Carl Nettleton

Carl Nettleton is an acclaimed writer, speaker, facilitator, and analyst. He heads Nettleton Strategies, an environmental policy firm specializing in oceans, all things water, energy, climate, and U.S. Mexico border issues. Carl also founded OpenOceans Global, an NGO linking people to the world's oceans. Carl also serves on the national and California advisory councils for Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2), a national, nonpartisan group of business owners, investors and others who advocate for policies that are good for the economy and good for the environment. He is also active with the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Energy and Water Committee, the international Eye on Earth initiative, and other business and environmental organizations.

San Diego and Tijuana Share Uncertainty About Border Crackdown

Though separated by a border, San Diego and Tijuana function almost as sister cities. Residents cross regularly to work, shop, and visit with friends and family. What do the recent executive orders issued by U.S. President Donald Trump mean to these two cities? How will building a border wall, increasing enforcement at the border and deporting more undocumented individuals impact the region? 3p’s Carl Nettleton speaks with business leaders on both sides of the border to find out.

In Los Angeles, A New Approach to Marine Science

A new collaborative in Los Angeles aims to create “an ocean that will sustain future generations.” And it’s not a pie-in-the-sky concept — it taps into a $1.3 trillion “blue economy” experts say will only continue to grow.

Despite Trump’s Carrier Deal, US Manufacturing Jobs Remain at Risk

President-elect Donald Trump’s deal to stop the Indiana air-conditioning manufacturer from moving a plant to Mexico has been one of the most discussed of his pre-presidency moves. Mr. Trump contends he has saved more than 1,000 U.S. jobs. However, experts — including Greg Hayes, the CEO of United Technologies (UTC), Carrier’s parent firm — indicate the decision will ultimately result in fewer jobs.

Emissions from Coal Flatten But Don’t Reflect Planned Increases in Use

The 2016 Global Carbon Project’s annual analysis of carbon emissions showed that contributions from coal declined by 0.28 percent during the last year. While this is a hopeful statistic and part of a flattening trend prevalent for the last three years, it does not reflect predictions for coal use globally.

The Rise of Water and Energy Self-Sufficiency

The trend toward sufficiency filters all the way from the largest cities to the smallest towns as communities and businesses invest in locally-renewable water and energy.