Raz Godelnik

Raz Godelnik is an Assistant Professor and the Co-Director of the MS in Strategic Design & Management program at Parsons School of Design in New York. Currently, his research projects focus on the impact of the sharing economy on traditional business, the sharing economy and cities’ resilience, the future of design thinking, and the integration of sustainability into Millennials’ lifestyles. Raz is the co-founder of two green startups – Hemper Jeans and Eco-Libris and holds an MBA from Tel Aviv University.


My 2014 Sustainability Moment of Optimism

When I talk about optimism, I’m not talking about burying your head in the sand or daydreaming about a utopian future, but about a very realistic “hopefulness and confidence about the future,” which is exactly what I found in September at TED@Unilever.


Why Uber is Not Part of the Sharing Economy

I know that it might sound a bit strange, as Uber is one of the more common examples of the sharing economy. But bear with me for a minute while I try to make the case.

Zappos Office Tour

Want Better Stock Returns? Invest in Employee Satisfaction

How much is a happy employee really worth? I bet many companies still ask themselves this question, wondering what the real value of employee satisfaction is. Fortunately, the academia is here to help with a new study looking at the relationship between employee satisfaction and stock returns, using lists of the “Best Companies to Work For” in 14 countries as their database.


Biomimicry Lessons for Business

At an event entitled “Biomimicry + the Regenerative Economy” held in New York City last week, experts Amy Larkin and Katherine Collins share lessons business can learn from nature.


More Millennials Are Living With Their Parents: Is It Hurting the Economy?

A growing number of millennials are living with their parents. This is good news, right? Millennials seem to adopt a more responsible economic behavior, avoiding the same reckless financial decisions that got so many people in trouble only a few years ago. Well, not so fast. The reports on this trend widely present it as a problem rather than an opportunity. Why? Because by not buying houses, millennials are hurting the real estate recovery and a weak housing market has been a burden on the U.S. economic growth.


Is Uber Exploitative? And What Does It Say About the Sharing Economy?

Some questions the legitimacy or fairness of Uber’s business tactics, especially given the fact that it operates in many places within a “grey area” of the law. Yet, behind these arguments lie even more fundamental questions: Is Uber still considered part of the sharing economy? Is it exploitative? And if you answer ‘yes’ to both questions, what does it say about the sharing economy?


Report Shows the Benefits of Cradle to Cradle Certification, But Is It Enough?

The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute recently commissioned Trucost, a leading global environmental data and insight company, to determine the value of C2C certification for companies. The result is a 145-page report in which Trucost presents its analysis of 10 C2C-certified products from different companies (and industries), including Aveda, Desso, Ecover, PUMA, Shaw Industries, Steelcase and Van Houtum.


Is it Time to Stop Calling Uber a Disruptive Innovation?

While obviously Uber seems to meet the definition of disruptive innovation as most people understand this concept, it would be interesting to see if Uber actually meets the criteria for disruptive innovation defined by the person who actually coined and popularized the term – Prof. Clayton M. Christensen.

Harvard Business School's Michael E. Porter delivers the keynote at the 2014 Shared Value Leadership Summit.

Can Shared Value Successfully Connect ‘Davos Men’ with the ‘Square People’?

Earlier this month Thomas Friedman wrote on the New York Times about two very different groups trying to shape the economic environment worldwide. The first was “Davos men”–the “transnational, cosmopolitan elite drawn from high-tech, finance, multinationals, academics and NGOs,” who regularly attend the Davos World Economic Forum. The second group was the “square people”–according to Friedman, it includes mostly young people, who are aspiring to a higher standard of living and more liberty, seeking either reform or revolution in their country (depending on their existing government) and “demanding a new social contract.”