Raz Godelnik

Raz Godelnik is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management at Parsons The New School for Design. His research interests include the convergence of innovation, sustainability, business and design strategies, as well as the sharing economy, sustainable business models and design thinking. Currently he is involved in projects focusing on the impact of the sharing economy on traditional business, resilience and the sharing economy, future of design thinking, and whether Millennials can integrate sustainability into their lifestyles.Raz is the co-founder of two green startups (Hemper Jeans and Eco-Libris) and a contributor writer to Triple Pundit.

Shannon Schuyler_Photo

Interview: Shannon Schuyler on PwC’s Best Employee Engagement Program, Project Belize

Meet Project Belize, PwC’s international development leadership program. Since 2008, the firm’s professionals at all levels, from interns to senior partners, travel to Belize City every year to host financial literacy camps, provide scholarships to students, train teachers and principals, and build educational playgrounds.

2013 Net Impact Conference

Why Sustainable MBAs Should Work for ExxonMobil and JP Morgan

Sustainable MBA students want to work for responsible companies like Unilever, Nike, SAP and M&S, but what about the ‘bad’ guys? Wouldn’t it make more sense for these MBAs to take a job at the ExxonMobils, JP Morgans, BPs, Monsantos, and Lockheed Martins of the world?

fracking demonstration in Colorado

Forget Sustainable Consumption. Focus on Sustainable Citizenship

While the sustainable business world keeps focusing on ways to increase sustainable consumption as a path to a more sustainable future, when we look at reality we see a clear pattern – systemic changes that make or will make a difference are derived by sustainable citizenship, not sustainable consumption.

crowded day at Costco

Black Friday: News Articles about Early Openings Miss the Point

This year a number of retailers are opening their stores on Thanksgiving even earlier than they did last year. At the same time, we also have a few retailers, including Costco and Nordstrom, that decided to close their stores all day on Thanksgiving.

THE WORLD WE MADE

Book Review: Jonathon Porritt Sends Us Postcards from 2050

Jonathon Porritt’s new book ‘The World We Made’ provides us a detailed look not just into what the world could look in 2050, but also on the journey there. The good news is that if we play our cards right, we can find ourselves in 2050 in “a world that works well for the vast majority of people.” The bad news is that the way there is going to be messy and not very pleasant for many.

broccoli vs

Sustainability Needs a Broccoli-Style Extreme Makeover

New York Times’ Michael Moss posed a challenge to the ad agency Victors & Spoils: How would you get people to want to buy and eat more broccoli? The result was a great campaign that gave broccoli an extreme makeover this vegetable could only dream about. This made me wonder – if it can work for broccoli, could it also work for sustainability?

BSR/GlobeScan report

Four Lessons from BSR/GlobeScan State of Sustainable Business Survey

Last week, BSR and GlobeScan published their fifth annual State of Sustainable Business Survey report. One of the world’s largest annual surveys of corporate sustainability executives, this report provides an interesting look into the state of sustainability in business.

Jeff Immelt, CEO of GE

Sustainable Business Leaders Call on Obama to Approve the Keystone XL Pipeline

Last week over 150 American companies signed a letter calling President Obama to approve the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. In addition to the usual suspects (aka oil and gas companies), you can find there companies like GE, AT&T, PwC, Siemens, KPMG and Waste Management, which are among the leaders in the business community when it comes to sustainability, and frankly you would expect them to make the case against the pipeline, not lobby for its approval.

prospective employees

Would 69% of Americans Turn Down a Job Due to a Company’s Poor Reputation?

New survey found that 69 percent of Americans would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed. Is it really possible that reputation has become such an important factor that 7 out of 10 people would actually say no to a new job just because they feel the company is not good enough? And if so, what does it mean exactly for companies, especially when it comes to sustainability?