3p Contributor: Andrea Newell

Andrea Newell has more than ten years of experience designing, developing and writing ERP e-learning materials for large corporations in several industries. She was a consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and a contract consultant for companies like IBM, BP, Marathon Oil, Pfizer, and Steelcase, among others. She is a writer and former editor at TriplePundit. She has contributed to In Good Company (Vault's CSR blog), Evolved Employer, The Glass Hammer, EcoLocalizer and CSRwire. You can reach her at andrea.g.newell@gmail.com and @anewell3p on Twitter.

Recent Articles

Beastie Boys and GoldieBlox Tussle Over Fair Use in ‘Girls’ Video

| Tuesday November 26th, 2013 | 3 Comments

GB_Box_v6_6_2013Last year, I interviewed Debbie Sterling, founder and inventor of GoldieBlox, a line of toys and books designed to encourage girls to become interested in engineering principles and STEM careers. At that time, I was impressed with the extensive research and thought she put into the products and hoped that its Kickstarter campaign would succeed.

Turns out it more than succeeded – it went beyond its goal and GoldieBlox is now available in stores (disclosure: I ordered one for my daughter for Christmas). On top of that, GoldieBlox and three other sustainable endeavors are finalists in the Intuit competition for a Super Bowl ad.

To promote the fledgling company and garner votes for the competition, GoldieBlox created an attention-catching video of three girls who use a Rube Goldberg contraption (think MouseTrap game) that spans the house and the yard. It’s clever and cute, set to the tune of the mid-1980s song, “Girls,” by the Beastie Boys and has 8 million views to date. However, now the Beastie Boys are protesting the use of the song, leading to the beginnings of a legal war between the toy company and the band.

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Women in CSR: Molly Cartmill, Sempra Energy

| Tuesday November 26th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

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TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Molly Cartmill: I am the Director of Corporate Social Responsibility for Sempra Energy. I have worked for the Sempra Energy family of companies for 24 years in marketing, communications, community relations, government affairs—and now corporate social responsibility.

As director of corporate social responsibility, I lead a team of professionals who identify and respond to the environmental, social and governance issues that affect the company’s stakeholders. We work with more than 200 employees across our businesses to collect data, goals and results. We also gather stories of employees who perform outstanding acts of responsibility and integrity. Our work also includes getting input from a wide array of local, regional, national and international stakeholders. We develop and produce Sempra Energy’s annual corporate social responsibility (CSR) report and respond to investor-driven surveys and rankings. My team is also charged with overseeing the company’s  political reporting and compliance program, political contributions and the employees’ political action committee.

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Women in CSR: Tanya Bolden, Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG)

| Thursday November 21st, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Tanya Bolden AIAGTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Tanya Bolden: I am the Program Development Manager, Corporate Responsibility for the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG). I lead AIAG’s program on corporate responsibility (CR) and facilitate our work with teams of volunteers drawn from AIAG member companies, including Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Toyota, and Nissan, and their supply chain partners. We collaborate to develop and implement solutions to the array of challenges our industry faces, from improving global working conditions and environmental sustainability, to increasing transparency and respect for human rights in the supply chain.

I’ve been at AIAG for three years, and before that I was with GM for 20 years in a variety positions, most recently as corporate responsibility manager.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

TB: I’m proud to say that we’ve gone from several individual initiatives to a more coordinated, strategic approach to CR. When I came to AIAG, we had working conditions training, GHG estimating and reporting, and health and safety. Since then, I’ve built on those and introduced a new structure for CR, and really developed our social and environmental programs. We also established a Steering Committee, comprised of member company volunteers, which helps identify emerging issues and develop forward-looking approaches to them. As a few examples, we’ve created an environmental sustainability advisory group, launched chemical management awareness training, and we’ll soon offer training on the Globally Harmonized System, a UN initiative to standardize chemical safety information and thus reduce confusion.

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Women in CSR: Tamara “TJ” DiCaprio, Microsoft

| Tuesday November 19th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

TJ Dicaprio 2012TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Tamara “TJ” DiCaprio: As senior director of environmental sustainability, I’m responsible for reducing the environmental impact of Microsoft’s operations. Working closely with the Environmental SustainabilityCorporate Citizenship and Finance teams, in the last few years I’ve helped develop an internal carbon footprint strategy, establish an internal governance model and shape the direction of our internal corporate carbon reduction policy.

I feel like I’ve been in the environmental field all my life. My passion for the environment started early on when my parents opened my eyes to the world of nature. The initial event that catalyzed my commitment was the Santa Barbara Oil Spill of 1969, which helped foster the environmental movement. As a result, I was lucky enough to grow up during a very active time in developing U.S. national environmental policy. I graduated from the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) as one of the first groups of students with a degree in environmental studies in 1981. My professors and colleagues have continued to be a strong influence. These days I often return to UCSB as a guest lecturer to share best practices and continue my education, and I’m currently enrolled in the Sustainable MBA program at Marylhurst University.

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Women in CSR: Kabira Hatland, OgilvyEarth

| Thursday November 14th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

kh headshotTriplePundit: Name and title. Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Kabira Hatland: I am vice president with OgilvyEarth, a sustainability practice in the Ogilvy global network. I joined OgilvyEarth more than two years ago. I am part of the practice leadership team where we focus on bringing best-in-class sustainability communications counsel and programming to our clients.  My background has been in corporate and environmental communications and that’s my focus at OgilvyEarth as well. My work has included leading a global brewer’s thought leadership campaign in the arena of sustainable water use and providing strategic counsel for global sustainability clients ranging from food packaging and supermarkets to clean technology and waste to energy solutions.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

KH: Ogilvy’s parent company, WPP, reports on sustainability progress on behalf of its global network of communications agencies and has been doing so for the past ten years.  They have five focus areas for their sustainability efforts and reporting. They are: social and environmental impact of our work for clients; marketing ethics; employee health and development; environment – including climate change, water, waste and recycling; and social investment, including pro bono work, donations to charity and employee volunteering.

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Women in CSR: Carrie Majeske, Ford

| Tuesday November 12th, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

cmajeskeTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Carrie Majeske: I am the Associate Director of Global Sustainability Integration for Ford Motor Company.  I’ve been with Ford since 1984, and on the sustainability team since 2007, leading development of product sustainability strategies for CO2 emissions, fuel economy, sustainable materials, and life cycle assessment. In my current role, I work with various research teams studying ways to use waste and non-food crops in lieu of petroleum in plastics, experimenting with solutions to urban mobility/congestion, and identify sources of conflict minerals in our supply chain. Ford deals with complicated products with non-trivial social and environmental impact in a mature, highly-regulated industry so an important role of sustainability is to cut through some of the complexity and look beyond the regulatory horizon to decide where and how we can reduce environmental impact and improve social conditions while maintaining profitability.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

CM: As with many companies, Ford originally focused on the communication of environmental and social initiatives, mostly to achieve reputational value. Originally, the department reported through Government Affairs. Over the past 10-15 years, sustainability has become an integral part of the business; our Chief Sustainability Officer, Robert Brown, reports directly to the CEO.

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Women in CSR: Jacquelyn Ottman, J. Ottman Consulting

| Thursday November 7th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Ottman Orig Retouched Full 092810FINALFINALTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Jacquie Ottman: I’m the founder and principal of J. Ottman Consulting, Inc. We’re a marketing consulting firm founded in 1989 that advises businesses and government agencies on strategies for helping meet consumer needs sustainably. Some of our clients include Johnson and Johnson, Ingersoll Rand, and the USDA Certified Biobased labelling program. I’ve written extensively on effective green marketing strategies. My latest books are The New Rules of Green Marketing, and a co-authored e-book, How to Make Credible Green Marketing Claims: What Marketers Need to Know about the Updated FTC Green Guides.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

JO: We recently launched a new initiative entitled, WeHateToWaste.com. As the name implies, it’s an online global community of consumers who are motivated to prevent waste, conserve resources and get the most from the products they buy (and all those embedded resources they contain!) Why are we doing this? We recognize that meeting consumer needs sustainably takes a lot more than buying greener products. They need to be used in a more ethical way (e.g., Making sure the water’s off when you brush with that Tom’s of Maine toothpaste.)

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Women in CSR: Jennifer Silberman, Hilton Worldwide

| Tuesday November 5th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Silberman_HeadshotTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Jennifer Silberman: As Vice President of Corporate Responsibility at Hilton Worldwide, I am responsible for overseeing the development, integration and communication of Hilton Worldwide’s corporate responsibility strategy around the world. I joined the company in 2010, after eight years at APCO Worldwide, where I was Vice President in the corporate responsibility practice, counseling Fortune 500 companies and global foundations on strategy and program design, business integration, stakeholder engagement and results-oriented philanthropy. I have more than 20 years of experience working in the U.S., Latin America, and Africa in the areas of economic development, sustainability, human rights, women’s empowerment and youth opportunity.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

JS: Sustainability has deep roots at Hilton Worldwide. Our namesake and founder, Conrad Hilton, always believed that one “should assume your fair share of responsibility for the world in which you live.”  In 2009, we formalized this conviction with the creation of five-year sustainability goals to reduce our energy use and our carbon, waste, and water outputs across the full range of our hotel operations. We created tools to manage and assess our performance against these goals, officially launching LightStay™ – our proprietary sustainability measurement tool – in 2010. Then gradually, we began to integrate sustainability into our entire business by making it a brand standard across our global portfolio of hotels.

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Women in CSR: Cathy Benko, Deloitte LLP

| Thursday October 31st, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Benko - Ath J HiResTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Cathy Benko: Vice chairman and managing principal, Deloitte LLP. I hold dual roles, leading Deloitte LLP’s citizenship efforts and as a talent marketplace game-changer for Deloitte Consulting LLP. These positions tap into skills honed in prior roles including chief talent officer, lead client service partner, high technology industry sector leader, and national managing director of Deloitte’s award-winning Women’s Initiative.

“Making a difference, by doing what we do best, to make America stronger and the world a better place,” is our Citizenship mantra. We deliver on this mantra every day through a multitude of ways: from our pro bono program to advising our clients on sustainable water strategies, serving on nonprofit boards, delivering Impact Day scope-a-thons, and working with leading NGOs on innovative solutions to the world’s toughest societal issues – among many others. We’re proud of our contributions – valued at more than a half-billion dollars in cash and in-kind services over the past five years—and even more proud of the sustainable, positive impact these investments have resulted in.

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Women in CSR: Sophia Siskel, Chicago Botanic Garden

| Tuesday October 29th, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Sophia Shaw Siskel portraitTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Sophia Shaw Siskel: Since 2007, I have served as president and CEO of the Chicago Botanic Garden, one of the leading living museums and plant conservation science centers of the world. The 385-acre garden delivers an inspiring four-season garden experience annually to a million visitors, as well as offers an engaging calendar of public education programs to students of all ages.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company? 

SS: While the Chicago Botanic Garden is now known internationally as one of the great public gardens of the world, less well known are our efforts to understand and cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life. For example, we do this through jobs-training programs in plant conservation, urban agriculture and horticulture. The Garden’s plant biology and conservation science programs discover critically important knowledge and create practical land and water management solutions. Together with Northwestern University, the Garden offers a graduate program in Plant Conservation Biology. These programs have taken on even more urgency recently, as we know more about the earth’s changing climate. I am particularly proud of our ten-year Keep Growing strategic plan that guides the Garden’s work today—it highlights sustainability defined in many ways across all aspects of our institution.

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Women in CSR: Anne Kilgore, Eastman Chemical Company

| Thursday October 24th, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

A.Kilgore Headshot-1TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Anne Kilgore: I am Director of Sustainability for Eastman Chemical Company. As the director of sustainability at Eastman, I’m responsible for leading our company’s overall corporate sustainability program, including the development and implementation of our sustainability vision, principles, goals and project execution. Overall, my team is responsible for linking sustainability to our business and customer strategies, external commitments and performance tracking.

I’ve been with Eastman for more than 25 years, and have been in this role since April 2009. I spent the first part of my career with Eastman’s supply chain business, and prior to my current position was responsible for global marketing communications.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

AK: Eastman is a global specialty chemical company that produces a broad range of advanced materials, additives and functional products, specialty chemicals, and fibers that are found in products people use every day. As a company, we hold ourselves to very high standards and believe that how we do business is just as important as what we achieve.

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Millennials: Why They Bike

| Tuesday October 22nd, 2013 | 2 Comments

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bike and cityIs the Age of the Automobile over? Driving and car ownership is declining, and younger generations, most notably Millennials, are embracing alternate transportation. Bikes are cool again and cities are catching on that bike lanes can attract a younger workforce.

Multimodal millennials

According to a 2013 report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG), A New Way to Go: The Apps, Maps, and New Technologies that are Giving More Americans Freedom to Drive Less, “The average person ages 16-34 drove 23% less in 2009 than in 2001, the sharpest reduction for any age group.”

The report author, Phineas Baxandall, told USA Today that people have changed their travel habits sharply in the past eight years. Each year, he says, Americans “have been driving less on a per-person basis than the year before.”

The study draws a strong correlation between the increase in the use of the internet and smartphones and the decline in vehicle travel. Millennials like public transit because it enables them to stay connected while commuting. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, in 2008, only 31% of 16-year-olds and 77% of 19-year-olds had a driver’s license, while in 1978, it was 50% and 92% respectively.

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Women in CSR: Kathy Mulvany, Cisco

| Tuesday October 22nd, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Kathy Mulvany_personal photoTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Kathy Mulvany: As senior director of corporate affairs, I’m responsible for helping to steward Cisco’s overall corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy, build awareness of our CSR programs around the world, and engage with a broad set of stakeholders including customers, shareholders, governments, nonprofit partners and advocacy groups. Within Corporate Affairs, I oversee a number of teams, including CSR strategy and planning, marketing and communications, the Cisco Foundation and corporate grant making, CSR reporting and stakeholder engagement, as well as our veterans program.

I’ve been a part of Cisco’s Corporate Affairs organization for seven years and with Cisco since 1996. One benefit of working for a large corporation is that I’ve had the opportunity to move around within the business, which keeps it fresh while broadening my expertise and professional network. Having worked in various Cisco organizations over the years, including Corporate Marketing, Latin America Marketing and Office of the Chairman and CEO, I can honestly say I’ve found my passion in Corporate Affairs with CSR.

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20 Inspiring Quotes from SXSWeco 2013

| Monday October 21st, 2013 | 0 Comments

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MerrickBy Andrea Newell and Marissa Rosen

SXSWeco 2013 had business leaders, nonprofit leaders and some people who were both. Benefit corporations, municipalities, the media, disruptors and even a celebrity or two. Everyone came together to talk about climate change, materialism, sharing, conservation, environmentalism, sustainability, change and the future.

Here are some inspiring quotes by the people we saw, we met and we listened to.

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Mackinac Island: Where Cars are Banned and Bikes Rule the Road

| Thursday October 17th, 2013 | 0 Comments
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M-185, the only U.S. highway to ban cars.

The first thing you notice is the quiet. The only interstate in the U.S. to ban cars, M-185, has no honking horns, no exhaust, no road rage. Only the clop-clop-clopping of horse hooves, the Lake Huron waves hitting the lakeshore and the faint clicking of gears changing. Every so often, someone calls, “Coming on your left!” as they pass. Everyone smiles and pedals on.

In our recent series, The Business of Biking, we have explored how bike lanes bring revenue to stores and the health benefits and increased productivity when employees bike to work. Unknown to many, there is a town in the U.S. that banned cars in the late 1890s, later doubled down by making it law, and has excluded them to this day.

Mackinac Island, located in Lake Huron, between the lower and upper peninsulas of Michigan, is completely car-free (with the exception of a few emergency vehicles). But, it isn’t for any of the reasons that listed above, or any you could guess. It’s actually all about the horses.

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