3p Contributor: Mike Hower

Mike Hower Mike Hower is a writer, thinker and strategic communicator most interested in the intersection of sustainable business and public policy. Currently based in Washington, D.C., he is a graduate research fellow at The George Washington University, where he is pursuing a masters degree in Media & Public Affairs and researching the impact of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) on policy, governance, and sustainable development. He has spent time working for the United States Congress in Washington, D.C., helping Silicon Valley startups with strategic communications, and teaching in South America. In addition to his ongoing contributions to Triple Pundit, Mike also regularly writes for Sustainable Brands. He is hopelessly addicted to travel and has a borderline unhealthy obsession with his golden retriever, Gerico. You can connect with him on LinkedIn or follow him on Twitter (@mikehower).

Recent Articles

Why ‘Made in America’ Does Not Have to Mean ‘Unaffordable’

Mike Hower
| Wednesday December 11th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Upstate Stock

Photo Credit: Upstate Stock

“Made in America” labels aren’t exactly a common sight these days. Check the tag on the shirt or pants you are wearing, and chances are it will read “Made in… [China], [Bangladesh], [Vietnam] or…” Well, you get the point. Your flashy new iPhone 5S? Before you even opened the box, it already was more well-traveled than you are.

More than 97 percent of apparel and 98 percent of shoes sold in the U.S. are made overseas, according to the American Apparel & Footwear Association. Contrast this with the 1960s, when around 95 percent of apparel worn in the U.S. was made at home.

But most American consumers want to buy American. Given a choice between a product made in the U.S. and an identical one made abroad, 78 percent of Americans would rather buy the American product, according to a February 2013 survey by the Consumer Reports National Research Center.

Why? In the same survey, more than 80 percent cited retaining manufacturing jobs and keeping American manufacturing strong in the global economy as very important reasons for buying American. Roughly 60 percent claimed concern about the use of child workers or other cheap labor overseas, or stated that American-made goods were of higher quality.

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Delta Air Lines Joins Oil Industry Groups to Fight EPA Biofuel Mandates

Mike Hower
| Friday December 6th, 2013 | 1 Comment
Photo Credit: Flickr James Wang

Photo Credit: Flickr James Wang

Delta Air Lines recently joined other oil industry trade groups to fight the U.S. biofuel mandate that requires refiners to meet an annual biofuel quota, either through production or through the purchase of credits.

The airline filed a lawsuit through its year-old refiner, Monroe Energy, in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit that challenges the EPA’s 2013 renewable fuel requirements, according to FuelFix.

Under the EPA policy, refiners generate renewable identification numbers (basically, compliance credits) for every gallon of biofuel they incorporate. Monroe’s status as a “merchant refiner” that sells unblended products to wholesale marketers means it must always purchase credits. The refiner, in its Oct. 4 federal court petition, claimed this forces it to spend millions of dollars to acquire compliance credits at what it says are “artificially inflated” prices.

Monroe’s chief financial officer Frank Pici said in written comments filed with the EPA in June that the agency’s policies are creating winners and losers in the oil industry, with his company on the latter side. The winners will inevitably be vertically integrated refiners that can blend biofuels, and small refiners eligible to seek exemptions from the renewable fuel requirements.

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640,000+ Favorable Comments on SEC Petition for Greater Corporate Political Transparency

Mike Hower
| Wednesday December 4th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Flickr Austen Hufford

Photo Credit: Flickr Austen Hufford

“Corporations are people, my friend,” Governor Mitt Romney told a heckler at the Iowa State Fair during the 2012 Presidential Election. While he later backtracked after widespread backlash (and a major drop in the polls), Romney’s claim was correct – as far as the Supreme Court is concerned.

In January 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310 (2010), that political spending is “a form of protected speech under the First Amendment, and the government may not keep corporations or unions from spending money to support or denounce individual candidates in elections.”

In other words, the Court proclaimed that companies should enjoy the same basic human rights as you and I, giving firms the First Amendment right of freedom of speech – with spending money being a form of speech.

Later that year, in SpeechNow.org v. Federal Election Commission, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia applied the Citizens United ruling in an unprecedented manner, proclaiming that the federal government may not require an unincorporated association that makes only independent expenditures to register and report as a political committee.

The result? The rise of Super PACS (Political Action Committees) as a means of influencing elections, while keeping donors’ personal identities in the dark. While Super PACS are prohibited from donating money directly to political candidates, they can raise unlimited sums of money from corporations, unions, associations and individuals, then spend unlimited amounts to overtly advocate for or against political candidates.

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Sierra Nevada Saves More Than $5M Diverting 99.8% of Waste

Mike Hower
| Tuesday November 26th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Flickr SteveR

Photo Credit: Flickr SteveR

Next time you pop open a Pale Ale, you can feel a little less guilty (not that you ever should). Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. announced last week that it now diverts 99.8 percent of its waste, earning it the first platinum certification from the U.S. Zero Waste Business Council.

This was no mere feel-good eco project, but serious business – the company says its waste-management efforts resulted in $5,398,470 in avoided disposal costs and $903,308 in 2012 revenue. That’s a lot of green.

Additionally, by diverting 51,414 tons from landfill and incineration, Sierra Nevada avoided 11,812 tons of carbon dioxide, according to USZWBC. Last year, Sierra Nevada’s Terrence Sullivan told TriplePundit that the brewery captures and recycles 95 percent of all carbon dioxide produced during fermentation and then reuses it. Not too shabby.

After auditing the Zero Waste diversion processes at Sierra Nevada in Chico, Calif., USZWBC found that the facility is successfully reducing, reusing, recycling and composting at an unprecedented rate.

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Coal Industry Rallies Against Proposed EPA Power Plant Regulations

Mike Hower
| Friday November 22nd, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Flickr oatsy40

Photo Credit: Flickr oatsy40

Nearly 3,000 miners and workers from across the coal industry descended on Capitol Hill late last month to protest President Obama’s alleged “War on Coal” — more specifically the proposed carbon emission rules the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released for new power plants, and will release for existing plants in 2014.

The rules, pursuant of the Clean Air Act, would cap carbon emissions at future coal-fired power plants at 1,100 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour and 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour for new natural gas power plants. With the average coal-fired power plant emitting around 1,800 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour,  both new and existing power plants would be forced to clean up their act.

The rally was organized by the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE), which has a history of opposing climate change legislation. Around 30 members of Congress also attended the event, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and even a few coal-country Democrats.

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Baskets Build Schools, Empower Women in West Africa

Mike Hower
| Thursday November 14th, 2013 | 1 Comment
'Wallam e’ jangde" means “help me learn” in Fulaani, a local Senegalese language.

‘Wallam e’ jangde” means “help me learn” in Fulaani, a local Senegalese language.

Two of the biggest problems afflicting the people of West Africa is a lack of access to education and employment — without the former, the latter is difficult to attain. So says Valerie Lemke, Co-Founder of Jjangde, a social enterprise that strives to hit both issues with one… erm… basket, by connecting handmade goods from rural communities in Senegal to global markets, and using the profits to fund schools in the communities where the goods were made.

The company’s curious name is derived from the phrase Wallam e’ jangde, which means “help me learn” in Fulaani, a local Senegalese language.

“I started Jjangde in hopes to change the ‘buy one and give one to a child in need’ model,” said Lemke. “I wanted to create a social enterprise that focused on a hand-up and not a handout. With Jjangde’s full-circle of development, we hope to change this model.”

Nearly half of rural Senegalese children drop out of school before the age of 12, and a mere two percent of girls attend high school, Jjangde says. By providing families with additional income opportunities, the company hopes more children will be free to attend school rather than remain on family farms to help make ends meet. With many villages lacking schools of their own, Jjangde uses 100 percent of its profits to build locally-run schools in the communities where it operates, with the ultimate goal of establishing a culture of formal education the region currently lacks.

“Providing Senegalese children with the opportunity and culture to stay in school remains key to opening up their futures to other avenues and changing the prescribed expectations of low wages for livelihood,” Lemke said.

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Does a ‘Political Gene’ Determine if We Are Liberal or Conservative?

Mike Hower
| Friday November 8th, 2013 | 0 Comments
Image Credit: Outside the Beltway

Image Credit: Outside the Beltway

It is often said that we tend to adopt our parents’ political leanings, but what if we actually inherited them?

That’s not to say we evolved to be liberal or conservative. Our early human ancestors were more concerned with hunting and gathering and not getting eaten by bears than they were with elections, Gallup polls and hating on Obamacare.

But it is safe to say that the ideologies associated with each political leaning goes well beyond the ballot box.

In 2008, researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, conducted a study with a group of 26 adults with “strong political beliefs” to determine if there was a correlation between physical sensitivities and political beliefs. The researchers discovered that individuals with lower physical sensitivities to sudden noises and threatening visual images were more likely to support “liberal” issues such as foreign aid, open immigration policies, pacifism, and gun control, while those displaying higher physiological reactions to those same stimuli were more likely to favor “conservative” issues such as high defense spending, capital punishment, patriotism, and the Iraq War.

The research indicated that people who have strong basic emotional responses to threats tend to develop more conservative political views.

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Climate Change Inaction Costs Taxpayers Billions

Mike Hower
| Friday November 1st, 2013 | 0 Comments
Hurricane Sandy From Space.

Hurricane Sandy From Space.
Photo Credit: NASA

There is a lingering perception that investing in technologies, initiatives and processes aimed at countering climate change is just another drain on already troubled U.S. taxpayers. But what about the cost of inaction?

According to a new report by Ceres, extreme weather events cost the United States $100 billion in 2012, most of which went towards federal crop, flood, wildfire and disaster relief. While naysayers continue to claim weather events like Hurricane Sandy and climate change are unrelated, scientists agree that climate change exacerbates extreme weather events. They predict that the intensity and frequency of these events will only increase as the planet warms up.

With only 50 percent of the damages in the U.S. caused by extreme weather events privately insured, the  federal and state governments are left to pick up the rest, the report says. However, public disaster relief and recovery programs have been slow to recognize that worsening climate impacts will drive up future losses to unsustainable levels. Rather than encouraging behavior that reduces risks from extreme weather events, these programs continue to encourage behavior that increases these risks – such as agricultural practices that increase vulnerability to drought and new development in hurricane- and wildfire-prone areas.

“Taxpayers should be outraged that their tax dollars are incentivizing high risk behavior that increases federal disaster costs,” said Steve Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense. “Especially in light of increased risks in the future, policymakers need to reorient federal policies to encourage mitigation and prerespond to the disasters we know we face.”

“Every dime spent on disaster responses should help ensure we don’t have to spend that dime in the future,” Ellis added.

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Businesses Denounce Austerity, Urge Congress to Invest in Sustainable Economy

Mike Hower
| Wednesday October 23rd, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Flicker Ben Schueddekopf

Photo Credit: Flicker Ben Schueddekopf

The Capitol Hill standoff between Democrats and House Republicans may be over (for now), but more than 165,000 businesses say the budget deal reached by Congress last week does not go far enough to address the underlying economic problems afflicting the nation. The American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) has called for policymakers to stop imposing austerity and begin making strategic investments to foster a sustainable economy.

The U.S. government has a long history of making such tactical investments, which led to breakthroughs in transportation (federal highway system, commercial aviation), energy (nuclear, the Tennessee Valley Authority), information (semiconductors, the Internet), and medical (the National Institutes of Health).

Continuing to invest in areas like upgrading the energy grid and aging infrastructure are needed to kick-start U.S. leadership in important new technologies, which will drive job creation and raise the overall efficiency and innovation of the economy, ASBC claims.

Unfortunately, the government currently is doing the exact opposite with austerity measures imposed by the sequester, which took effect March 1. This slashed federal spending by $85 million in the remainder of the 2013, affecting mostly education, defense and social programs. An additional $1.1 trillion will be cut over the next decade.

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Startup Develops Eco-Friendly Material to Replace Wood and Plastic

Mike Hower
| Wednesday October 16th, 2013 | 1 Comment

dsdsfAustralian-based materials company Zeoform claims to have developed a new material made of cellulose fiber and water, which has the potential to replace plastic and wood in a variety of applications.

The company says the 100 percent non-toxic material has the beauty of wood, the strength of fiberglass and the versatility of plastic.

On October 11, Zeoform launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise $10 million in 30 days. The company says it plans to promote its campaign later this month at the LA Green Festival. Raising such a hefty sum in such little time is not unheard of – both MIT’s Form1 3D Printer raised $3 million and the Pebble Watch raised $10 million in 30 days.

Zeoform says it plans to use the funds to construct a “Center of Excellence” educational facility and R&D factory – scheduled for completion in 2014.

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CEOs Report Frustrated Sustainability Ambition

Mike Hower
| Tuesday October 15th, 2013 | 1 Comment

Screen Shot 2013-10-14 at 12.06.39 AMMore than two thirds of CEOs (67 percent) believe that business is not doing enough to address global sustainability challenges, while the same percentage report that the private sector is not making sufficient efforts to address global sustainability challenges, according to a survey by the United Nations Global Compact and Accenture.

The survey of 1,000 CEOs found that most believe the failure to make a link between sustainability and business value is the fastest growing barrier of the past ten years, and are calling for increased incentives and rewards for sustainability leaders seeking to embed sustainability throughout their organizations.

For more than half of respondents, a lack of financial resources is cited as the leading barrier to advancing sustainability; 40 percent say that economic conditions have made it tough to embed sustainability into core business. In 2007, 18 percent said this deterred them from taking further action, rising to 30 percent in 2010 and 37 percent this year.

According to the survey, only 15 percent of CEOs think business has made good progress over the last three years in making sustainability a must-have factor for consumers, however 82 percent believe this is critical to harnessing sustainability as a transformative force in the economy. Almost half (46 percent) say consumers will always consider sustainability as secondary to price, quality and availability.

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Top Execs Receive $24 Billion From Federal Contracts Each Year

Mike Hower
| Wednesday October 2nd, 2013 | 0 Comments
Photo Credit: Flickr eGuide Travel

Photo Credit: Flickr eGuide Travel

Speaking of federal government spending, new research from think tank Demos has found that the current contracting practices from the federal government pays top corporate executives nearly $24 billion per year. Of course, only time will tell if these bills will actually get paid during the current federal government shutdown.

The organization postulates that if these contracting policies were reformed to limit the taxpayer contribution to executive pay at the salary of the U.S. Vice President ($230,700), then full-time workers could potentially receive an annual pay increase of nearly $14,000, with no additional cost to taxpayers.

Demos points to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) finding that taxpayers currently subsidize more than $760,000 per year toward the compensation of contracting executives, who often earn millions of dollars annually — more than half a million dollars more than what the Vice President makes.

The GAO numbers indicate that between $20.8 and $23.9 billion each year goes to executive pay at the companies that contract with the government. The think tank says that recouping close to $7 billion of the total that goes to pay above the Vice Presidential salary mark would free up enough taxpayer money to raise wages at those companies by up to $6.69 per hour, or $13,902 per year for a full-time employee.

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Responsible Forestry: Can Certification Save Our Forests?

Mike Hower
| Tuesday October 1st, 2013 | 1 Comment
Photo Credit: Flickr CIFOR

Photo Credit: Flickr CIFOR

It’s tough not to feel a sense of sorrow when watching recent images of the California Rimfire, which has so far scorched more than 250,000 acres of the heavily-forested Sierra Nevada mountains. There is something about a forest that beckons us — a connection that runs millions of years into our evolutionary past.

In modern times, the demands of “progress” often have reduced our perception of trees to mere commodities. We need lumber, pulp for paper and land for specialized agriculture. If the principles of sustainable forest management are not respected, these requirements can lead to sanctioned deforestation or degradation of forests’ inherent qualities. Unfortunately, many of these activities now take place in some of the poorest regions of the world where few government protections are in place. Where regulations do exist, illegal deforestation runs rampant in the form of unsanctioned logging, cattle ranching and subsistence land-clearing.

Some claim that the best thing for the world’s forests would be for humans to simply leave them alone — no more logging or land clearing of any kind. Realistically, we know that economic demands will never allow that. Further, absent human involvement, natural disasters (fire, storms, pests and diseases) will take their toll sooner or later on untouched forests as a part of nature’s regenerative cycles. So it is safe to say that humans will be utilizing forests’ ecosystem services now and in the future.  Can we find a middle ground to maintain the health of the forests and also use them responsibly for present and future generations?

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Uber Offers Free Rides to Level Lyft

Mike Hower
| Wednesday September 11th, 2013 | 7 Comments
Photo Credit: Flickr Alfredo Mendez

Photo Credit: Flickr Alfredo Mendez

Mere weeks after securing a staggering $258 million in new funding from Google Ventures and TPG Capital, car-booking service, Uber, is already training its venture-infused guns on its closest competitor – Lyft.

In response to Lyft’s launch in St. Paul, Phoenix and Indianapolis last week, Uber announced that it is offering free rides in these cities from UberX — the lower-cost version of its premium booking service. Uber says it is counting on consumers to favor its upscale-style offering over Lyft’s more informal pink-mustache and fist-bump-filled rides.

Earlier this year, Uber launched a “Shave the Stache” campaign, which featured Lyft-bashing ads plastered on the sides of trucks and, perhaps ironically, city buses. The ads criticized Lyft’s “donation” approach to payment and sought to convince drivers to switch to Uber.

Despite the Uber threat, Lyft remains in high spirits. On Monday at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, Lyft President John Zimmer said the company will rely on its (often quirky) community to build a larger user base. In other words, the pink mustaches and obligatory fist-bumps are here to stay.

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Tesla Tops CA Sales, Rated Safest Car of All Time

Mike Hower
| Monday September 2nd, 2013 | 1 Comment
Photo Credit: Flickr Jeff Cooper

Photo Credit: Flickr Jeff Cooper

Tesla Motors is on a roll. Just months after paying off its Department of Energy loan nine years ahead of schedule, the California electric carmaker has received a 5-star safety rating in every subcategory from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), making it part of the one percent of all vehicles tested by the federal government to achieve a perfect score.

Tesla’s Tony Stark-esque CEO, Elon Musk, has been quick to point out that although NHTSA does not publish a star rating above 5, safety levels better than five stars are captured in the overall Vehicle Safety Score (VSS) provided to manufacturers, where the Model S achieved a new combined record of 5.4 stars.

The Model S also set a new record for the lowest likelihood of injury to occupants, Musk says. Though the Model S is a sedan, it exceeded the safety score of all SUVs and minivans, which takes into account the probability of injury from front, side, rear and rollover accidents.

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