This category is climate change in relation to sustainability and CSR and how these segments effect one another. This includes how climate change has started to cause a wide range of physical effects with serious implications for investors and businesses, and how the business sector discloses climate risks and manage them.


Can Higher Ed Solve the Climate Crisis?

At the opening ceremony of the AASHE conference, Dr. John Anderson announced the launch a new project to engage higher education in climate solutions.


The Closed Loop Fund Helps Cities Increase Recycling

The biggest barrier facing most cities when it comes to providing the level of innovation and infrastructure needed to reduce waste and increase recycling rates often boils down to one factor: Money—or specifically, the absence of it.


Antarctic Melting Prompts South Miami to Secede

The residents of South Miami, FL doesn’t plan to sit around and wait for the Antartic ice cap to melt – or for Forida’s capital to come up with a plan that will save their city from flooding. They’ve come up with a plan of their own, and so far, it’s generating plenty of attention.


Climate Change: Ready for a New Era of Extreme Weather?

“Our preparedness deficit is the result of years of inaction and under-investment at the federal, state and local levels,” says Collin O’Mara, NWF president and CEO. “It’s time for our elected officials to reinvest in our natural defenses and this report offers a blueprint for bipartisan, market-based solutions.”

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Baker Hughes Fights Breast Cancer With Pink Fracking Drill Bits

Paint it pink. Why not? The pink-ification of just about everything to raise breast cancer awareness may have run up against its limits with pink oil drill bits. In a world with pink AR-15s, pink trash bins, pink soup cans, and pink everything else now Baker Hughes, a leader in hydraulic fracturing equipment, is painting pink 1000 drill … Continued

Robert T. Fraley of Monsanto Co. delivers his address on agriculture's role in mitigating global challenges. Water for Food conference. WFF conference in Bellevue WA. October 21, 2014. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communication — at 2014 Water for Food Conference.

Five Data Tools Used to Improve Water and Food Security

As the world population soars toward 9 billion people, the demand for food is expected to more than double. Lack of water is a critical constraint to increasing food production, particularly as climate change makes water even scarcer. Big Data is helping to meet that challenge.


Intelligent Readers and the Climate Crisis

In succinct and accessible language, this short but powerful book pulls no punches: climate change is the most critical threat to the planet today, and also the most complicated global issue. And, “like any critical threat it requires an emergency response.”

Jeff Raikes, Co-Founder of the Raikes Foundation, gives the plenary address about harnessing data for the poorest farmer. Water for Food. WFF conference October 20, 2014. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communication

6 Ways Big Data Helps Improve Global Water and Food Security

Jeff Raikes, former CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and co-founder of the Raikes Foundation, said it’s not hyperbole to say that global society is experiencing a data revolution. But that the revolution has yet to reach agriculture.

Restoring wetlands (like these wetlands at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts) can protect coastal communities from floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters.

How Natural Infrastructure Can Boost Climate Change Resiliency

Are government officials doing enough to prepare their communities for natural disasters and extreme weather events – that are increasing in frequency and severity due to climate change? Not surprisingly, the answer is no, says a new report. However, investment in “natural infrastructure” can improve resiliency at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods of prevention.


EPA: Native American Tribes Hit Hard by Climate Change

Native American communities are feeling the brunt of climate change these days. An estimated 44 tribes have reported that they are running out of water. Others are dealing with the effects of flooding and fire mitigation. The EPA is stepping up its efforts too: This year it awarded more than $40 million to Southwest tribal communities to upgrade and protect their drought-impacted resources.