Raz Godelnik

Raz Godelnik is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management at Parsons The New School for Design. His research interests include the convergence of innovation, sustainability, business and design strategies, as welll as the sharing economy, open innovation and sustainable business models. Currently he is involved in projects focusing on the impact of the sharing economy on traditional business, the relationship between sharing economy and resilience, design intelligence, and whether Millennials can integrate sustainability into their lifestyle.Raz is the co-founder of two green startups (Hemper Jeans and Eco-Libris) and a contributor writer to Triple Pundit.

THE WORLD WE MADE

Book Review: Jonathon Porritt Sends Us Postcards from 2050

Jonathon Porritt’s new book ‘The World We Made’ provides us a detailed look not just into what the world could look in 2050, but also on the journey there. The good news is that if we play our cards right, we can find ourselves in 2050 in “a world that works well for the vast majority of people.” The bad news is that the way there is going to be messy and not very pleasant for many.

broccoli vs

Sustainability Needs a Broccoli-Style Extreme Makeover

New York Times’ Michael Moss posed a challenge to the ad agency Victors & Spoils: How would you get people to want to buy and eat more broccoli? The result was a great campaign that gave broccoli an extreme makeover this vegetable could only dream about. This made me wonder – if it can work for broccoli, could it also work for sustainability?

BSR/GlobeScan report

Four Lessons from BSR/GlobeScan State of Sustainable Business Survey

Last week, BSR and GlobeScan published their fifth annual State of Sustainable Business Survey report. One of the world’s largest annual surveys of corporate sustainability executives, this report provides an interesting look into the state of sustainability in business.

Jeff Immelt, CEO of GE

Sustainable Business Leaders Call on Obama to Approve the Keystone XL Pipeline

Last week over 150 American companies signed a letter calling President Obama to approve the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. In addition to the usual suspects (aka oil and gas companies), you can find there companies like GE, AT&T, PwC, Siemens, KPMG and Waste Management, which are among the leaders in the business community when it comes to sustainability, and frankly you would expect them to make the case against the pipeline, not lobby for its approval.

prospective employees

Would 69% of Americans Turn Down a Job Due to a Company’s Poor Reputation?

New survey found that 69 percent of Americans would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed. Is it really possible that reputation has become such an important factor that 7 out of 10 people would actually say no to a new job just because they feel the company is not good enough? And if so, what does it mean exactly for companies, especially when it comes to sustainability?

2013 Aspirational Consumer Index

Can Aspirationals’ Idea of Sustainable Consumption Bring a Better Future?

The new Aspirational Consumer Index offers a fresh glimpse into the rise of the Aspirationals, more than a third of the consumers worldwide who are uniting style, social status and sustainability values to redefine consumption. But is the future shaped by the Aspirationals’ sustainable shopping habits necessarily a sustainable one?

Featured panellists, left-right: Paul Polman, Unilever; Kajol, Help a Child Reach 5 advocate; Karl Hofmann, Population Services International; Jeffrey Sachs, The Earth Institute.

4 Partnership Lessons from Unilever’s Lifebuoy Handwashing Campaign

By the time you finish reading this article (let’s say 5 minutes from now) 20 children around the world will die because of diarrhea or pneumonia. This is 2 million children every year. Unilever’s Lifebuoy wants to change this reality in a new campaign also representing a new era of partnerships.

scarecrow

Is Chipotle’s Scarecrow Film an Example of ‘Disrupt and Delight’ or ‘Disrupt and Dislike’?

This debate over Chipotle’s new Scarecrow film got me thinking – while Chipotle’s campaign obviously tries to present a “disrupt and delight” approach, where the unsustainable status-quo is disrupted in a way that offers consumers delightful solutions, it’s not clear if the result is indeed “disrupt and delight” or “disrupt and dislike.” So which one is it?

ugly fruits

Is There a Business Case for Selling Ugly Fruit and Vegetables?

When was the last time you bought ugly fruit or vegetables? A misshapen cucumber, a deformed carrot, or a discolored zucchini? You probably have hard time remembering because these sorts of ‘ugly’ fruits and vegetables are screened and thrown away before they reach the supermarket’s shelves to ensure customers see only fruits and vegetables with perfect shape, size, and color. A growing number of entrepreneurs and organizations to look for ways to change this unsustainable reality.

Coca Cola Enterprises

The Problem with Coca Cola Enterprises’ ‘Don’t Waste, Create’ Campaign

Hearing about Coca Cola Enterprises’ (CCE) new sustainability initiative in the UK designed to boost the reuse and recycling of plastic bottles, my expectations were pretty high. After all CCE, the largest Coca-Cola bottler in Western Europe, is known to be taking sustainability seriously and is even considered one of the leaders in exploring consumer behavior change. Unfortunately I was dead wrong. If ‘Recycle for the Future’ was all about the future of using brand marketing to encourage recycling, ‘Don’t Waste, Create’ campaign is all about the past and not necessarily in a good way.