation with oversight of philanthropy, employee engagement and social responsibility.  With a team of eight outstanding individuals, we create innovative partnerships with nonprofit organizations around the world to improve the environment, educate tomorrow’s leaders in STEM and manufacturing, strengthen communities and inspire greater employee volunteerism.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?
PD: Over the last three and a half years in the foundation, we have made great progress on several fronts. First, we aligned our giving strategy with who we are as a mining, manufacturing and engineering company to focus our resources and create shared value. Second, we developed a meaningful community framework tool to help our 200 locations around the world more effectively engage in their communities and earn a social license to operate. Third, we designed an impact measurement system to evaluate our progress and outcomes. Now we use scorecards to measure program results, visibility and engagement, our three success metrics. Our goal? To answer the question: “Did your efforts and money make a difference?”

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