This category is climate change in relation to sustainability and CSR and how these segments effect one another. This includes how climate change has started to cause a wide range of physical effects with serious implications for investors and businesses, and how the business sector discloses climate risks and manage them.

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More Utilities Are Shifting to Renewable Energy

“Renewables — including wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, waste heat and small-scale hydroelectric — accounted for a whopping 49 percent of new U.S. electric generating capacity in 2012, with new wind development outpacing even natural gas,” writes Jon Wellinghoff, partner at Stoel Rives LLP and former chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, in the report

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NASA: Groundwater Depletion Threatens Southwest Water Supplies

Groundwater depletion accounts for more than 75 percent of total freshwater loss across the Colorado River Basin, a “shocking” finding that compounds threats across seven Western states, according to a first-of-its-kind NASA study.

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New Jersey Turns to Distributed Resources to Enhance Energy Resilience

With memories of the devastation Superstorm Sandy caused still fresh, the Christie administration launched the N.J. Energy Resilience Bank. The first of its kind in the nation, ERB was seeded with an initial $200 million in Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery funds.

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White House Launches $10 Billion Rural Infrastructure Fund

A public-private partnership, the Rural Infrastructure Opportunity Fund offers private sector investors an opportunity to leverage and capitalize on federal resources and expertise for the benefit of rural communities across the U.S.

Houston

Houston’s One-Bin Recycling Program: Path to Zero Waste or Environmental Racism?

When you think of zero waste, you might picture towering compost heaps or overflowing recycling carts – but what about one bin for all your household waste, from carrot peels and chicken bones to junk mail and soda bottles? That’s the idea behind Houston’s “One Bin for All” program, which aims to boost the city’s dismal recycling rate of 19 percent, which falls 15 percent below the average national recycling figure. Public officials predict the initiative will help the city keep 75 percent of its trash from the landfill, but critics of the program, ranging from the Texas Campaign for the Environment to the NAACP, contend that it will actually prevent the city from achieving zero waste and smacks of environmental racism.

urban farming, urban agriculture

Entrepreneurs Transform Urban Farming with High-Tech Solutions

Surprisingly, high tech urban farms are popping up around the world in every imaginable space from old warehouses in the Netherlands, to semi conductor factories in Japan and even on the roofs of commercial buildings in Brooklyn.

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British Supermarket Powered By Food Waste

The British supermarket chain, Sainsbury’s announced that one of its stores will be powered by its food waste. All of the electricity used by the store in Cannock, England will come from what’s called anaerobic digestion, which turns food waste into bio-methane gas that is used to generate electricity.

President Barack Obama met with the Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience last week.

Obama: Climate Change Is a Threat to U.S. Infrastructure

More extreme droughts, floods and wildfires – these are just some of the impacts of climate change that won’t just occur in the distant future to our great-great grandchildren, but are happening now. To address the changing climate’s current effects on communities in the U.S., President Barack Obama announced a plan to strengthen national infrastructure and help cities, states and tribal communities better prepare for and recover from natural disasters.

Kroger

Kroger Cuts Energy Use By 35 Percent, Ramps Up Sustainability Efforts

The Kroger Co. reduced the energy use in its stores by 34.6 percent since 2000, saving more than 2.5 billion kilowatt hours (kWh). That is enough electricity to power every home in Charlotte, North Carolina for a year — or the equivalent of taking 362,000 cars off the road for a year.

A local man paddles past submerged cars on South Beach in Miami in 2009. Locals say the rising tides are only getting worse.

3p Weekend: 5 Cities Already Feeling the Effects of Climate Change

While some still view climate change as some distant or unidentifiable threat (and others simply argue its effects “won’t be so bad”), the impacts of rising tides and surging temperatures are already changing lives around the world.