3p Contributor: Tina Casey

Tina is a career public information specialist and former Deputy Director of Public Affairs of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, and author of books and articles on recycling and other conservation themes. She writes frequently on sustainable tech issues for Triple Pundit and other websites, with a focus on military, government and corporate sustainability, and she is currently Deputy Director of Public Information for the County of Union, New Jersey. Follow Tina on twitter, @TinaMCasey https://twitter.com/#!/TinaMCasey.

Recent Articles

John Deere Joins $200 Million Push For Next-Generation Electronics

| Thursday January 16th, 2014 | 0 Comments

John Deere partners in next generation electronic chipsThe iconic U.S. firm Deere & Company (more familiarly known as John Deere) has been emerging as a player in the U.S. agriculture industry’s transition to clean technology, and it looks like the company is going to be venturing way off the farm on its next endeavor. John Deere has just been named as one of 18 private sector partners in the new public-private Manufacturing Innovation Institute, launched just yesterday as part of President Obama’s initiatives to boost the U.S. manufacturing sector into next-generation technologies.

The companies will partner with an academic team spearheaded by North Carolina State University in a $70 million effort that also draws in five federal agencies as part of a larger, $200 million initiative establishing a total of three such innovation hubs, announced earlier this year. Along with NASA and the National Science Foundation, the partnership includes the departments of Commerce, Defense and Energy.

At stake is a competitive chunk at the huge potential global market for next-generation electronic chips and related devices that achieve significant gains in both power and energy efficiency.

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Koch Connection to West Virginia Chemical Spill Company

| Tuesday January 14th, 2014 | 22 Comments

Chemical_spill_closed_Foo_ConnerA chemical spill in West Virginia last week cut off access to safe tap water across nine counties, and although it involved a chemical used by the coal industry, state officials have been pushing back strongly against suggestions by reporters that the disaster had anything to do with the state’s dominant industry — coal.

However, the fact is that the chemical industry is also very important to the West Virginia economy, and it is heavily entwined with the coal industry, which requires a substantial quantity of chemicals at various stages before it gets from the mine to its point of use.

Clearly, the spill — which affected 300,000 people and shut down restaurants, schools, hospitals and hundreds of other businesses and institutions — is closely related to the state’s dependency on the coal industry, despite protestations to the contrary.

That, in turn, undermines the coal industry’s insistent positioning of coal as a “clean” fuel. While new technology has reduced pollutants from burning coal, everything around the burn point is still status quo, from destructive mining to fly ash disposal.

With that scenario in mind, let’s take a look at how the disaster is playing out in the local paper, the Charleston Gazette (highly recommended: follow reporter Ken Ward, Jr. on Twitter, @Kenwardjr).

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New York State Seeks Path to Energy Independence

| Monday January 13th, 2014 | 0 Comments

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announces new solar initiativesEnergy independence is a tricky concept, but New York Governor Andrew Cuomo shed some light on the subject in his State of the State address on January 8. He made it clear that the next few years are going to be boom times for the New York solar industry. You won’t find it in the speech as delivered live, but turn to page 70 of the printed text and you will see the outlines of a big, fat, juicy package of initiatives to stimulate the community solar market.

Together, the programs are called Community Solar NY. That’s an important step forward in New York State’s progress toward a more diversified fuel mix, especially in its vast upstate region where the development of more local, distributed solar generating capacity would help to relieve the expense of building new transmission lines.

Speaking of transmission, though Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the downstate New York City area is well documented, the Governor also noted the increased frequency of intense storms battering the upstate region. The development of more distributed solar generating capacity would help to harden the upstate grid against weather related distruptions.

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New AP Report Adds Weight to Pennsylvania Fracking Decision

| Monday January 6th, 2014 | 1 Comment

AP report exposes Pennsylvania fracking complaintsThe Associated Press is out with a major report on recent pollution complaints related to gas and oil fracking in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and Texas. The figures on Pennsylvania fracking are particularly interesting in light of last week’s decision by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. The court held that the state’s new uniform zoning plan for fracking violated a part of the state constitution because it nullified any attempts by local authorities to establish more stringent requirements.

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has appealed the ruling, but its case could be seriously undermined by a renewed focus on evidence that fracking imposes risks and hazards on local communities.

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PA Supreme Court Ruling: No Preferential Treatment for Fracking

| Monday December 23rd, 2013 | 0 Comments

PA supreme court rules against fracking.Environmental groups and local communities in Pennsylvania scored a huge victory on December 20, when the state’s Supreme Court ruled against the establishment of a statewide zoning plan for oil and gas fracking. The anti-fracking ruling affirmed an earlier decision by a lower court to strike down the parts of Act 13, a state law passed just last year, in February 2012.

The state’s Department of Environmental Protection had characterized Act 13 as a positive development that imposed “stronger environmental standards” on fracking, an unconventional drilling method that involves pumping a chemical brine deep underground. However, Act 13 also imposed uniform statewide standards for Pennsylvania fracking that overrode any attempt by local communities to regulate the practice more strictly.

In striking down those parts of Act 13 creating a statewide zoning plan, the Supreme Court also adopted an unexpected argument that could have an enormous impact on future energy development in Pennsylvania.

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SC Johnson Shows How to Do Wind Right, Despite Lack of Support from Home State

| Thursday December 19th, 2013 | 2 Comments

SC Johnson celebrates one year anniversary of wind turbinesConsumer surveys are beginning to show that products manufactured with wind power get high marks, and potentially more customers. That’s good news for startup brands, but you don’t have to be new on the market to reap good value out of wind power. Case in point is SC Johnson, which has been around since 1886 while growing iconic household brands including Windex, Glade, Pledge, Scrubbing Bubbles, Off!, and Raid — all now manufactured with wind power thanks to two 415-foot turbines at the company’s Waxdale plant.

SC Johnson has been putting a lot of eggs in the wind power basket. The company greets visitors to its home page with a top-of-the-page “NOW MADE WITH WIND!” proclamation, and it has just come out with a splashy announcement of the one-year anniversary of the operation of its two massive wind turbines.

All of this makes us wonder, why are legislators in SC Johnson’s home state of Wisconsin still trying to obstruct future wind development in the state?

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OriginOil Could Have An Algae Solution for Sustainable Aquaculture

| Monday December 16th, 2013 | 0 Comments

OriginOil launches sustainable aquaculture showcase.Energy and feed costs have been identified as two of the key issues facing the future growth of aquaculture – a technology which must grow if the world’s human population is going to increase without exhausting natural fisheries. That’s where companies like OriginOil come in. We’ve been following OriginOil’s energy-wise progress in the algae biofuel arena, and given the connection between algae and fish feed, it was only a matter of time before the company applied its technology to sustainable fish farming.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at OriginOil’s new showcase for aquaculture at the Salton Sea in California, which is due for a public launch on Wednesday, December 18.

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Honda Hops Aboard the Vehicle-to-Grid Train

| Monday December 9th, 2013 | 0 Comments

Honda joins UDel V2G projectThe electric vehicle-to-grid (V2G) movement is picking up steam. The latest example comes from Honda, which  announced that it is participating in a major V2G demonstration project spearheaded by the University of Delaware. If the project bears fruit, which it is likely to do, it will provide yet another reason for commercial fleets to transition out of petroleum products and into electric vehicles: it will give them an opportunity to make money.

We’ve already noted a Massachusetts Institute of Technology study showing that conversion from diesel to electric trucks could save fleet owners a substantial amount of money, once the potential for V2G earnings is factored in. Now let’s see what UDel and Honda are up to.

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With Eye on Asia Market, LEGO Plans Huge Carbon Emissions Reduction

| Monday December 2nd, 2013 | 1 Comment

LEGO pledges greenhouse gas reductionsLEGO Group is gazing into a future of strong sales growth worldwide, especially in Asia, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a consequent growth in its greenhouse gas emissions. The iconic toy company has just announced a new partnership with the World Wildlife Foundation Climate Savers initiative for businesses. The new agreement goes beyond LEGO’s in-house operations to embrace a comprehensive partnership all along its supply chain.

That’s an important development because according to LEGO, only about 10 percent of its greenhouse gas emissions are related directly to manufacturing products within the factory walls. The other 90 percent comes from the supply and distribution chains, as well as end-of-life impacts. With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the main goals of the plan.

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The Car of the Future Will Heal Itself

| Tuesday November 19th, 2013 | 1 Comment

biomimicry inspires self healing EV battery.One clear advantage of electric vehicles over conventional cars is the simplicity and longevity of the electric drive system. That’s a big plus for fleet managers in terms of maintenance, repair and replacement costs, and now a research team from Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has extended the savings by engineering a self-healing element into the EV battery itself.

Inspired by biomimicry, the team has come up with a new polymer (a form of plastic) that can be coated onto the electrode in a lithium ion battery. As with natural systems like the human body, which rely on self healing to survive, the flexible coating is designed to act autonomously and heal the cracks that develop on electrodes during the battery lifecycle.

A biomimicry tweak for EV batteries

In one of those happy accidents of science, the immediate motivator for the team’s self-healing battery project was the need to develop a long-lasting, flexible “electronic skin” for robots and prosthetic devices.

As it turned out, the polymer coating also tackles a huge problem in lithium ion (Li-ion) energy storage, which is the loss of capacity over time as the battery runs through charging and discharging cycles.

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Cleveland Browns Roll Out New Food Waste-to-Energy System

| Monday November 18th, 2013 | 3 Comments

Cleveland Browns will showcase food .waste to energy systemThe Cleveland Browns football franchise plans to showcase its food waste-to-energy system at a big home game against the Pittsburgh Steelers on November 24. The new system, called Grind2Energy, is the first of its kind at any NFL stadium. It reclaims food scraps for conversion into renewable methane gas, rather than sending it to a landfill where it would decompose and add methane (a potent greenhouse gas) to the atmosphere.

For those of you who follow clean energy news regularly, Grind2Energy isn’t new as in “new rocket science” new. It’s basically a highly efficient system for hauling slurry from on-site garbage grinders to off-site biogas digesters.

What’s really striking about the demonstration is that a pro football franchise would go out of its way to showcase something as humble and off-topic (off-topic to sports, that is) as sustainable food waste management. So, what’s up with that?

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Yet Another Way to Put Wastewater to Work

| Monday November 11th, 2013 | 1 Comment

new process recovers biogas from wastewaterThey’re going to have to find another name for wastewater pretty soon. This much maligned byproduct of household and industry has been quietly making a name for itself as a recoverable resource. One of the latest examples comes from South Africa, where gas and oil company, Sasol, has partnered with GE Power & Water to develop a new system for providing a high level of treatment for industrial wastewater that also recovers biogas for power generation.

The new system, called Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor Technology (AnMBR), is transferrable to other industries, so let’s take a look and see how it works.

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Fracking’s Red Queen Effect Means Even More Drilling

| Monday November 4th, 2013 | 2 Comments

Red Queen effect signals fracking bubble bust.Our friends over at Fuel Fix have chipped in with another warning that the fracking bubble is about to burst, but that won’t necessarily mean relief is in sight for communities beset by the negative impacts of fracking. A rapid decline in productivity from shale formations is leading to a rapid increase in the number of new wells as companies attempt to make up for the dropoff in revenue. Fuel Fix calls this the Red Queen effect, after the frenetic character in Alice in Wonderland, and it could lead to tens of thousands of new wells in South Texas alone over the next few years.

The full Red Queen Effect article, by Jennifer Hiller, is well worth a read. It focuses on the Eagle Ford shale formation in Texas, but its lessons can also be applied to the Marcellus Shale region in Appalachia and other shale formations throughout the U.S.

 The Red Queen Effect

For those of you new to the issue, fracking is short for hydrofracturing, an unconventional method of natural gas (and oil) drilling that involves pumping massive amounts of chemical-laden brine into shale formations.

Aside from the obvious environmental hazards, one bottom-line risk is the fact that the typical shale formation depletes far more rapidly than sites for conventional drilling.

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Navy Yard Demonstrates How Energy Storage is the Future

| Friday November 1st, 2013 | 0 Comments

Philadelphia Navy Yard showcases new energy storage system.You’ve probably been hearing a lot about energy storage systems lately, and here’s a chance to see how they work on a large scale. The Philadelphia Navy Yard has embarked on a smart microgrid demonstration project called the GridSTAR Smart Grid Experience Center, including an advanced battery provided by the company Solar Grid Storage.

Don’t let the “navy yard” part of the name fool you. The Philadelphia Navy Yard has has been designated a federal Energy Innovation Hub with the help of $122 million in Department of Energy funding.* After languishing for decades, it has been repurposed as a business center and showcase for green technology. The GridSTAR Smart Grid Experience Center was specifically designed as a resource to help accelerate smart grid adoption in the northeast region.

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How a Solar PPA Can Help Your Business Expand

| Monday October 28th, 2013 | 0 Comments

Wastewater plant gets new solar system.The City of Kerman, California has just achieved one of our favorite bottom line and sustainability twofers, by using land at its wastewater treatment plant to host a 500-kilowatt solar system. Aside from shaving about 40 percent off the plant’s electricity costs, the solar array also offsets an energy-intensive expansion and upgrade of the treatment process.

The solar system was built by Borrego Solar under a solar PPA (Power Purchase Agreement) with ConEdison Solutions of Valhalla, NY, which means that Kerman taxpayers paid no money up front to get the savings and the clean energy while expanding and improving operations at their treatment plant. That’s a nifty little demonstration of having your cake and eating it, too. The question is, how does it apply to the private sector?

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