3p Contributor: Andrew Burger

An independent journalist, writer and researcher, my work roams across the nexus where technology, political economy, sociology and ecology intersect and overlap. The apparently lifelong quest for self-knowledge and self-realization, a bit of wisdom and some grace -- not to mention gainful employment -- has led me near and far afield, from Europe, across the Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa and across the Americas. Twitter: @mightysparrow LinkedIn: andrew burger Google+: Andrew B Email: Huginn.Muginn@gmail.com

Recent Articles

Asian Energy Expansion Means We’re Probably Too Late to Avert Climate Change Disruption

| Tuesday October 15th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Greenpeace

Credit: Greenpeace

Tropical countries worldwide will be experiencing massively disruptive climate change within a generation as a definitive shift in climate takes hold. It won’t be long after that definitive climate change takes hold in temperate zone countries, according to a new research report from the lab of University of Hawaii Department of Geography professor, Camilo Mora.

Current high temperatures in Kingston, Jamaica will likely be the new lows come 2028, with new temperature ranges established in Singapore (2028), Mexico City (2031), Cairo (2036), Phoenix and Honolulu (2043) defining new climate regimes thereafter. Globally, new climate regimes that set the terms of existence in societies and ecosystems worldwide are likely to be irrevocably established by 2047, according to Mora Lab’s innovative analysis.

For decades, the world’s leading climate scientists have been warning of the wide ranging and profound risks, threats and costs to societies and ecosystems worldwide if we continue to pump ever greater quantities of carbon and greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, a conclusion the first installment of the latest UN International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) makes with greater certainty than ever.

Curtailing human carbon and greenhouse gas emissions is the key to avoiding such sharp, drastic and sudden climate change. As illustrated by a new analysis and forecast of energy demand and use in Southeast Asia, the odds of this happening look to range between slim and none, however.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Venture Capitalists Invest More Funding in Solar

| Monday October 14th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Abengoa Solar

Credit: Abengoa Solar

Venture capital funding in the solar energy sector rose for the third consecutive quarter in 3Q 2013, increasing 9.5 percent quarter over quarter, from $189 million in 2Q 2013 to $207 million, according to Mercom Capital Group’s Solar Funding and M&A 2013 Third Quarter Report.

Thirty-seven large-scale project financings – a total of 1,267 megawatts (MW) of renewable power capacity – were announced in 3Q, with disclosed funding totaling $2.89 billion. Overall, the 106 solar energy project financings announced through 3Q exceeds that for all of 2012, when 84 project financings were announced.

Disclosed capital raised by third-party solar finance companies for residential and commercial solar projects through 3Q also surpassed that for all of 2012. Third-party solar finance companies have raised $2.4 billion in capital thus far in 2013 as compared to 2012′s total of $2 billion.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Abengoa Secures Financing to Complete Europe’s Largest Concentrating Solar Power Complex

| Wednesday October 2nd, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Abengoa

Credit: Abengoa

Sustainable energy technology and systems developer Abengoa announced on September 30 that half of Europe’s largest solar power facility is now online and pumping out enough clean, renewable energy to meet the needs of some 104,000 households, and that it had secured financing to complete the second half of the project.

Two of four 50-megawatt (MW) parabolic concentrating solar power (CSP) plants – Solaben 1 and Solaben 6 – are up and running at the Extremadura Solar Complex (ESC), Abengoa announced in a press release. The news is especially encouraging given Spain’s financial and economic woes, and the toll they’ve taken on Spain’s once world-leading solar power market and government support for renewable energy.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

NOAA Restoration Center Funds Community Ocean Clean Up Projects

| Wednesday October 2nd, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: NOAA

Credit: NOAA

Huge, swirling masses of plastic waste; dead zones from terrestrial run-off of fertilizer, industrial effluents and untreated municipal sewage; toxic oil spills, dwindling wild fish stocks, ocean acidification from greenhouse gas emissions and its implications at the base of the marine food web – the worrisome, myriad effects of human activities on the world’s oceans are getting a lot of media play, and justifiably so.

Reaching out to and engaging local communities, a mix of NGOs, Native American tribes, academic groups and government agencies aim to do some cleaning up of our nation’s shorelines and coastal waters. Eleven groups across the country have received $967,000 in funding through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Habitat Conservation and Restoration Center.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Investing in Biking Yields a Big Bang for Portland’s Public Buck

| Tuesday October 1st, 2013 | 1 Comment

business-of-bikes-topper

Credit: Streetfilms via Vimeo

Credit: Streetfilms via Vimeo

Bicycling’s numerous and varied benefits – economic, social and environmental – have long been recognized, though given short shrift in the way of institutional value or support. That’s changing. Public and private sector decision makers in cities and communities across the U.S. and around the world – spurred by persistent advocacy at the grassroots level and biking’s near universal popularity – are factoring bicycling into integrated urban, suburban, and even rural transportation, development and sustainability plans.

Here in the U.S., Portland has been a leading light in this regard. In 2003, city leaders and transit authorities launched a public campaign to encourage residents to bike, walk and make greater use of public transportation. They also began building out biking infrastructure – dedicated bike paths, lanes, signage, etc. – and began funding public educational initiatives and research studies to better measure and understand biking’s overall scale, scope, costs and benefits, as well as how it fits into the overall transportation mix.

The results have been so encouraging that Portland’s City Council on September 18 voted unanimously in favor of investing $20.7 million in federal funding to make improvements to biking and pedestrian transportation. Longer term, the city’s Bicycle Plan for 2030 calls for 25 percent of city travel to be on bicycles by that year. That, it has been calculated, would entail 20 percent of Portlanders riding their bicycles 15 minutes each day.

In order to realize this goal, city leaders have proposed making another $100 million in biking investments through 2030. Considered among all the issues and challenges facing the city, can investing in biking at such scale genuinely be considered good use of scarce capital and other resources? Evidence indicates that’s very much the case.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Energy Efficiency Drive Yields $1 Billion Savings for U.S. Manufacturers

| Tuesday October 1st, 2013 | 0 Comments

bulb with business background Reduced energy consumption and greater energy efficiency across more than 120 U.S. manufacturing businesses and over 1,750 plants have resulted in some $1 billion in savings and avoided the equivalent of about 11 million metric tons (MT) of CO2 emissions, according to the Department of Energy (DOE), which recognized their achievements during the World Energy Engineering Congress in Washington, DC September 25.

DOE, via its Better Buildings, Better Plants Program, is spearheading President Obama’s nationwide drive to double U.S. energy productivity by 2030, a goal viewed as central to increasing competitiveness and profitability of U.S. manufacturers and job creation, as well as mitigating the effects of climate change and improving Americans’ overall health and well-being.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

EPA Proposes Carbon Emissions Limits on New U.S. Power Plants

| Wednesday September 25th, 2013 | 0 Comments

coalpowerplantFollowing through on a June 25, 2013 Presidential Memorandum, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on September 20 proposed new, precedent-setting Clean Air Act limits on carbon emissions from new power plants. The proposed rule, which is open for public comment for 60 days upon publication in the Federal Register, marks a milestone in the Obama Administration’s broad-based, ongoing efforts to realize the goals expressed in the President’s National Climate Change Action Plan.

“Climate change is one of the most significant public health challenges of our time,” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy stated in an EPA press release. “By taking commonsense action to limit carbon pollution from new power plants, we can slow the effects of climate change and fulfill our obligation to ensure a safe and healthy environment for our children,” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said. “These standards will also spark the innovation we need to build the next generation of power plants, helping grow a more sustainable clean energy economy.”

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

VW Earns Top Honors for Sustainability & Carbon Disclosure

| Wednesday September 25th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Volkswagen AG

Credit: Volkswagen AG

In his pioneering time and motion studies, Frederick W. Taylor applied empirical, data-driven scientific methods to business management, thereby contributing greatly to the creation of the socioeconomic paradigm that ushered in the modern Industrial Age. Today, leading business executives and public sector organizations are reaching beyond these narrow, shortsighted boundaries.

In an era where ecological sustainability, social responsibility and social equity pose growing opportunities, as well as threats, to the sustainability of their business enterprises, corporations of all stripes have a vested self-interest in helping create a much more holistic, interdisciplinary socioeconomic and business management paradigm such as that expressed in the triple bottom line.

Volkswagen AG (VW), the world’s third largest automotive group, is at the forefront of this wave of fundamental change. With the launch of its Think Blue vision of environmental sustainability, VW elevated ecological and social responsibility to the level of profitability and quality as core business values and strategic drivers.

VW’s efforts and progress on the triple bottom line front have been impressive, and they’re ongoing. Recently, the company was recognized for its efforts to embrace sustainability and enhance the environmental and social sustainability of its activities from the Carbon Disclosure Project and RobecoSAM, as well as forging ahead in its efforts to make greater use of renewable energy.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

DOE Partners with Georgetown to Launch Small Town Energy Efficiency Prize

| Friday September 20th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Georgetown University Energy Prize

Credit: Georgetown University Energy Prize

This past July, President Obama chose Georgetown University as the venue to launch his administration’s historic National Climate Change Action Plan, a precedent-setting strategy whose three principal aims are to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, prepare the U.S. for climate change impacts, and lead international efforts to address climate change.

The choice of Georgetown U. as a venue may have been more than a matter of appropriate setting and local convenience. This past March, the university’s program on Science in the Public Interest (SPI) and McDonough School of Business’ Global Social Entrepreneurship Initiative (GSEI) announced plans to launch the Georgetown University Energy Prize, a two-year nationwide energy efficiency competition. The competition will give small and medium-sized communities nationwide (populations 5,000-250,000) the chance to vie for a $5 million prize and participate in a nationwide effort to lower energy consumption, boost energy efficiency and reduce energy bills.

Adding momentum to the initiative, the Department of Energy (DOE) this week announced a commitment to collaborate on the energy prize, which it describes as “a competition to encourage innovative, replicable, and scalable approaches to reducing energy use in communities across the United States.”

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

The Triple Bottom Line and the Wealth of Nations

| Monday September 16th, 2013 | 1 Comment
Image credit: Natural Capital Project

Image credit: Natural Capital Project

While there are thousands of organizations working to solve the world’s problems, the ways these groups operate and measure success differ markedly.

Perhaps these differences could be overcome if local public interest and community development groups were to use similar metrics, tools and methodologies to support their efforts and realize their aims?

Could the most pressing challenges facing society – including those of socioeconomic and environmental justice – really be resolved with better data? Imagine if community organizations made use of holistic triple bottom line metrics to do the same sorts of empirical, data-driven research and strategic planning conducted by IBM, Apple, ExxonMobil, Walmart and World Bank.

Beyond GDP: Measuring sustainable development

Despite its predominance and universal use, the limitations of GDP as an overall indicator of health and well-being have long been recognized by those working in a range of fields. As Hunter Lovins is fond of saying, cancer is great for GDP, but it ain’t great for the patient! Economists, such as Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen, work hard to develop more holistic, inclusive standards and indicators of overall national health and well-being that consider social, natural resource and ecosystems health in addition to economic growth.

Leading international organizations, NGOs, and business groups, including the United Nations, World Bank Group, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD),  are also leading the charge.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

How to Address Economic & Environmental Problems in One Shot

| Monday August 26th, 2013 | 1 Comment
Credit: Green For All

Credit: Green For All

Environmental, technological, socioeconomic and political forces continue to disrupt and reshape American and global society, manifesting themselves today in what many see as twin economic and ecological crises. The ability of American capitalism and society to create the number and quality of employment opportunities characteristic of previous generations has been waning.

Coincidentally, the disruptive and destructive effects of climate change and ecological degradation, along with successive military campaigns in the Middle East, have become increasingly apparent and costly, leading growing numbers of Americans to question our continued support for, and reliance on, fossil fuels.

However, public and private sector policies and actions centered firmly on climate change mitigation and adaptation offer us the ways and means to address these twin crises simultaneously. Job creation can address both growing economic inequality and the growing threats to ecological sustainability in American society. Economically viable and socially and environmentally responsible policy options – like job creation – exist, advocates for environmental justice assert. The only thing lacking, they contend, is the sociopolitical will to enact them.

The best of times, the worst of times envkuwait

Launched in Oakland, California in 2007 by then head of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, Van Jones, Green For All zeroes in on realizing the potential for climate change action to address environmental injustice, lift people out of poverty and redress disparities in U.S. income and wealth – inequality that has reached disturbing, historic proportions.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency on the Rise in Indian Country

| Wednesday August 21st, 2013 | 6 Comments
Credit: Lakota Solar Enterprises

Credit: Lakota Solar Enterprises

Read the series companion piece to this post, Native Americans, Renewable Energy and Environmental Justice.

Natural resources on Native American lands have been instrumental in the socioeconomic development of cities, suburbs and rural areas across the American West. Native Americans living on tribal lands continue to struggle with a basic lack of infrastructure (water, electricity and transport), public services (health and education), and opportunities to better themselves socially and economically, however. Adding to all this, they live with and shoulder the costs of the resulting long-term and unaccounted for damage and degradation to ecosystems and the essential services they provide.

Looking to turn the tide in their favor, Native Americans, with support from the federal government, are increasingly turning to renewable energy and energy efficiency in a bid to develop and realize the untapped human, as well as wind, solar, biomass and geothermal, energy and resource potential that resides on Native American tribal lands. TriplePundit (3p) spoke with two individuals at the center of this movement, one that seeks to address the issues of environmental justice and conservation along with sustainable socioeconomic development.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Native Americans, Renewable Energy and Environmental Justice

| Monday August 19th, 2013 | 1 Comment
Credit: Daily Kos

Southwestern Native Americans lead 50-Mile March to Move Beyond Coal. Credit: Daily Kos

Around the nation many organizations have zeroed in on the nexus where renewable energy development meets environmental justice – renewables on tribal lands.

Marginalized and struggling to address a range of socioeconomic and environmental problems, the 566 Native American tribes recognized by the federal government as eligible to receive services from the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs are increasingly looking to leverage and capitalize on their green energy resources. And, in contrast to past experiences with energy resource development, they’re looking to exert a greater degree of autonomy and earn a greater share of the benefits in doing so.

Just last week, the Moapa Band of Paiutes announced plans to develop as much as 1.5 gigawatts (GW) worth of solar energy projects on tribal lands in Clark County, Nevada. This time around, they will not only receive lease payments for use of their land, as they do for a 350-MW solar power project – the first to be approved by the Department of Interior on Native American tribal lands, but they are taking a majority equity stake in an initial new project – a 250-MW solar PV facility. Local hiring, direct and indirect knock-on economic effects and revenue from selling power to electric utilities across the Southwest will add additional economic benefit.

Will renewable energy revise the legacy of energy resource development on Native American lands?

The potential benefits of renewable energy development on Native American tribal lands seem clear. Representing two percent of U.S. land, Native American tribal lands hold an estimated five percent of national renewable energy resources, according to a comprehensive study commissioned by the Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL).

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Philippine Fishing Community to Make Pioneering Use of Wireless Broadband

| Tuesday August 13th, 2013 | 2 Comments
Credit: InterAksyon

Credit: InterAksyon

Internet connectivity is coming to remote communities and fisherfolk in the Danajon Reef Marine Key Bioiversity Area of the Philippines’ Bohol province for the first time, courtesy of TV White Space wireless broadband technology developed by the Philippines’ Information and Communications Technology Office (ICTO).

Also known as “Super Wi-Fi,” the new wireless broadband network service will initially be enlisted in support of the Philippine government’s sustainable fisheries and poverty alleviation efforts. Bohol fisherfolk will use the service to electronically and remotely register for permits and send data to the Philippines’ Department of Agriculture as part of government’s efforts to “produce more fish, to feed more people, and generate more jobs,” according to an InterAksyon report.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

North Atlantic Sustainable Fisheries Management Highlights Challenges in Regional Governance

| Monday August 5th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Credit: Islandsbanki, "North Atlantic Seafood Market Report, April 2013"

Credit: Islandsbanki, “North Atlantic Seafood Market Report, April 2013″

Home to some of the richest fishing grounds in the world, fishing in the North Atlantic has a long and storied history. The continuation of that tradition and legacy has been put in jeopardy over recent decades as the health, integrity and viability of fish stocks and marine ecosystems have become increasingly vulnerable to a variety of threats, and that just as a rising world population looks to the seas to help meet its growing need for food and nutrition.

With worldwide food demand projected to as much as double by 2050, countries around the world are looking to the world’s oceans as a critical source of food and nutrition, as well as energy and mineral resources. And with wild fish stocks and catches on the decline, aquaculture production has been growing rapidly to account for a larger and larger share of North Atlantic and worldwide seafood production, a trend that’s expected to continue, and even accelerate, in years to come.

Supranational, ecosystems-based governance of fisheries and marine resources has become critical to maintaining the viability of marine ecosystems for current as well as future generations. Establishing and maintaining the institutional frameworks to accomplish this is fraught with tradeoffs and the potential for dispute and conflict, however. In the first case of its kind, the European Union (EU) voted last week to impose bans on North Atlantic herring and mackerel from the Faroe Islands. The trade action was based on the Faroe Islands’ decision to break from regionally instituted sustainable fishing limits and unilaterally treble its herring quota.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »