This category is about corporate social responsibility (CSR), a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company’s actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere.

3p Interview from #SB14sd: PwC on Resilience and Total Impact Measurement

Resilience to climate change and resource constraints was a trending topic at the 2014 Sustainable Brands conference in San Diego. In one of the many discussions on the issue, PwC led a panel on ‘building good growth’ in a brand by using breakthrough techniques like natural capital management and total impact measurement. I sat down with panelists Clinton Moloney and Amy Longsworth of PwC after the discussion to find out more.

Procter & Gamble Doubles Down on Sustainability

There are some big changes afoot at consumer products giant Proctor & Gamble (P&G), though with little in the way of comments from the company, it’s anybody’s guess what’s behind it.

SPECIAL SERIES: Sustainable Seafood

Greenpeace Reviews Major Food Retailers for Sustainable Seafood Purchasing

Greenpeace just issued the eighth edition of its report entitled Carting Away the Oceans. The wide-ranging report covers everything from human-rights abuses in the industry, to GMO salmon, to protecting America’s fish basket in the Bering Sea, where roughly one-half of all seafood landed in the U.S. comes from. We sat down with the report’s author for a look inside.

SPECIAL SERIES: Sustainable Seafood

7 Things You Need to Know About the Sustainable Seafood Movement

You may have noticed things getting a little fishy here at Triple Pundit over the past few months, as we dive into the environmental and social impact of the seafood industry in an in-depth series. In case you’re pressed for time (it is Friday after all), this list will give you the need-to-know facts and trends in the burgeoning sustainable seafood movement. Give it a read, and impress your friends at the oyster bar happy hour after work.

SPECIAL SERIES: Building Shared Value

Can Shared Value Successfully Connect ‘Davos Men’ with the ‘Square People’?

Earlier this month Thomas Friedman wrote on the New York Times about two very different groups trying to shape the economic environment worldwide. The first was “Davos men”–the “transnational, cosmopolitan elite drawn from high-tech, finance, multinationals, academics and NGOs,” who regularly attend the Davos World Economic Forum. The second group was the “square people”–according to Friedman, it includes mostly young people, who are aspiring to a higher standard of living and more liberty, seeking either reform or revolution in their country (depending on their existing government) and “demanding a new social contract.”