Jan Lee

Jan Lee is a former news editor and award-winning editorial writer whose non-fiction and fiction have been published in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the U.K. and Australia. Her articles and posts can be found on TriplePundit, JustMeans, and her blog, The Multicultural Jew, as well as other publications. She currently splits her residence between the city of Vancouver, British Columbia and the rural farmlands of Idaho.

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EPEAT: Moving the Electronics Market Toward Green Standards

Government regulation is often the go-to answer when it comes to environmental issues, like reducing waste in landfill. But when it came to developing standards to reduce e-waste and ensure that computers, monitors and other electronics were built ‘green,’ it was purely a matter of industry consensus. Oh, and lots and lots of hard work.

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The Line on the Sidewalk: South Florida’s Climate Change Dilemma

Florida’s coastline is world famous for its tourism amenities. The state is also a vital transportation nexus for the country, providing an essential link with Latin America. And of course, people love going to the Kennedy Space Center to learn about the country’s space endeavors. But all three of those vital Florida industries face considerable challenges if sea levels continue to rise. So does Miami’s million-dollar shorelines, which face insurance problems, flooding landscape and the prospects of a sizable exodus in coming years.

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Toms of Maine: Turning Hot Air into a Sustainable Resource

Today’s technology makes yesterday’s most basic, manual tasks — like cleaning an intricate set of pipes — a whiz. But it also creates its own challenges when it comes to recovering precious resources and reducing your carbon footprint. Tom’s of Maine, famous for natural personal care products, figured out a way to ensure that its manufacturing and sterilizing processes can still meet the demands of the company’s 2020 sustainability goals.

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American Humane Association: The Challenges of Policing Animal Abuse

It’s been tough for Foster Farms. A year-long string of antibiotic-resistant salmonella cases, plant issues and now an animal cruelty complaint. But major animal welfare advocates really want to know how its certifying agency, the American Humane Association, could have missed the signs of abuse on the plant floor. According to one publication and a host of animal advocates from Hollywood, more questions need to be asked.

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MGM Resorts: Inclusive Training Programs are the Key to Great Leaders

MGM Resorts’ 15 casinos and resort locations are known worldwide for their getaway destinations. But these days, the company is winning awards for another kind of excellence: leadership and mentorship programs that not only accept gender and ethnic diversity, but also encourage diversity of thought from its leaders.

Field of sugar beet at Alnarp (June 2005).

Monsanto Tests the Waters with Reddit ‘Ask Me Anything’ Session

Monsanto took to the Web in an unusual question-and-answer session last week, as part of Reddit’s “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) platform. The questions were fast and furious, and the answers were, for the most part, revealing. Did we learn anything? Yes.

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Israel to California: Here’s How to Overcome Drought

What can a tiny nation smaller than Lake Michigan teach a state like California? According to Mother Nature, plenty. Israel, which has had its own challenges with long-term droughts, says it has learned a few tricks of the trade when it comes to water conservation and agricultural water use. But overcoming the challenges may mean dramatic changes to the way water is managed and used in the Golden State, as it did for Israel’s burgeoning cities two decades ago.

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Tiny Houses Are Gaining a Footing in North American Cities

Miniature seems to be in these days. For those who always wanted to own a house but couldn’t quite stand the thought of a mortgage that would outlive your lifespan, a tiny house may be just the thing. The number of amenities one can squeeze into a 10-foot-wide living space, say experts, depends strictly on creativity. Of course, it also depends on city bylaws. But city councils are beginning to realize that tiny homes with tiny footprints are actually a good thing.

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3 Architects Who are Converting Your Waste to Buildings

What does it really mean to repurpose the waste we generate? Well, for one, it means thinking outside the box, as these architects and their students have demonstrated. They say they have found the secret ingredient to sustainable homes: our waste.

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France Bans Roundup, While Monsanto Eyes U.K. as New Home

The Europeans’ love-hate relationship with Monsanto can be dizzying at times. While the American agrichemical company is courting (or trying to court) its Swiss competitor Syngenta, Monsanto is also reportedly looking for a home in the U.K., an area not historically known for its enthusiasm for the GMO industry. Meanwhile, in a move that seems suspiciously coincidental, France took rapid steps to ban the sale of Roundup on Sunday. And Syngenta’s stockholders? Still unimpressed with American brashness.

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Why Foster Farms is Dropping Antibiotic Use in Chickens

Foster Farms’ two new product lines are a big deal to the 76 year-old poultry manufacturer. But it’s even bigger news for the industry, which is being transformed by the FDA’s call for nixing human antibiotics in livestock. But will it be enough to bolster Foster Farms’ sales, given that consumers are now moving toward other companies that already offer antibiotic-free poultry?

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Diversity: The Shaping of Modern-Day Leadership

The qualities of today’s business manager must be broad-ranging: able to navigate complex, often changing definitions of the labor force, capable of staying abreast of technological challenges in small business settings and managing an increasingly diverse workforce. It’s not a job for the faint of heart.

P&G mobile relief effort in Union Beach, N.J. after Hurricane Sandy tore through the area earlier in the week, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (Stuart Ramson/Insider Images for Procter & Gamble)

Disaster Relief Efforts: The Private Sector Has a Role to Play

It seems like aid agencies are scrambling to provide disaster relief almost every few months these days. Their efforts would not be half as effective if it weren’t for the contributions of companies like P&G, which provides an essential life-saving component in many natural emergencies. Its Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program has been instrumental in guaranteeing clean water for disaster victims in areas where drinking water has been contaminated. In the process, it’s educating employees and consumers about the many ways there are to extend a hand to those in need.

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GE Introduces the ‘Smart’ Digital Wind Farm

GE’s new Digital Wind technology looks at the commercial wind farm from a whole new angle. But will its new brainstorm be able to sizably boost output? GE is betting on it.

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Theo Chocolate: The Challenge of Going Green

What does it take to be sustainable in today’s business world? We catch up with Joe Whinney, CEO and co-founder of Theo Chocolate, to get an inside scoop on what’s involved in building a green enterprise that will have a lasting impact on the way we do business.