mcdonalds logo

Is There a Sustainable Big Mac in Your Future?

Giant corporations like McDonald’s and Walmart cast a long shadow across the planet with the enormous amount of resources that they utilize, process, consume and sell. McDonald’s flips and bags 70 million hamburgers every day and is responsible for a full 2 percent of the world’s beef consumption. So when you consider the impact that beef production has on the environment, particularly with regard to climate change, a move by the fast food giant to sustainable beef could be a really big deal.

In-N-Out

If In-N-Out Can Pay (a Lot) More Than Minimum Wage, Why Can’t McDonald’s?

In-N-Out Burger, a fast food chain in California and the Southwest, starts its employees off at a wage of $10.50 an hour. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez makes a good point. If In-N-Out Burger can do it–remain profitable and still provide what has arguably been deemed a superior product–why can’t McDonald’s?

Long John Silvers

Long John Silver’s Hoists Jolly Roger for Sustainable Seafood

A new set of ads from Long John Silver’s raise the Jolly Roger in honor of sustainable food and more environmentally sound eating, citing the lower methane and greenhouse gas footprint of fish compared to livestock, and real free-range food from “the final frontier,” otherwise known as the North Pacific.

Vancouver Pride Parade attendees express their displeasure with Russia's record on gay rights.

Why Olympic Sponsors Must Take a Stand Against Russian LGBT Discrimination

Despite understandable excitement and anticipation, the 2014 Sochi Winter Games have been somewhat tainted by Russia’s passage last summer of anti-gay legislation.

With citizen demonstrations, calls for product boycotts and hashtag hijacking, sponsors are put in the position to defend rather than celebrate their association with the Olympic Games. But a select few companies have used the controversy as an opportunity to take a stance on human rights.

Chris Wille

11 Steps to Sustainable Agriculture in the Anthropocene Age

We have now entered the age of the Anthropocene, where humans dominate the earth. Our collective activities are causing great changes even to the climate. Agriculture is both the most common expression of this dominance and the human activity most impacted by the changes. If agriculture is to survive in the Anthropocene, it must develop new sustainability characteristics.

McDonald's_BigMac_Kici

McResource Site Advises Employees to Skip the Burgers and Fries

McDonald’s pulled its employee website last week after it came to the realization that it was actually advising its employees that it was unhealthy to buy its Big Macs. Calling a hamburger, fries and large drink “unhealthy” may have seemed OK in comparison to a sub and salad, but it didn’t go down well with McDonald’s administration.

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SAP and the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation Partner to Support Rural Workers

In an effort to bring technology to rural communities in Colombia, SAP announced last week that it has joined forces with the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC) and the Manuel Mejía Foundation to improve the quality of life for Colombian farmers by providing them with the technology and training they need to develop more sustainable business practices.

desert sun

BSR’s Bold Climate Change Commitment

BSR’s President Aron Cramer made a big commitment at this week’s conference in San Francisco. He and the BSR team are doubling down on 2 degrees Celsius, drawing a line in the sand and committing to use the power of their network to avoid breaching a global temperature rise above it. Two degrees is, of … Continued

Vegetables

Can We Feed 9.6 Billion by 2050?

Hunger is the most pressing issue we face, especially considering one out of every eight people in the world today suffers from chronic undernourishment caused by food scarcity. And many believe this number is likely to increase as rapid population growth taxes limitations on food, water and farmland regionally—and growing development and affluence change our diets.