This category is about the relation between business economies and sustainability and CSR. Company economies have great impact on how much effort they put into their CSR strategy and incorporating green strategies can have an effect on company growth. Topics include: Conscious Capitalism, Social Enterprise, B-Corps, Circular Economy, Sharing Economy

Did Airbnb Win or Lose On Prop F?

Airbnb successfully lobbied to defeat a ballot initiative that sought to limit house-sharing in San Francisco. But did the company really win?

3 Reasons Business Leaders Should Care About Upward Mobility

Today, rather than being the world’s poster child for a fair and equitable economy, the U.S. — home of the American Dream — is one of the least equitable among Western nations. But why should business leaders care about the lack of upward mobility in America? As a successful businessman, Jeff Greene, founder of the Greene Institute, gives three reasons why.

How Generation Z Will Make CSR A Business Norm

Generation Z is the first generation born in the 21st century, with ages ranging from 2 to 19. They represent about 25 percent of the U.S. population, and have approximately $44 billion in annual buying power. If businesses and governments thought they had to change to adapt to millennials, then they should appreciate this: Gen Z is already working to change their world.

How to Make Scope-3 Carbon Accounting Less Scary

Truth be told, conducting a full inventory of Scope 3 (also referred to as value-chain emissions) is a significant task. But it’s not as scary as you may think, says Sustrana CEO Jennifer Anderson. She sat down with Scope-3 accounting expert Don Bain to learn more.

How Can Public-Private Partnerships Achieve Sustainable Change?

We’ve just witnessed the member countries of the U.N. agree to 17 Global Goals that will, all going well, transform our world by 2030. No one individual, organization or government is able to tackle the SDGs. But effective partnerships can.

The Federal Reserve’s Role in Saving the Planet

The Federal Reserve has a very clear mission that includes three basic objectives: maximize employment, keep prices stable and keep interest rates reasonable. The Federal Reserve is also responsible for “containing systemic risk that may arise in financial markets.” Given the objectives mentioned, take a moment to strategize on how you might convince the Federal Reserve to take a more active role in addressing climate change.

SPECIAL SERIES: The Future of Fair Trade

3 Things to Know for Fair Trade Month

Fair Trade Month is a time to spread the word about who and where our products come from. This means putting the spotlight on challenges like child labor in cocoa and slavery in seafood, and also celebrating the farms, factories, brands and retailers that are doing things differently. As we dive into the second half of October, there are three important things to know about Fair Trade Month.

How Corporate Climate Change Talk Differs Online, in D.C.

It’s in vogue these days for a corporation to say it stands behind climate change action. It’s another thing however, say the authors of the new website, InfluenceMap, to find one that really does support steps that offer change. The website dug deep when it looked at 100 global corporations and their public (and not so public) stance on climate change. The results were quite revealing.

Freelancing Rules? It’s 54 Million Strong

“People are increasingly building flexible careers on their own terms, based on their passions, desired lifestyle and access to a much broader pool of opportunities than ever before in history,” said Stephane Kasriel, CEO of Upwork.

In Defense of Recycling and Common Sense

In his New York Times opinion piece from Oct. 3, John Tierney marginalizes the environmental benefits of recycling and waste diversion when he posits that recycling a great number of manufactured and organic materials has no economic rationale. As leaders of the sixth largest city in the U.S. and the nation’s largest university, respectively, we not only find Mr. Tierney’s assertions faulty, but we also contend that they are based on an obsolete economic model.