This category is about corporate social responsibility (CSR), a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company’s actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere.


3 Mind-Blowing CSR Strategies from SXSW Eco

Corporate responsibility programs are on autopilot. Donate to the local nonprofit. Fill up backpacks for school kids. Assemble bicycles for Christmas gifts. Those are good deeds but … they’re about as exciting as the 2-year-old PB&J sandwich you found under the seat of your car. Sometimes, your community engagement program needs a dose of the novel, exciting and adventurous. Here are some ideas.


How Corporate Climate Change Talk Differs Online, in D.C.

It’s in vogue these days for a corporation to say it stands behind climate change action. It’s another thing however, say the authors of the new website, InfluenceMap, to find one that really does support steps that offer change. The website dug deep when it looked at 100 global corporations and their public (and not so public) stance on climate change. The results were quite revealing.

During Climate Week NYC 2014, thousands took to the streets to demand climate action. Now, it seems companies are standing up to take notice.

3p Weekend: 60+ Companies Going All-In on Climate

Over the past few months, we’ve seen dozens companies roll out bold commitments to tackle climate change. And, as the historic COP21 climate talks in Paris approach, we’re likely to see a whole lot more. But this week we’re tipping our hats to the climate trailblazers: the leaders of the pack who aren’t waiting for government to mandate climate action, but are making moves now.

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Sealed Air Proves a Packaging Company Can Make An Impact

“I believe we no longer sell packaging,” said Jerome A. Peribere, president and CEO of Sealed Air, “we sell increased shelf life.” But a longer shelf life on perishable food items isn’t the only way this packaging company is helping others in its supply chain reduce waste.


Apparel Worker Well-Being Gets a Fresh Look

“Durability and quality have to be the value proposition for our clothing, instead of the thrill of buying the next new thing,” Daniel Lee, executive director of the Levi Strauss Foundation, said at SXSW Eco last week.


Jet Blue Greens Up JFK Airport with Organic Potato Farm

Call it JFK Airport’s farm-to-tray program. With any luck and a whole lot of tender loving care, Jet Blue passengers will be able to sample home-grown potatoes during their in-flight dinners and snacks — straight from the airport’s Terminal 5. It’s part of Jet Blue’s effort to spruce up the environment at the JFK, and give a little back to Mother Nature and local communities.


Why Won’t the Gates Foundation Divest?

Divestment is cool. Bill Gates, apparently, is not, and his foundation is behind the times by continuing to invest in risky fossil fuels.

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From Boomers to Millennials: How to Design an Engaging Employee Giving Program

Gone are the days of the top-down fundraising program using the same old tactics and tools. As participation in conventional company-led giving efforts declines, Benevity is aiming to help companies improve their giving programs with five practices that drive measurable engagement. When applied the right way, you may just find yourself transforming a stagnant program into a pillar of your employee engagement strategy.


Clorox Goes Sustainable?

Clorox, a company many wouldn’t initially associate with sustainability, is making moves to reduce its environmental impact by cutting waste and resource use.


Volkswagen Injury and Death Stats Significantly Underreported, Say Analysts

Volkswagen is under the microscope again, this time because analysts say the yearly accident stats it gives to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration are underreported. Their proof? Other automakers’ are known to be guilty of underreporting, and VW’s reported numbers are nine times below those of its competitors. It’s a novel way of finding discrepancies, for sure.