San Francisco and Oakland Sue Fossil Fuel Companies Over Sea Level Rise

San Francisco and Oakland are among the growing number of public entities that are looking ahead and realizing the mounting tab they will have to pay for climate change mitigation. This week they took action on that with two suits that name fossil fuel companies as the responsible parties for infrastructure damage caused by global warming and sea level rise.

Six Charts to Explain U.S. State Greenhouse Gas Emissions

As major global greenhouse gas emitters, U.S. states have the economic heft and legislative authority to move the United States toward much lower emissions and cleaner energy. While many have done so in the last decade, some remain stuck in the high-emitting past. The following six charts show how emissions from U.S. states compare, how they are changing and what could come next. These are based on the latest greenhouse gas emissions data World Resources Institute compiled for all 50 states.

Businesses and Local Governments Aggressively Leading on Climate Action

According to a report jointly issued by The Climate Group and the New Climate Institute, climate action is making encouraging progress across the U.S., with or without the federal government. States, cities and the private sector are driving these changes despite the White House’s decision to exit the Paris Agreement.

Coal-Fired Power Plants Cost U.S. Consumers $10B a Year

According to Carbon Tracker, the closing of unprofitable coal-fired power plants across the U.S. could save consumers as much as $10 billion a year by 2021 and increase the country’s competitiveness.

Corporations Causing Sea Level Rise — New Proof

A new study backed by the Union of Concerned Scientists finds that about 30 percent of the world’s sea level rise can be directly attributed to emissions from fossil fuel producers. And they name names too.

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We Are Still In: How Businesses Reshape Political Advocacy in Washington

There’s a reason why it makes perfect sense that business leaders are leading the call on some the country’s most decisive initiatives. According to Bob Keefe, executive director of Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2), who helped launch the We Are Still In initiative, there’s a strong business case for supporting the Paris Accord, and for putting it in the framework that business people – including President Trump – can understand.

A Climate Change Solution All Around Us: Net Zero Carbon Buildings

The signing of the Paris Agreement in December 2015 was rightly hailed as an historic moment in the fight against climate change. A key part of making that promise a reality, is all around us – in the floors, walls and rooftops that protect our way of life.