This category is climate change in relation to sustainability and CSR and how these segments effect one another. This includes how climate change has started to cause a wide range of physical effects with serious implications for investors and businesses, and how the business sector discloses climate risks and manage them.

Environmental Laws and Compliance in India Should Follow Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Humanist psychologist Abraham Maslow believed that people have an inborn desire to be self-actualized, to be all they can be. In order to achieve this ultimate goal and be productive, however, a number of more basic needs must be met first, such as the need for food, safety, love and self-esteem — known as Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Similarly, environmental protection and compliance in a country like India will be successfully implemented and monitored if the basic needs and demands of human life are met first.

COP 21: Putting the Pieces Together for Private-Sector Action

In the aftermath of COP21, private-sector action is key to reaching emissions reduction goals. The marketplace needs to feel confident that the technologies that help reduce carbon dioxide emissions, whether they are renewable energy or clean technology, are worthy of investment. Proven technologies such as solar and wind are fast emerging as attractive investment asset classes that provide investors with low technology risk and stable, higher returns over a period of 20 years or more. Now is the time for these technologies to take center stage in the financing world.

Scientists React to Paris Agreement

If there is one thing we should also be able to agree on, it is that we need a climate accord based in scientific reality.

Climate’s Impact on America’s Poor

A global climate agreement is crucial for low-income people in the United States, who are on the front lines of climate change impacts, like the poor in every nation.

Climate Health, Indigenous Land Rights Are Linked: COP21 Report

A semi-remote Brazilian tribe has turned high-tech in an effort to protect its tropical forest, which is being devastated by poachers. It’s the latest effort to safeguard indigenous lands, which hold more than a fifth of the worlds trees. That’s according to a report that was released at COP21 last week, calling for global action to ensure that the forests that are vital to offsetting carbon emissions aren’t cut down for commercial profit.

COP21: Grand Success or Major Disappointment?

Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org said, “This didn’t save the planet, but it may have saved the chance of saving the planet.” Climate crusader James Hansen, who was among the first to sound the alarm, was less pleased with the level of compromise, calling the outcome a “fraud.” So, how should we feel about the COP21 outcome? Is it enough?

COP21’s Legacy: A New Era

These climate talks differed substantially from the prior COPs because they gave audience to resilience, argues Joyce Coffee of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index.