This category is climate change in relation to sustainability and CSR and how these segments effect one another. This includes how climate change has started to cause a wide range of physical effects with serious implications for investors and businesses, and how the business sector discloses climate risks and manage them.

Trump Picks Climate Change Denier for EPA Head

According to both the Washington Post and the New York Times, presidential candidate Donald Trump made his pick on who will oversee the Environmental Protection Agency if he is elected. While environmentalists would likely sum up Myron Ebell as a poor choice, he fits right in with Trump’s position on climate change.

Norway’s Capital Aims to Cut Carbon Emissions in Half by 2020

If your company has a new transportation, energy or “smart cities” technology and you need a living laboratory to test it out, consider Norway’s capital. Oslo’s latest budget seeks a clean-energy future while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent by 2020.

Can Two Words Save the Planet?

The terms “global warming” and “climate change” describe two interrelated and similar — but scientifically different — phenomena. But one term is increasingly used as the other is in retreat. When did this happen, and more importantly why?

‘Too Little, Too Late’ from APP on Sustainability

Three years after launching a well-publicized sustainability campaign, Asia Pulp & Paper is building a $3 billion pulp mill without a sustainable wood supply, say five thought leaders from the NGO space note in this 3p op/ed.

Pitch Perfect: Fostering Local Talent Makes Clean Cookstoves More Popular

BioLite employs 40 tenacious local sales agents in emerging markets who can captivate a crowd with their personalized pitches. Thanks to these in-person demonstrations, clean cookstoves can become a desirable, affordable and life-enhancing solution for tens of thousands of homes in India and sub-Saharan Africa.

Greenpeace: Bayer and Syngenta Knew About Pesticide Harm to Bees, Did Nothing

According to internal research documents obtained by Greenpeace under the Freedom of Information Act, both Bayer and Syngenta knew well about the negative impacts of neonicotinoid insecticides. Yet they still chose to sell the products widely, and even actively argued against independent studies connecting them to bee population declines.