Wallet Hub

The Most and Least Eco-Friendly States of 2015

As the celebration of Earth Month wraps ups, WalletHub’s recently-released study citing America’s most and least eco-friendly states takes the temperature of how we’re progressing toward a more environmentally healthy nation. Click through to see how your state stacks up.

Armenian genocide protest

Turkey Continues to Deny Armenian Genocide

From 1915 until 1923, about 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. Forced out of their homes and ancient land, they were made to walk death marches to the Syrian desert. Most died along the way. Even 100 years later, the Turkish government continues to deny that what happened was genocide.

Sen. Gaylord Nelson, often called the "father of Earth Day," chats with children in a Wisconsin marshland.

3p Weekend: The History of Earth Day — In Less Than 5 Minutes

Even as the cynic within us gripes about yet another Earth Day, it’s important to remember how the tradition began. Ready for a five-minute history lesson? Grab a fresh cup of coffee, and brush up on the history of Earth Day.

green shoot growing from a stack of coins

Embracing a New Definition for Social Investing

Definitions — we are so over them in the social investing sector. Yet once in a while a new definition comes along, and we really need to pay attention. That’s the case with the definition for social investing proposed by a new report, After the Gold Rush, from the Alternative Commission on Social Investment (ACSI). This report highlights telling developments in the practice of social investing and yields a new, clarifying meaning for the term.

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The Path to Mandated Municipal Composting

Municipal-scale food waste composting is available in only a handful of cities. So, why isn’t composting mandatory in cities and towns? At least four barriers need to be overcome.

U.S. power plants withdrew as much water as farms did and four times as much water as all Americans did in 2005, according to a report from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

California’s Hidden Water Consumer: Power Plants

As California suffers through its fourth year of record drought and Gov. Jerry Brown imposes mandatory water restrictions for the first time in the Golden State’s history, the debate rages on over who consumes the most water and who should be responsible for cutting back: farmers, residents or the beef industry? But there’s another major consumer of water in California and the United States: power plants.

Pioneering municipalities can use traditional financial tools to preserve natural assets.

Moving Natural Assets from the Drawing Board to the Board Room

Making an environmental case for preserving natural assets is straightforward, but explaining their value within financial and management strategies takes real innovation. A handful of pioneering municipalities are testing new approaches to integrate natural assets such as rivers, forests and foreshores into the core of urban management.

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Research Group Blames Politics for Tax Filing Problems

Tax filing is a headache, and that’s why some 80 million Americans invest in professional tax preparation. But it doesn’t have to be that way, points out the nonpartisan organization Maplight. The research group did some digging and found that there are big names and big money standing in the way of a bill to simplify the tax filing system. The pockets are deep: to the tune of $35 million. And several top politicians own stock in the companies most fiercely opposed to tax filing reform.

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Canada’s Green Energy: The Push for a New East-West Grid

Geography and economic benefits have dominated Canada’s power grid for years. Now, researchers are calling for a redesign that would allow Canada to upgrade its ailing power structure and improve its green energy. The results of this 20-year endeavor could make Canada a powerhouse in the energy sector. And it could benefit the U.S. as well.

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Rush escorts the suspected high seas drift net fishing vessel Da Cheng in the North Pacific Ocean on August 14, 2012.

Some Question New U.S. Plan to Combat Illegal Fishing

“[The government] wants to prevent illegal, unregulated [and] unreported fishing — they have an acronym for it, and when the government gets acronyms for things, watch out! Here it comes,” trade lawyer Robert Becerra said at 2015 Seafood Expo North America. He’s not the only one who’s wondering how the government plans to enforce its new regulations to curb IUU fishing.

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Policy Points: How Tax Inversions Hurt Smaller Businesses

Unfortunately, this Tax Day, some companies will shoulder a smaller tax burden than others — a few will have none at all. It makes absolutely zero sense. And it’s all legal. One way companies can get their bill down to zero is through the process of a tax inversion. Here, a U.S. company buys a foreign competitor, then reincorporates the new company in the foreign country, where tax burdens are lower. This sleight of hand can have very real consequences for businesses.

rural wind farm

Report: Climate Change Poses High Risk for Low-Income Rural Communities

If you live on a fixed income, fluctuations in energy prices can have a dizzying impact. As climate justice advocate Gerald Durley put it during a recent conference call hosted by the Natural Resources Defense Council: “When unprecedented weather disasters devastate the poorest neighborhoods in places like New Orleans, New Jersey and New York, [climate change] is a civil rights issue.”

Philip Morris, smoking, tobacco, smoking bans, tobacco, Uruguay, Gates Foundation, International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes, ICSID, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Leon Kaye

Philip Morris Sues Uruguay Over Anti-Smoking Campaign

One can surmise the many things tobacco companies have in common with fast food corporations, including the fact they must expand their business abroad while sales stagnate on both sides of the Atlantic. The result is that the World Health Organization estimates that 70 percent of the 8.4 million deaths that will be attributed tobacco use in 2020 will occur in developing countries. One country that has long run an aggressive anti-smoking campaign is Uruguay, but its laws are under threat by a lawsuit filed by Philip Morris International.