3p Contributor: Andrea Newell

Andrea Newell has more than ten years of experience designing, developing and writing ERP e-learning materials for large corporations in several industries. She was a consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers and a contract consultant for companies like IBM, BP, Marathon Oil, Pfizer, and Steelcase, among others. She is a writer and former editor at TriplePundit. She has contributed to In Good Company (Vault's CSR blog), Evolved Employer, The Glass Hammer, EcoLocalizer and CSRwire. You can reach her at andrea.g.newell@gmail.com and @anewell3p on Twitter.

Recent Articles

Women in CSR: Heather Henriksen, Harvard University

| Thursday October 3rd, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Heather Henriksen2TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Heather Henriksen: I am the Director of Harvard University’s Office for Sustainability where for the last five years, I have led a team of 15 professionals that works in partnership with the faculty, students and staff at our 12 schools and central administrative departments to craft Harvard’s sustainability strategy. Our approach has been to create a large change management initiative focused on making our campus more efficient, reducing costs and fostering a healthier community. (You can learn more about our work here, or on Twitter and Instagram @GreenHarvard. We’re also on Facebook.)

Other than my work at Harvard, I have been a member of Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) since 2002, and my previous work experience includes private and nonprofit sector posts at Time Warner as a Director of Business Development & Communications and an Associate Director at Stanford Law School.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your organization?

HH: It has gone from a startup, grassroots organization and effort to one that is institutionalized into the way folks work and live on campus. President Faust has said that universities have a special role and special responsibility to confront global challenges like climate change and sustainability. Our entire community has really responded to that vision by taking action both inside and outside the classroom. As much as possible, we try to tap into the creative ideas our students, faculty and staff are generating and then work to replicate them university-wide for greater impact.

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Women in CSR: Deborah Holmes, EY

| Tuesday October 1st, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Photograph by Jonathan GaymanTriple Pundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Deborah Holmes: I’m the Americas Director of Corporate Responsibility for EY. About a decade ago, I launched this function and helped leadership to define EY’s corporate responsibility strategy, which rests on two pillars: (1) enabling our people to use and enhance their skills (“skill-based volunteerism”) and (2) focusing on three areas of content, which we call “the 3Es” – entrepreneurship, education and environment.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

DH: At the start – and it holds true today – we had people that were very involved in corporate responsibility. So in a sense, the ground was fertile for CR. The difficult part was getting people to understand that to take advantage of EY’s scale and really make a difference, we couldn’t support everyone’s favorite cause. We needed a CR strategy that aligned with our business strategy. So we’ve concentrated on investing in the 3Es because they’re in harmony with who we are as a firm, and where we’re going.

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Women in CSR: Nicole Trimble, Outerwall

| Thursday September 26th, 2013 | 2 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

N.TrimbleTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Nicole Trimble: I am the senior director of corporate responsibility at Outerwall Inc., the kiosk company that brings you products like Redbox and Coinstar. I started as the first person in this role about three years ago and lead our corporate responsibility strategy and programs. Before this position, I worked in a variety of philanthropic and service organizations including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Corporation for National and Community Service.

While at the Gates Foundation, I became convinced that real change and impact in the social and environmental sectors had to include business. Only the private sector has the speed, scale and urgency to address some of the world’s greatest problems and it is in business’ best interest to do so.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

NT: Outerwall Inc. was founded as Coinstar, Inc. more than 20 years ago by Jens Molbak, an entrepreneur with a vision to build a shared value business. Although the company has changed quite a bit, the founding principles have remained part of the culture. The office of corporate responsibility was initiated by our c-suite members who came from companies where CSR was a priority and wanted the same at Outerwall. I was brought on board to develop a cohesive vision and strategy for the company. In three short years we’ve accomplished quite a lot. We set environmental and social goals, produced two CSR reports and recently acquired a shared value company, ecoATM, the first company to create an electronics recycling kiosk to purchase used mobile phones, tablets and MP3 players for cash.

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Women in CSR: Shannon Schuyler, PwC

| Tuesday September 24th, 2013 | 1 Comment

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Shannon Schuyler_PhotoTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business. 

Shannon Schuyler: I am a principal and the U.S. Corporate Responsibility (CR) leader for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC). In this role, I oversee the actions and programs that unite the firm’s internal strategy around social and environmental responsibility, aligning each initiative to PwC’s overall business strategy in order to increase employee engagement, differentiate the brand in the marketplace and drive operational efficiencies.

I have ownership of PwC’s U.S. CR goals, including a $160 million commitment to youth education with a focus on financial literacy called, PwC’s Earn Your Future; a $10 million annual commitment to pro bono services for nonprofit organizations; a 30 percent firm-wide carbon reduction goal by FY’16; and 100 percent staff and partner engagement in the firm’s culture of giving. I also spend time dedicated to the firm’s external client-facing practice, Sustainable Business Solutions, facilitating discussions with clients on their approach to CR. I have been with the firm for 16 years.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company? 

SS: CR has always been part of PwC’s culture, but in the past it was more intuitive than it was strategic. Our people have always had an instinct to “do good,” but as recently as six years ago, we hadn’t yet come together to make consolidated and strategic investments to provide our people with the opportunity to unite and give back, be it to a cause, the environment or through the gift of time. We were missing a real opportunity.

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Women in CSR: Alison DaSilva, Cone Communications

| Thursday September 19th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Alison DaSilva Cone CommunicationsTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Alison DaSilva: As executive vice president of Cone CommunicationsResearch & Insights group, I am responsible for identifying and tracking CSR trends to keep our clients on the leading edge. I love to fill the information gaps with our proprietary research on stakeholder expectations, attitudes and behaviors related to companies’ CSR efforts. During my 15-year tenure at Cone, I have led the development of more than 35 studies, including our most recent 2013 Cone Communications/Echo Global CSR Study, which examined consumer expectations of companies in ten countries.

I apply these insights into action through strategic counsel for Cone clients such as NARS Cosmetics, Neiman Marcus, Walgreens, Target, American Cancer Society and Sodexo. I also serve as a regular contact for media and as a speaker at leading CSR conferences.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

AD: When I started at Cone 15 years ago, the agency was a pioneer in creating cause-related corporate programs, which included philanthropy, volunteerism, marketing and partnerships. Organically and through key hires, we quickly expanded our expertise to include CSR reporting and strategy development. In 2005, we were one of the first communications agencies to formalize a dedicated CSR discipline. Today, we continue to lead the industry through our ability to integrate three areas of dedicated, deep subject-matter expertise, including social impact, sustainable business practices and engagement and communications. Above all, we’re laser-focused on helping organizations go beyond purpose to show return for their business, their brand and our society.

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Women in CSR: Eileen Howard Boone, CVS Caremark Charitable Trust

| Tuesday September 17th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Eileen Howard Boone headshot_2013TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Eileen Howard Boone: I am the Senior Vice President of Corporate Philanthropy and Social Responsibility, CVS Caremark; President, CVS Caremark Charitable Trust. In my SVP role, I lead a team responsible for implementing a wide range of communications, philanthropic and CSR programs that align with the company’s purpose to help people on their path to better health. As President of the CVS Caremark Charitable Trust, the private foundation of CVS Caremark, I oversee the foundation’s charitable giving. I am also responsible for creating and managing strategic partnerships with nonprofit organizations that share in the Trust’s commitment to provide greater access to health care in communities throughout the country.

I have enjoyed 15 years of experience in corporate social responsibility and community relations.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

EHB: CVS Caremark is committed to fostering a culture of environmental responsibility within the company and throughout our supply chain. As part of this commitment, we establish goals, track our performance and report our progress to stakeholders.  To balance our environmental and fiscal responsibilities, we seek opportunities that deliver both business and social returns.

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Women in CSR: Nicole Stein, Umpqua Bank

| Thursday September 12th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Stein, Nicole_Professional picture[1]TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Nicole Stein: I have been vice president of community responsibility at Umpqua Bank for 10 years.

As vice president of community responsibility at Umpqua Bank, I oversee Umpqua’s community responsibility strategy and programs in a variety of areas, including strategic charitable giving, associate volunteerism, financial literacy initiatives, and environmental sustainability. I work closely with my team and with those throughout the company to ensure that the company’s conscience is reflected in our brand and culture, actions and intentions.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

NS: As we celebrate Umpqua’s 60th anniversary in 2013, we’re reflecting on our long history of serving our associates, customers and communities with integrity and action. Before we had formalized our community responsibility efforts, we focused primarily on community involvement programs that reinforced our social commitment to our communities and associates.

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Plastic-Dissolving Spray Could Shrink Landfills

| Wednesday September 11th, 2013 | 5 Comments

landfillThe idea to develop a plastic-eating spray to decrease landfill capacity began as a roundabout convergence of ideas by a couple of Brigham Young University students – neither of whom had focused on waste management before.

While spending time in Sweden on a mission trip, Brock Bennion and Nate Parkin noticed how clean the country was compared to the U.S. and became curious as to how they disposed of their waste. At the same time, they realized how much better care Scandinavians took of their environment.

Bennion had also read an article about how they used bacteria to eat the oil on the Louisiana coast after the BP oil spill. The idea for what would become PlasTek was born once the two returned to the U.S. more waste-conscious and compared notes. A few more friends and relatives got on board and they were off to change the [waste management] world.

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Women in CSR: Lisa Manley, Edelman

| Tuesday September 10th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Manley_Lisa_Headshot_CROPPEDTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Lisa Manley: I have one of the world’s greatest jobs! As an executive vice president within the Business + Social Purpose practice at Edelman, I collaborate with amazing companies across many industries to advance sustainable business strategies and communications.

My team and I help businesses and brands advance strategies that earn them the license to lead in today’s changing marketplace.

I have worked in the sustainability field for about 14 years. Before joining Edelman (a little over a year ago), I was the global director of sustainability communications at The Coca-Cola Company where I helped advance the company’s communications related to water stewardship, sustainable packaging, climate protection, sustainable agriculture, women’s economic empowerment, workplace rights and active, healthy living.

3p: How has the CSR/sustainability program evolved at your company?

LM: Edelman has a legacy of helping businesses and brands create lasting connections with social and environmental issues.

As an independent, family-owned firm, we put our people, our clients and our values first. That may sound like spin, but it’s actually really important. We build relationships for the long term, which is especially important in the sustainability field.

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Women in CSR: Trisha Cunningham, Texas Instruments

| Thursday September 5th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

TrishaCunningham-3TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Trisha Cunningham: I tell people all the time I have the best job at Texas Instruments. As Chief Citizenship Officer, I help TI and our employees make a difference in our community and our business every day. In my 27-year journey with the company, my experience working in global marketing, communications and public affairs at the product to corporate levels as well as community leadership has given me unique experiences that have prepared me for this role. I co-lead a cross-functional Citizenship Strategy Team with leaders across the company that represent our key focus areas including company operations, product stewardship, environmental responsibility, employee well-being, community commitment, responsible advocacy and corporate governance.

I have an outstanding team around the world that inspires our people, improves our communities and positively impacts business through corporate citizenship programs. It’s our goal to make corporate citizenship a competitive advantage for TI whether through assessing and addressing ways we can improve our business operations and transparency through reporting and communications, or investing in strong community engagements with employees and philanthropy.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

TC: It’s been part of our culture dating back to our founders over 80 years ago. They knew that strong companies build strong communities and strong communities build strong companies. That is still our mantra today. Not only has TI been a strong community partner, but we’ve instilled a strong culture of ethics, values and integrity. We were one of the first companies with a formal ethics office back in 1961. We continue to increase our transparency and work in collaboration with others in our industry on best practices. While we’ve produced environmental reports for over 15 years, we just completed our 7th citizenship report using the Global Reporting Initiative’s guidelines. It’s a journey.

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Women in CSR: Kim Marotta, MillerCoors

| Tuesday September 3rd, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Kim Marotta MillerCoors headshotTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Kim Marotta: I am Director of Sustainability for MillerCoors, the second-largest beer company in America. I joined Miller Brewing Company in 2004 to help build the company’s sustainability department and long-term sustainable business plan.

At MillerCoors, we believe that with great beer comes great responsibility, and as Director of Sustainability, my focus is ensuring that we turn those words into actions throughout our operations. I work with our commercial teams to integrate responsibility and environmental stewardship messages into our marketing campaigns and collaborate with our retailers on ways to engage beer drinkers on sustainability. A recent example is our Coors Recycles program, which we launched nationally in partnership with Recyclebank. We developed special packaging to educate consumers and encourage them to recycle. This packaging was on display at retail locations across the country.

Another of MillerCoors key focus areas is water stewardship, and I’m heavily involved in our efforts to reduce water use throughout our supply chain and brewery processes.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

KM: As Miller Brewing Company, the company’s sustainability commitments were owned by a small team and we were tasked with finding ways to improve the environment outside of our operations. Since the joint venture between SABMiller and Molson Coors in 2008, MillerCoors has really focused on integrating sustainability at a deeper level throughout the company. Now, our commitments are truly owned by our employees, from the boardroom to the brewery floor. Our employees are the driving force of our progress toward our sustainability goals. Most recently, their efforts helped us achieve our greatest water reductions in company history and landfill-free status at our Golden, Colo., brewery – which is the largest brewery in the U.S.!

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Women in CSR: Alex Liftman, Bank of America

| Thursday August 29th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

ALEX_LIFTMAN_Photo_medresolutionTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Alex Liftman: As Global Environmental Executive for Bank of America, I’m responsible for the company’s environmental sustainability strategy. I oversee our aggressive operational goals, our environmental business initiative, and our policy positions and philanthropic investments. I also get the chance to meet new people every day while collaborating with all parts of the bank, from the investment banking group to teams at local banking centers, to identify innovative opportunities and implement changes that that will help us achieve our goals. What’s exciting about pursuing revenue-producing opportunities is that they’re good for the environment and good for the business, so they’re win-win. For example, we’ve got a thriving renewable energy practice, a growing public finance business, and a wealth management business increasingly focused on providing more values-based investment opportunities for clients.

Just last year, we committed more than $4.5 billion toward underwriting, advising on and financing energy efficiency, renewable energy and other low-carbon transactions around the world. We also reduced our global net scope 1 and scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 7 percent, completed more than 600,000 square feet of LEED certified projects, and established an ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) counsel in our wealth management business that is responsible for developing our socially-responsible investing capacities.

I’ve been with Bank of America for almost 11 years now. Before assuming my current role, I had the chance to manage the communications strategy and serve on the leadership teams of a number of our lines of business, including Global Wealth & Investment Management, Small Business Banking/Business Banking and Corporate Social Responsibility.

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Women in CSR: Liz Maw, Net Impact

| Tuesday August 27th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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ED NOTE:  Please join TriplePundit at Net Impact’s 2013 conference in San Jose!

Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

LizMaw_HeadshotTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Liz Maw: I’ve been privileged to serve as Net Impact’s CEO for over 8 years, and during that time I’ve done a little bit of everything! In the early days I had to wear many hats, but as we’ve grown I’ve been able to focus more on strategy, our Board, partnerships, speaking, and fundraising. It’s been an exciting evolution.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

LM: Net Impact’s goals (to support emerging leaders in making a positive social and environmental impact in the workplace and the world) aren’t new – the organization began as the brain child of a group of MBAs in the 1990s who believed that business had a role to play in making the world a better place. But this idea has evolved from a fringe concept to something more mainstream; we now work with individuals, nonprofits, and companies who are firm believers in embedding sustainability across organizations and job functions. Our network has also grown tremendously to more than 40,000 student and professional members and over 300 volunteer-led chapters around the world. Our community encompasses 18-year-old undergrads all the way up to experienced professionals who share a common goal of driving positive change on campus and throughout their careers.

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Women in CSR: Liz Gorman, Cone Communications

| Thursday August 22nd, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here.

Liz Gorman1TriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Liz Gorman: I am Senior Vice President, CSR/Sustainable Business Practices at Cone Communications.

Every day for the past 13 years, I have woken up excited and enthused to collaborate with my teams and get to work helping our clients – typically corporate communications or CSR/sustainability execs – who are striving to advance their company missions with regard to social and environmental responsibility. I’ve worked with clients in a variety of industries – from health care to consumer products and technology to retail. The common thread between all of our clients is their dedication to finding solutions that can help to address societal problems, both big and small. And I’d like to think the work we do at Cone moves our clients a few steps closer to fulfilling their CSR missions.

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

LG: Cone Communications is a boutique PR agency with a strong focus on CSR and sustainability strategy and communication services. With fewer than 150 employees, we know our environmental impacts and social contributions are minor when compared to billion-dollar businesses. But that doesn’t stop us from acting like a bigger company, one that fosters a culture of responsible business practices, invests in sustainability and embraces opportunities to give back to the local community. For instance, we did an initial assessment of our energy use and carbon footprint in 2007 and established a goal of reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent by 2015. Much like our client companies that have adopted energy efficient initiatives, we followed suit by consolidating the servers in our data center, migrating to energy efficient lighting and incorporating an energy management system. We’ve moved the needle on shrinking our own carbon footprint and have reported our progress on this initiative and many others through frequent updates of our CSR report. While small in size, we are definitely big at heart.

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Women in CSR: Annie Longsworth, Saatchi & Saatchi S

| Tuesday August 20th, 2013 | 0 Comments

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Welcome to our series of interviews with leading female CSR practitioners where we are learning about what inspires these women and how they found their way to careers in sustainability. Read the rest of the series here. 

Annie_1_usethisoneTriplePundit: Briefly describe your role and responsibilities, and how many years you have been in the business.

Annie Longsworth: I am the CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi S, North America. I am responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations – from projects to people – as well as helping to make sustainability irresistible through purpose-driven strategy, employee engagement and communications programs. I’ve been at Saatchi & Saatchi S about 18 months, and working in sustainability for the last seven years. I recognized the importance of brand and communication in sustainability early – back when just saying “eco” inspired cries of “Greenwash!” – so it’s gratifying to see core principles like transparency and authenticity starting to take hold.  

3p: How has the sustainability program evolved at your company?

AL: Saatchi & Saatchi S is fully dedicated to sustainability every day, so more than a program, it’s simply how we operate. We are, however, constantly looking for ways to deepen our commitment and also to impact our global network.

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