This category is climate change in relation to sustainability and CSR and how these segments effect one another. This includes how climate change has started to cause a wide range of physical effects with serious implications for investors and businesses, and how the business sector discloses climate risks and manage them.

Digital Business is Good for the Climate: How Tech Can Cut Emissions, Save Natural Resources

To create a true shift in the fight against climate change, there’s a need for concrete actions which can drive results. Digital business and technologies can make a big impact. SAP estimates that IT could help cut greenhouse gases by 7.6 Gt and save a value of around $30 trillion in resources, including water, energy and metals by 2030. According to new research, in six major industries like utilities, agriculture and food production and transportation and logistics, digital technologies can help save 7.6 Gt carbon emissions by 2030.

Making the Case for Responsible Corporate Adaptation

Caring for Climate, a joint initiative from UNEP, UN Global Compact and UNFCCC, has issued a report that urges companies to view climate adaptation not only through the lens of risk management, but also as a moral imperative.

The Chicken in the Room at the Paris Climate Talks

Ambassadors the world over are convening in Paris to identify global climate change solutions. While we’re making progress on a new accord, will the elephant — or in this instance, the chicken, turkey and pig — in the room be ignored?

The Leaders at COP21: The Climate Vulnerable Forum

The Climate Vulnerable Forum is made up of 43 member-countries, including more than 20 who joined at the onset of COP21. They are the true heroes at COP21, pushing for a 1.5-degrees Celsius limit.

The Business Imperative for International Carbon Price Signals at COP21

While some countries quibble over the expenses and the responsibility, business leaders look to clean energy, energy efficiency and sustainability as the drivers of innovation and economic growth. By showing up in Paris to lobby for action, businesses send a message to global policy leaders that climate action doesn’t have to mean negative economic impacts.

Oxfam: Developing Countries at Risk of Being ‘Squeezed Out’ of Paris Negotiations

On Tuesday morning in Paris, Oxfam Australia’s executive director, Helen Szok, issued the following statement about the ongoing COP21 negotiations: “Developing countries are at risk of being squeezed out of critical negotiations as the pace of talks intensifies. The small delegations of the poorest countries are being stretched, and it is vital that ministers ensure their voices are heard on critical issues like climate funding as the deadline for the Paris deal looms.” TriplePundit sat down with Heather Coleman, who manages Oxfam America’s climate policy work, to find out more.

Building a Case for National Water Management: Let There Be Water

Israel’s arduous journey to water independence is a fascinating story full of gutsy characters, big dreamers and amazing accomplishments. But for today’s global challenges, it’s more than a good read, as author Seth Siegel explains in his book, “Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution to a Water-Starved World.”

A Change of Tides for Sustainability

Held yesterday at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the World Climate Summit and the subsequent award ceremony held by Sustainia offered a fascinating counterpoint to the official COP21 negotiations. The event offered one overarching insight: We are now hitting the change of tides in sustainability. But just as the amplitude of tides and their timing are a function of multiple factors — including the alignment of the Sun and Moon, deep ocean tide patterns and the shape of the coastline — four ultimately variables will co-determine how the current change of tides in sustainability will play out. They are discussed in the blog post.