FDA Says Yes to GMO Salmon Without Labeling

In a sign of what the future of food will entail, and what is a huge setback for anti-GMO activists, the FDA decided yesterday that genetically modified salmon is as safe to eat, and is just as nutritious, as any wild or farmed Atlantic salmon.

Taco Bell Commits to Sourcing Cage-Free Eggs By Next Year

Taco Bell announced this week that 100 percent of its 6,000 U.S. restaurants will serve only cage-free eggs by December 2016. That would make the company the first fast food chain to makes its eggs completely cage-free, and it will transition to cage-free in just a 12 month time frame. Its eggs will be verified as “American Humane Certified” by the American Humane Association.

American Financial Services Giant Attacked for Role in Brazilian Land Grab

According to Grain, a small NGO that supports small farmers and social equality movements, the financial services giant TIAA-CREF has had a central role in a scheme that has acquired vast amounts of farmland across Brazil—even though the country has strict laws covering foreign investments in farmland.

SPECIAL SERIES: The Problem with Food Waste

Solutions to Grocery Store Food Waste

Forty percent of food goes uneaten in the U.S., a National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) report found. While some of it is thrown away by consumers, some of it is also thrown out by retailers. In-store food losses totaled about 43 billion pounds in 2008, equal to 10 percent of the nation’s total food supply at the retail level.

FDA Takes Bolder Action on Fresh Produce Inspection

The FDA, the federal government agency tasked with food inspection but in recent years has avoided much of it thanks to politics, is taking more aggressive action in order to prevent foodborne illnesses in fresh produce that have turned many a benign meal into a public health threat.

General Mills and Annie’s: One Year In

It’s been one year since General Mills purchased the beloved organic mac and cheese maker. We check in to see how acquisition is going and what it means for lovers of the Berkeley, Calif kid’s food maker.

The Slow Loss of Foods We Love

Journalist, educator and foodie Simran Sethi spent her life obsessed with food. So, she was surprised to learn that agrobiodiversity loss put many of her favorites at risk. She set out to learn more and chronicled her findings in her new book, “Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love,” excerpted here.

Ecuador Braces for El Niño

The El Niño phenomenon of 2015-2016 is expected to be rival that of 1997-1998, which caused losses equal to 14.5 percent of Ecaudor’s GDP. If predictions are correct, the months ahead could cause debilitating floods, outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses, and catastrophic crop and infrastructure damage. How is the country preparing?

Fetzer Vineyards Becomes Largest Winery To Go Net Positive

Fetzer has been pioneering earth-friendly winemaking long before it was a buzzword. But Fetzer is on a mission to become better than sustainable: The company set the ambitious goal to become completely net positive by 2030.

The Human Rights Abuses Packed Into Canned Tuna

That little can of tuna many people love to eat is packed with more than just protein. It likely is linked to human rights abuses. Take Thai Union, the largest canned tuna producer on the planet, which supplies brands and retailers around the world. Despite media attention, the company has failed to do anything about human rights abuses in its tuna supply chain, according to a recent Greenpeace report.

Alameda Kitchen: A New Recipe for Tackling Hunger and Food Waste

Last month, the USDA announced a goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030. But how are we going to get there? One thing is for sure: We can’t keep doing the same thing and expect different results. The traditional models of food recovery and food assistance aren’t solving the problems. Here’s what Food Shift is doing differently and why it’s important in the effort to reduce wasted food and hunger.

Corporate Philanthropy is More Than Writing Checks

The corporate philanthropy of tomorrow will focus on issues material to the business and seek collaborative partnerships to create impact that can stand the test of time. “Kombit: The Cooperative,” a film by Found Object, documents how one company, in partnership with a local nonprofit, sought to test whether this type of engagement could truly be successful in practice.