This category is about corporate social responsibility (CSR), a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company’s actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere.

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Policy Points: How Business Can Influence Paid Leave, Taxes and Climate Issues

By Zach Bernstein Voluntary corporate sustainability initiatives and social enterprises are essential but are not game-changers by themselves. In addition, we need laws and regulations that guide our economy toward sound, long-term decision-making, with full recognition of social and environmental externalities. As business leaders, we must support policy changes to help make the economy more … Continued

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Twitter Chat RECAP: Boehringer Ingelheim at #SkillsVolunteering

TriplePundit hosted a Twitter Chat at #SkillsVolunteering with Boehringer Ingelheim and Northeast Hartford Partnership at Community Solutions to discuss how skills-based volunteering programs benefit companies, employees and communities.

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Greenpeace: Brands (Still) Not Doing Enough to Protect Indonesian Forests

Last year’s horrendous Southeast Asian forest fires should have been a wake-up call to companies to ensure their supply chains were free of unsustainable palm oil, the primary cause of deforestation in Indonesia. Yet, Greenpeace finds that, out of 14 major U.S. brands, only one can trace its palm oil, and few have made any discernible action in light of last year’s tragedy.

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SPECIAL SERIES: From Farm to Factory: A 3 Part Series on Social Impacts in Apparel

Addressing Forced Labor in the Garment Industry

The first inklings of international labor standards were hammered out almost a century ago, with the optimism that human rights abuses could be managed through international consensus. Today, those concepts seem far less realistic, especially when it comes to the growing garment industry and the profitable cotton trade. But organizations, consumers and businesses are making strides at lessening the social impact of forced labor and child labor in the cotton supply chain.