A catch all category for government, politics and initiatives to influence either.

Mr. Trump Goes to Hamburg — and Ditches International Collaboration

President Donald Trump did make it to Hamburg this week, but relatively little was accomplished at this G20. Nineteen world leaders and one president’s daughter pushed for initiatives to help the planet and the world’s poorest citizens while America’s top man struck out on his own

United States Drops to Second Tier On Social Progress

This year’s Social Progress Index tells us a lot about the state of society these days — including the fact that a nation, touted often for its standard of living, isn’t at the top of the scale when it comes to social benefits and opportunities.

Policy Points: Regulation Reform — Bad Solutions for the Wrong Problem

Small businesses do not resent good regulations. American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) polling has found that 86 percent believe that regulations are necessary and 93 percent believe their business can live with fair and manageable regulations. The problem is small businesses lack the resources to comply with complicated legislation.

EPA Administrator Met Privately with Dow Chemical CEO Before Reversing Pesticide Ban

The EPA scored much criticism when it reversed a ban on the pesticide chlorpyrifos in March. Even low exposure to chlorpyrifos has been shown to cause developmental delays in children. Now it turns out EPA head Scott Pruitt met with the CEO of Dow Chemical, a manufacturer of the pesticide, a few weeks before the policy reversal.

Putting a Price Tag on the Great Barrier Reef

What’s the value of the Great Barrier Reef? Economists were recently tapped to figure that out. While it’s huge, some may say the study doesn’t take in its most important asset: The health and sustainability of our oceans and our atmosphere.

Missouri Third U.S. State to Sue Opioid Manufacturers

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley filed a lawsuit last week accusing opioid companies of fraud, and now three states are fighting back against pharmaceutical manufacturers in order to hold them accountable for the ongoing U.S. prescription drug epidemic.

Saving Brazil’s Amazon: A Job for Tiny Norway

It’s been a bad, bad month for Brazil’s President Michel Temer. First he is called on the carpet by Brazil’s supermodel, Gisele Bündchen, for efforts to open up more of the Amazon to deforestation. Then he’s told that he’s at risk of losing a $1.1 billion payment from Norway for the same concern. And if that’s not bad enough, the US is rejecting Brazil’s beef imports because of alleged bribes in the supply chain. What’s a president to do?

Flint Crisis and Environmental Health Liability

Earlier this month, Michigan’s Attorney General Bill Schuette’s office charged five high-ranking Department of Health officials with voluntary manslaughter for the deaths of 12 Flint residents who contracted Legionnaires’s from the polluted water. These rulings could set new precedent for culpability.

Rick Perry Plays the Fukushima Card

Secretary of Energy Rick Perry played the Fukushima card in explaining why the Trump Administration insists it is critical to revive the controversial Yucca Mountain site to store over 70,000 tons of nuclear power waste.

Major Tech Companies, NGOs Stand Up for Net Neutrality

Net neutrality advocates are gearing up for a battle on July 12 that may well be a global megaphone. Amazon, Vimeo, Netflicks and a host of nonprofit organizations have promised to lend their websites and their voices to tell the FCC that net neutrality must stay in place.

Healthcare Nightmares Flood Crowdfunding Sites, No End in Sight

Crowdfunding increasingly has become a way to raise funds for rising health care costs. The problem, however, is that the occasional success story treats some systems, but does not provide sustainable solutions for our health care system’s enduring problems.

Allergen Triggers Recall, Disposal of Millions of Pounds of Food

Big food manufacturers have found themselves faced with recalling millions of pounds of food intended for institutional settings, this time for an undocumented allergen. The problem raises a larger question about how the U.S. can guarantee a safe food supply if it isn’t closely monitoring the products in global supply chains.