This category is about corporate social responsibility (CSR), a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company’s actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere.

Nespresso, coffee pods, recycling, waste diversion, Leon Kaye, Nestle, UPS

Nespresso Expands U.S. Recycling Program, But Is It Enough?

Nespresso says its recycling program — which it plans to expand to the contiguous 48 states of the U.S. — mitigates the environmental impact of single-use coffee pods. But not everyone is buying into the company’s communications plans.

General Mills, artificial colors, GMOs, Leon Kaye, transparency, supply chain, Trix Cereal

Trix Cereals Ditch Artificial Colors, But Consumers Don’t Care

Earlier this week, General Mills’ social media team reminded the public about the new Trix cereal in a cute video posted on the company’s Facebook page. While the bunny scored some points, the post was overwhelmingly panned by commenters.

japan-217878_1280

4 Key Steps to Increase the Strategic Value of Your CSR Programs

Corporations across the board are struggling to figure out how exactly to be more strategic in their giving. However, working with brands who are able to do so successfully, we have gained a wealth of insight and best practices. The following steps will help you as your corporation looks to get more strategic in your philanthropic giving.

Ben & Jerry's voiced its support for Oregon's failed mandatory GMO labeling legislation by erecting this billboard in Portland in 2014. While the USDA and other agencies maintain that GMOs are safe, the debate about whether or not such ingredients should be labeled rages on -- and it's a case study for transparency.

SPECIAL SERIES: From Farm to Factory: A 3 Part Series on Social Impacts in Apparel

Transparency and the Key to Consumer Trust

More than 100 years ago, the first fledgling calls for business transparency were heard. At that time, it was in the grueling textile mills where children worked intolerable schedules in place of school. Today, transparency figures into every business sector. Businesses know that consumers care not just about what they buy, but also the values the company puts to work. And they are willing to ask for accountability.

7222469296_3397579ce2_z

I’m Over Doing Good

Patsy Doerr, global head of corporate responsibility and inclusion for Thomson Reuters, is over doing good. She explains why in this op/ed.

Menus of Change

Food 2.0: More Plants, Less Meat

While humane, environmental and hunger-relief organizations are seeking ways to feed the ballooning population that is expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, health organizations are scrambling to curb obesity and stymie heart disease. An abundance of research supports the notion that one of the easiest and most powerful interventions to address all of these challenges is a plant-based diet.

4834967150_4ba17de1ca_z

The Extreme Sport of Entrepreneurship

Allison Maslan, a serial entrepreneur and trapeze practitioner, shares pointed lessons her sporting passion taught her about life in business.

Ikea

Ikea Releases New Sustainability-Focused Products

Ikea is expanding its product line into surprising new directions. In the coming months, the furniture giant will release a tabletop hydroponic garden and “the iPad of bikes.”

drops-of-water-578897_1280

Partnerships and Policy: Shaping the Future of Water Together

For decades, water scarcity was fiercely debated; today, we recognize it as an unfortunate and permanent reality. Advancing policy, technology and collaboration are the only ways to build a more sustainable and secure water future.

An electronics factory in

Are Your Electronics Socially Responsible?

As organizations work to meet sustainability standards across their entire supply chain, they’re taking a hard look at the socioeconomic impacts of the electronics that form the backbone of their business. And they’re holding their vendors to ever-higher expectations.

6510934443_8bd2942b79_z

The Future of Employee Benefits: Employee Giving Programs

Research suggests the presence of corporate philanthropy programs have the potential to increase revenue by up to 20 percent, reduce staff turnover by up to 50 percent, and can even have an effect on the overall mood and health of employees.