3p Contributor: Mary Mazzoni

Mary Mazzoni Based in Philadelphia, Mary Mazzoni is a senior editor at TriplePundit. She is also a freelance journalist with a passion for storytelling and sustainability. Her work has appeared in the Philadelphia Daily News, Earth911, the Huffington Post, Sustainable Brands and the Daily Meal.

Mary is a lifelong vegetarian with an interest in climate resilience, clean tech and food justice. You can contact her at mary@triplepundit.com or @mary_mazzoni on Twitter.

Recent Articles

7 Things You Need to Know About the Sustainable Seafood Movement

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 30th, 2014 | 0 Comments

Lobster_Tagged_5_1-300x224With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

You may have noticed things getting a little fishy here at Triple Pundit over the past few months, as we dive into the environmental and social impact of the seafood industry in an in-depth series. You can explore the series here to read each post in full. But in case you’re pressed for time (it is Friday after all), this list will give you the need-to-know facts and trends in the burgeoning sustainable seafood movement. Give it a read, and impress your friends at the oyster bar happy hour after work.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Inside Aquaculture: All About the Feed

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 30th, 2014 | 0 Comments

“We see one of the important components of our business as fish nutrition,” Norman McCowan, CEO of Bell Aquaculture, told us on a recent visit to the company’s fish farm in Redkey, Indiana.

Out of all animal proteins, fish has the most favorable feed conversion ratio (FCR). Sometimes called feed to weight ratio, this figure refers to the amount of feed (in kilograms) it takes an animal to convert to weight. Beef, for example, requires 7 kilograms of feed to gain 1 kilogram of weight, while fish can be closer to a one-to-one ratio.

However, when it comes to aquaculture, the topic of feed is a bit more controversial–especially when it comes to farming carnivorous species. In earlier, less sustainable aquaculture endeavors, carnivorous fish were often given feed containing high proportions of fish protein, often derived from wild caught fish–which, as one may guess, kind of defeats the purpose of using aquaculture to combat overfishing while meeting the world’s growing demand for fish.

But Bell, as we were happy to discover, is not one of those fish farms. The company devotes a good chunk of its time and resources to developing the most nutritious and sustainable feed possible. Taking things a step further, Bell acquired Integral Fish Foods out of Grand Junction, Colorado in 2013, allowing the company to directly control the feed it uses.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Wireless Innovation Project Competition Awards Change-Makers in the Mobile Space

Mary Mazzoni
| Thursday May 29th, 2014 | 0 Comments
June, director of the Vodafone Americas Foundation, and Bruce S. Kahn, founder of --the first place winner of this year's Wireless Innovation Project Competition.

June Sugiyama, director of the Vodafone Americas Foundation, and Bruce S. Kahn, member of the Scientific Advisory Board at MobileOCT–the first place winner of this year’s Wireless Innovation Project Competition.

It’s been said that there’s an app for everything these days, so why should the world’s most pressing challenges be any different?

That’s the message behind the Vodafone Americas Foundation’s Wireless Innovation Project Competition (WIP). Developed by June Sugiyama, director of the foundation, WIP has provided funding for a range of wireless technology innovations–awarding more than $2 million to universities, nonprofits and NGOs since its inception in 2009.

Applicants can win from a total prize fund of $600,000 for innovative mobile solutions that have potential to solve critical global issues. The technology developed by past WIP winners is poised to impact poverty, health, environment, disaster relief and technology access around the world.

This year’s eight finalists, who were recognized at a reception in Redwood City, Calif. on April 1, presented mobile-based solutions to a range of critical issues–from addressing deforestation and improving communication during natural disasters to diagnosing illnesses quickly and non-invasively.

Vodafone Americas Foundation announced the winners today during the Social Innovation Summit 2014, being held at the United Nations Plaza, and it’s tough not to get excited about their ideas.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Inside Bell Aquaculture: A Holistic Approach to Sustainable Seafood

Mary Mazzoni
| Wednesday May 28th, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Triple Pundit founder Nick Aster and I drive to Redkey, Indiana to visit Bell Aquaculture‘s farm and facilities, it’s hard not to let my mind wander as I stare out the window into the lush, rural countryside. Here in America’s heartland, farmers grow everything from corn and soy to apples, oats and peppermint, to feed hungry mouths across the country. But as an ever-expanding list of studies show, it will prove more and more difficult to feed a growing population with the methods we now use.

As I gaze listlessly across the vast expanse of our nation’s breadbasket, I can’t help but wonder what will become of these peaceful prairies and quiet towns as populations boom and farmers struggle to keep up. These quasi-apocalyptic musings may seem like a bit of a downer on an otherwise warm and sunny morning, but my mind is put instantly at ease upon meeting Bell’s CEO, Norman McCowan.

An unassuming man with a smooth Southern accent and warm, friendly eyes, McCowan takes the agricultural challenges of a resource constrained world not as a catastrophe, but as a challenge to create a better, stronger and more sustainable system. His company, Bell Aquaculture, is looking to redefine fish farming as an ecologically sound solution to humanity’s growing demand for seafood–and protein in general, in a larger sense.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 10 Budding Trends in Sustainable Fashion

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 23rd, 2014 | 0 Comments
By the end of 2013, Levi’s found a second use for 7.9 million bottles in its Waste<Less line of jeans.

Trend #8: Reuse and Upcycling: By the end of 2013, Levi’s found a second use for 7.9 million bottles in its Waste<Less line of jeans.

With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

Over the past few months, we’ve been exploring the environmental and social impact of fashion in an in-depth series, so we have our eyes peeled for budding trends. From reuse and upcycling to addressing supply chain worker rights, here are 10 that caught our attention.

1. Fair Trade makes a difference in more ways than one

Perhaps best known for certification in coffee, Fair Trade is a market-based approach to improving the lives of farmers and workers, protecting the environment, and delivering quality and safety. At its core, Fair Trade puts people at the center of sustainability.

Whether on a farm or in a factory, participants must adhere to rigorous standards, covering areas such as safe working conditions, grievance procedures, freedom from harassment, regulated work hours, absence of child labor, freedom of association and environmental best practices. As a result, workers make more money and feel empowered–but those aren’t the only benefits.

Read more here.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Q&A: Andrew Winston on Climate Risk, CSR and His New Book ‘The Big Pivot’

Mary Mazzoni
| Wednesday May 21st, 2014 | 1 Comment
Author, speaker, consultant and green business strategy expert Andrew Winston talks to TriplePundit about his new book, "The Big Pivot."

Author, speaker, consultant and green business strategy expert Andrew Winston talks to TriplePundit about his new book, “The Big Pivot.”

It seems the topic of resilience is coming up more and more on the heels of the latest three-part report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Pundits, business leaders and journalists are asking questions like: How can we keep up with an increasing population? What does the threat of climate change mean for our society, and how can we remain resilient? Is it possible to prosper in a resource constrained world?

These are just a few of the issues addressed by author, speaker and consultant Andrew Winston in his new book, “The Big Pivot.” While most conversations surrounding resilience to climate change and resource constraints end in hypotheticals and not much else, Winston’s argument is concise and constructive. In less than 300 pages, he not only breaks down the risks businesses face in a changing world, but also provides clear direction on the strategies and tactics that will help companies meet these risks head on.

I had a chance to speak with Winston, who also advises some of the world’s biggest companies on environmental strategy, about his new book–and the mega-challenges that are on everyone’s minds.

TriplePundit: When did you decide this was a story you wanted to tell and this was the time you wanted to tell it?

Andrew Winston: It was after Hurricane Sandy in the fall of 2012 that I felt that I really wanted to say something more than I’ve said before. I hadn’t written a book for a few years at least; “Green Recovery” came out in 2009. And I just felt that the science has been getting harsher and clearer over the last couple of years. It was pretty clear already, but it got clearer. Then with things like Hurricane Sandy–and that was a personal thing because I was in the middle of it in Connecticut–the urgency kind of hit me. I kind felt like we’re running out of time–that the impacts of climate in particular are right now, and the resource constraint stories were starting to really pop up as well. These two related mega-challenges were just kind of taking over and becoming serious threats to our society.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 10 Companies That Are Actually Listening to Customers About Controversial Ingredients

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 16th, 2014 | 1 Comment
Mars Inc. recently

Mars Inc. recently announced its commitment to transition to 100 percent certified sustainable palm oil in its products by the end of 2014. But it’s not the only one making bold moves in sustainable sourcing.

With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

From the ongoing debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to ingredients lists so complicated they should come with a scientific dictionary, consumers are becoming increasingly active about the ingredients in their favorite food and personal care products. While many companies turn a deaf hear to customers’ requests for transparency, some are heeding the call and taking steps toward sustainable ingredients sourcing.

Here are 10 of our favorite success stories (and one cautionary tale that shows what not to do).

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: Top 5 Corporate Bike-to-Work Incentives in the U.S.

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 9th, 2014 | 1 Comment

patagonia bike to workWith a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

We all know that biking to work is a great way to cut back on carbon emissions. But in case a trimmer waistline and a lighter footprint isn’t enough motivation for busy commuters, a growing number of companies are sweetening the deal with perks and incentives designed to get employees pedaling. Here are five of our favorites.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 10 Companies Thriving in American Downtowns

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday May 2nd, 2014 | 1 Comment
Downtown Container Park, which includes this treehouse for kids, is one of many newly opened businesses in downtown Las Vegas spurred by a $350 million private fund.

Downtown Containerpark, which is made from shipping containers and includes this cool treehouse for kids, is one of many newly opened businesses in downtown Las Vegas spurred by a $350 million private fund.

With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

The migration of major companies from urban downtowns to surrounding suburbs has spanned decades. Across the U.S., commuters sit idly in traffic jams while cities become blighted by decreased business activity and population loss. But as more Americans move back to once-forgotten urban centers, top companies are doing the same — bolstering their bottom lines and revitalizing downtowns in the process.

1. Zappo’s CEO is turning Las Vegas into startup paradise

In 2011, Zappo’s CEO Tony Hsieh announced he was starting a $350 million fund to transform a blighted stretch of downtown Las Vegas into a hotspot for young entrepreneurs. Hsieh has big dreams with his Downtown Project – from “empowering people to follow their passions” to creating a “vibrant, connected urban core” and the “co-working capital of the world” — but with $200 million allocated to real estate development alone, he has a solid shot at making it happen.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 7 Eco Apps That Are Actually Worth Downloading

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday April 25th, 2014 | 3 Comments
GiveO2 helps Android and iOS users track their carbon footprints and support sustainable projects around the world.

GiveO2 helps Android and iOS users track their carbon footprints and support sustainable projects around the world.

With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

Whether you’re on iOS or Android, your app store is likely crowded with “green” applications, each claiming to be next big thing. Sounds great and all, but on closer examination most of these apps receive dismal reviews and often aren’t worth the download space. To save you some time scouring the app store, this week 3p rounded up seven apps that are actually useful for reducing environmental impact and spending your dollar where it counts.

1. GiveO2

In a crowd of carbon footprint trackers, GiveO2 stands out. Debuted at SXSW 2013, this bilingual app for iOs and Android allows users to easily monitor the carbon footprint of their daily commutes — whether it’s by car, bike, public transit or a combination of the three. The app works with your GPS so you don’t have to worry about typing in miles manually, and, miraculously, it also promises not to drain your battery life.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

SAP’s ‘Autism at Work’ Initiative: An Insatiable Appetite for Improvement

Mary Mazzoni
| Thursday April 24th, 2014 | 0 Comments
A candidate in SAP's Autism at Work program uses robotics technology to demonstrate problem-solving skills and creativity while adjusting to a new work environment.

A candidate in SAP’s Autism at Work program uses robotics technology to demonstrate problem-solving skills and creativity while adjusting to a new work environment.

In May of last year, SAP announced the launch of Autism at Work – a unique global initiative to employ people with autism.  The ultimate goal of the program is to have 1 percent of the company’s total work force, or about 650 people in today’s numbers, represent people on the autism spectrum by 2020. Beyond these hard figures, the software solutions giant hopes to achieve what it calls “on-boarding equivalency,” meaning that the company has reached a point that it takes the same amount of effort to hire and train a candidate with autism as someone who is not on the spectrum, Jose Velasco, who heads up the program for SAP in the U.S., told Triple Pundit.

“Our idea is that we want to reach that level of maturity within the organization by 2020 — hopefully before that,” Velasco explained.

To achieve its goal, the company embarked on several pilot programs around the globe and has already hired seven candidates on the spectrum in Germany, as well as three candidates in Ireland. This year, the pilot will extend to two of the company’s facilities in Canada, as well as two locations here in the U.S. — comprising seven to nine candidates who are starting work at the company’s Palo Alto, Calif. and Newtown Square, Pa. facilities. All totaled, the company will hire 14 candidates on the autism spectrum by the end of April, with plans to extend the pilot to Brazil later this year.

“We very strongly believe that in order for us to get better at employing people in the spectrum we have to start by walking first,” Velasco said. “Throughout the year of 2014, we’ll continue to learn. We’ll design our processes, fortify our processes …. And towards the beginning of next year, we’ll start hiring more people on a larger scale.”

This is all fantastic news, but you may be wondering: Why is SAP doing this in the first place? Surely the company’s status allows it to take its pick from top candidates in the IT field, so why rock the boat? Velasco boils it down to one central corporate philosophy: “An insatiable appetite for improvement”.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Tell Us About Your Favorite B Corp for a Chance to Win $100 at Indigenous

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday April 18th, 2014 | 0 Comments

B-the-Change-StampWith a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

According to the nonprofit B Lab, “B Corp certification is to sustainable business what Fair Trade certification is to coffee or USDA Organic certification is to milk.”

We at Triple Pundit received our B Corporation status last month — joining more than 950 other forward-thinking companies across all industries that are are well known for their positive impacts on both people and planet.

Now, we want to hear from you. What’s your favorite B Corp? Tell us about it on social media for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Indigenous.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 10 Clever (and Conscious) Ad Campaigns That Won the Internet

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday April 11th, 2014 | 0 Comments
Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

With a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every FridayTriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

It’s tough to deliver a truly great ad campaign these days.  The good news is that despite an an ever-expanding sea of competition, ads that appeal to social consciousness are cutting through the crowd. With that in mind, this week we’re featuring 10 clever and socially conscious ad campaigns that won the Internet.

1. U.N. Women’s Autocomplete campaign

Released late last year, this ad campaign rocked the Web by featuring portraits of women with discriminatory Google autocomplete results covering their mouths. The campaign, developed as a creative idea for U.N. Women by Memac Ogilvy and Mather Dubai, features portraits of women with autocomplete results for search terms like “women should” and “women shouldn’t” covering their mouths. The results were disturbing, with responses like women should “be in the kitchen” and women shouldn’t “have rights.”

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

3p Weekend: 10 Companies You May Be Surprised Still Manufacture in the U.S.

Mary Mazzoni
| Friday April 4th, 2014 | 3 Comments

6086524367_46261c3e10_zWith a busy week behind you and the weekend within reach, there’s no shame in taking things a bit easy on Friday afternoon. With this in mind, every Friday TriplePundit will give you a fun, easy read on a topic you care about. So, take a break from those endless email threads, and spend five minutes catching up on the latest trends in sustainability and business.

“Made in the U.S.A” isn’t exactly the norm these days. More than 97 percent of apparel and 98 percent of shoes sold in the U.S. are made overseas, compared to 5 percent in the 1960s. Nevertheless, a 2013 poll found that 78 percent of Americans would rather buy an American product if given the opportunity.

We can all rattle off a few small, niche companies that manufacture on this side of the pond (and everyone knows those Chryslers are “Imported from Detroit”), but do any other big names manufacture in the U.S. anymore? Surprisingly, yes. 

Read Full Article » Discuss This »

Interview: Brandon Tidwell on Darden Restaurants’ 2013 Citizenship Update

Mary Mazzoni
| Thursday April 3rd, 2014 | 0 Comments

Darden Harvest1Earlier this year, Darden Restaurants, the Fortune 500 restaurant giant known for brands like Red Lobster, Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse and Bahama Breeze, released its 2013 Citizenship Update – which includes some pretty impressive numbers related to sustainability, culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR). With more than 2,100 restaurants in its portfolio, the world’s largest full-service restaurant operating company is making it clear that sustainability is a priority in its latest report.

Thanks to water reduction efforts that have been in place since 2009, Darden achieved its water reduction goal of 15 percent less per restaurant two years early. The company also set a goal to shrink energy use by 15 percent per restaurant by 2015 (compared to a 2008 baseline), which it is well on the way to achieving with a 12.3 percent drop as of last year, according the update.

As of 2013, the company’s Darden Harvest program, which sends fresh food that isn’t served to community food banks across the U.S. and Canada, has donated more than 66 million pounds of food with a fair market value of nearly $600 million since its inception in 2004. The company is also making waves in sustainable seafood sourcing, an increasingly important issue as ocean health concerns mount. Last year Darden bought 100 percent of its shrimp, 85 percent of its salmon and 80 percent of its tilapia and catfish according to the Global Aquaculture Alliance Standards.

I recently the chance to chat with Brandon Tidwell, manager of sustainability for Darden Restaurants, about the latest Citizenship Update and where the company is headed when it comes to sustainability.

Read Full Article » Discuss This »