This category is about corporate social responsibility (CSR), a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company’s actions and encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere.

FedEx Tackles Emissions: On the Ground and in the Air

Climate change is a very real threat, so it’s great when a global shipping company like FedEx does something to reduce its impact. Through programs to cut emissions from air and ground deliveries — as well as reduce indirect emissions tied to energy consumption — FedEx is shrinking its footprint one order at a time.

Mining: Inclusive Investment for a New Triple Bottom Line

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) in mineral extraction itself is relatively new – even newer is the risk mitigation that drives institutional investment decisions, particularly among larger European banks, insurers and pension funds. Yet despite its dire need, systematic, proactive financial engagement remains elusive – even as successful examples abound worldwide.

California Drought Threatens Los Angeles Denim Industry

About 80 percent of California’s water sustains agriculture, but Sacramento is putting the onus on the state’s businesses and residents to find even more ways to conserve this precious resource. One sector scrambling to find even more ways to conserve water is Los Angeles’ denim industry.

Philip Morris Sues Uruguay Over Anti-Smoking Campaign

One can surmise the many things tobacco companies have in common with fast food corporations, including the fact they must expand their business abroad while sales stagnate on both sides of the Atlantic. The result is that the World Health Organization estimates that 70 percent of the 8.4 million deaths that will be attributed tobacco use in 2020 will occur in developing countries. One country that has long run an aggressive anti-smoking campaign is Uruguay, but its laws are under threat by a lawsuit filed by Philip Morris International.

3 Easy Steps to Bust Computer Clutter

Employees waste an estimated 15 to 25 percent of their time at work trying to locate information they need to do their job — that equates to roughly six weeks of work. In our ever-evolving economy productivity is key, and wasting time trying to sort through computer clutter can push deadlines, create duplicate work and ultimately cost an employer money.

3p Weekend: 5 Cities and States That Are Ending Homelessness

Although study after study has shown that it costs states and cities more money to leave homeless people on the street than it does to give them a place to stay, few localities have done anything with this data. But a select few are leading the charge and showing that it is indeed possible to end homelessness.

Recycling Technology Keeps Sustainable Fashion in the Loop

Swedish retail giant H&M is teaming up with Puma to trial an innovative new textile-to textile recycling technology. Although the technology is still in test mode, it is expected to be ready for commercial use in a couple of years, the companies said.

How to Pilot an International Corporate Volunteering Program

While existing international corporate volunteering (ICV) programs, like Pfizer’s Global Health Fellows Program, IBM’s Corporate Service Corps, Intel’s Education Service Corp, SAP’s Social Sabbatical and Microsoft’s MySkills4Afrika Program are the most frequently cited, your company doesn’t need something as far-reaching or broad, at least to start with. Here are seven tips to get a skills-based volunteering program started at your company.

Supply Chain Sustainability Needs a Fresh Viewpoint

Recent history has presented many examples of reputed organizations, such as Apple, Walmart, Target, Primark and Tesco, facing the ire of customers, investors and governments due to unwarranted incidents in their supply chains. It is increasingly becoming clear that unsustainable supply chains can have negative reputational as well as financial implications. As a result, sustainability of supply chains is getting renewed attention from organizations worldwide. Unfortunately, the approach for achieving sustainable supply chains has become stereotyped, and most organizations end up only meeting compliance.

The STEM Jobs Gap and Minority Youth Engagement

#YesWeCode, led by Van Jones, advocates for STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) inclusion and wider access to computer science education for minority students across the country.

SPECIAL SERIES: Sustainably Attired

Cradle-to-Cradle Tackles the Fashion Industry

Launched in 2014, Fashion Positive aims to retool the entire global fashion supply chain and help create more sustainable materials, processes and products. Already, the initiative is collaborating with brands such as Stella McCartney, G-Star RAW, Bionic Yarn, Loomstate and Belk department stores. While most of the sustainability conversation in the fashion industry focuses on going to zero – zero waste, zero water, zero energy, zero toxins – Fashion Positive wants to create more good instead of just less bad.

The Unsustainability of Extended Payment Terms

A growing number of companies are engaging in a race to the bottom, extending their supplier payment terms to as long as a six-month wait. And yet these same companies call themselves responsible citizens.

Mining Companies Discover the Truth About CSR: It Pays

Some would say that the concept of corporate social responsibility in the extractive industry is an oxymoron: True CSR can’t be fulfilled in an industry that promotes a carbon-based production system and product. But increasingly, CSR is fulfilling a role in communities that support mining operations. It’s building community infrastructure, sending impoverished residents to school and fulfilling dreams. Is it all greenwashing, or a step toward a more responsible, community-oriented industry? And should it be the end-all for a world that is increasingly being impacted by our carbon footprint?

Finding the Value in Sustainable and Inclusive Business Activities

How are sustainable business practices initiated and valuated? Though materiality assessments continue to advance in sophistication, in order to initiate sustainable or inclusive business projects, managers must still demonstrate the business case, usually in the form of Profit = Revenue – Cost.