Jan Lee

Jan Lee is a former news editor and award-winning editorial writer whose non-fiction and fiction have been published in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the U.K. and Australia. Her articles and posts can be found on TriplePundit, JustMeans, and her blog, The Multicultural Jew, as well as other publications. She currently splits her residence between the city of Vancouver, British Columbia and the rural farmlands of Idaho.


National Carbon Commitments: Good, But Good Enough?

The UNFCCC’s deadline has passed, and a preliminary vote is in: We’ve slashed the projected global temp for the next century, but not far enough. Here’s the round up of what 146 nations did to move the mark away from global warming, and why meeting the 2°C maximum temp is going to be tough, but doable.


Volkswagen Is Not Alone in Emissions, Performance Problems

Critics are asking why it took the EPA and California Air Resources Board 18 months to tell consumers that they were aware of serious emissions problems with some VW diesel vehicles. And while fed and state regulators say they will be looking more closely at other brands, a European advocacy group has already determined that VW is not alone in its problems, and that there needs to be greater oversight in testing by government regulators.


XPrize to Pay $20M for Successful Carbon Capture + Conversion

Always wanted to win $20 million? Well, now’s your chance. Figure out how, and what to convert the world’s carbon emissions to, and you’ll have the attention of scientists all over the world. Oh, and you may just solve one of the biggest challenges yet facing our battle against climate change.


Companies, Communities Step Up to Inspire Nations to Help Syrian Refugees

If Nova Scotia’s Mi’kaq First Nations are successful in their petition to the Canadian government, the island of Cape Breton will be a new home for Syrian refugees. And if the Israeli company SodaStream gets its way, it will be able to provide jobs for 1,000 refugees – in Israel. A variety of companies and communities are stepping up to help the burgeoning flow of refugees – in some cases, to the consternation of their governments. Is this the new humanitarian movement, or just a gentle encouragement for governments to help? Either way, they are committed to making a difference in Syria’s humanitarian crisis.


Volkswagen CSR Reports were the Tip-Off, Say Analysts

We invest a lot of faith in companies’ CSR programs, especially when they are companies we have known for years. So apparently, does the EPA, which missed indications in Volkswagen’s sustainability reports that suggested there was an ongoing problem.

Tufts students demonstrate in favor of divestment

Global Fossil Fuel Divestment Assets Reach $2.6 Trillion

Yesterday’s announcement at Climate Week NYC by Divest-Invest blows the lid off last year’s goals to urge companies, organizations and private investors to divest from fossil fuels. Conservative estimates were aimed at tripling last year’s divestment numbers of $50 billion. This year’s divestment of $2.6 trillion is 50 times last year’s record.


Map Your Local Climate Change With Weather Data

There was a time when figuring out what Mother Nature had in store for us could be accessed from a book — or at least that’s what farmers figured. Today, with mounting climate change issues, the WX Shift website is the go-to source that not only pinpoints what your seasonal weather has been doing, but also highlights how local trends are helping to exacerbate global climate change.


Fracking Chemicals Can Cause Endocrine Disruption and Illness, Says Study

Scientists have been debating the environmental impacts of fracking for years. But now there’s a new study that confirms that exposure to fracking chemicals may also cause metabolic damage in humans. The researchers are calling for more intensive study and oversight of the use of these chemicals, which authors point out has lacked regulatory clarity by the feds.


Wearable Tech Goes Recycle-less

The three Rs, reduce, reuse and recycle have become the mantra for the 21st century. But wearable tech, and the invention of components invisible to the naked eye, are shifting the way we think about our favorite gizmos and what we do with them when they have reached the end of life cycle.