A catch all category for government, politics and initiatives to influence either.

LEDs and the Sustainable Future of Emergency Response

In the emergency sector, where every second counts, the safety of lives and properties might solely hinge on the arrival time of first responders. But what about the lights that guide them?

Reinventing Industries to Bring Green Jobs to the Rural South

Many rural southern communities were hit hard by the economic downtown. In seeking to rebuild, instead of returning to traditional manufacturing, these three communities found growth in taking a greener approach to product and job creation.

The Most and Least Eco-Friendly States of 2015

As the celebration of Earth Month wraps ups, WalletHub’s recently-released study citing America’s most and least eco-friendly states takes the temperature of how we’re progressing toward a more environmentally healthy nation. Click through to see how your state stacks up.

Turkey Continues to Deny Armenian Genocide

From 1915 until 1923, about 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. Forced out of their homes and ancient land, they were made to walk death marches to the Syrian desert. Most died along the way. Even 100 years later, the Turkish government continues to deny that what happened was genocide.

Embracing a New Definition for Social Investing

Definitions — we are so over them in the social investing sector. Yet once in a while a new definition comes along, and we really need to pay attention. That’s the case with the definition for social investing proposed by a new report, After the Gold Rush, from the Alternative Commission on Social Investment (ACSI). This report highlights telling developments in the practice of social investing and yields a new, clarifying meaning for the term.

The Path to Mandated Municipal Composting

Municipal-scale food waste composting is available in only a handful of cities. So, why isn’t composting mandatory in cities and towns? At least four barriers need to be overcome.

California’s Hidden Water Consumer: Power Plants

As California suffers through its fourth year of record drought and Gov. Jerry Brown imposes mandatory water restrictions for the first time in the Golden State’s history, the debate rages on over who consumes the most water and who should be responsible for cutting back: farmers, residents or the beef industry? But there’s another major consumer of water in California and the United States: power plants.

Moving Natural Assets from the Drawing Board to the Board Room

Making an environmental case for preserving natural assets is straightforward, but explaining their value within financial and management strategies takes real innovation. A handful of pioneering municipalities are testing new approaches to integrate natural assets such as rivers, forests and foreshores into the core of urban management.

Research Group Blames Politics for Tax Filing Problems

Tax filing is a headache, and that’s why some 80 million Americans invest in professional tax preparation. But it doesn’t have to be that way, points out the nonpartisan organization Maplight. The research group did some digging and found that there are big names and big money standing in the way of a bill to simplify the tax filing system. The pockets are deep: to the tune of $35 million. And several top politicians own stock in the companies most fiercely opposed to tax filing reform.

Canada’s Green Energy: The Push for a New East-West Grid

Geography and economic benefits have dominated Canada’s power grid for years. Now, researchers are calling for a redesign that would allow Canada to upgrade its ailing power structure and improve its green energy. The results of this 20-year endeavor could make Canada a powerhouse in the energy sector. And it could benefit the U.S. as well.

Some Question New U.S. Plan to Combat Illegal Fishing

“[The government] wants to prevent illegal, unregulated [and] unreported fishing — they have an acronym for it, and when the government gets acronyms for things, watch out! Here it comes,” trade lawyer Robert Becerra said at 2015 Seafood Expo North America. He’s not the only one who’s wondering how the government plans to enforce its new regulations to curb IUU fishing.

Policy Points: How Tax Inversions Hurt Smaller Businesses

Unfortunately, this Tax Day, some companies will shoulder a smaller tax burden than others — a few will have none at all. It makes absolutely zero sense. And it’s all legal. One way companies can get their bill down to zero is through the process of a tax inversion. Here, a U.S. company buys a foreign competitor, then reincorporates the new company in the foreign country, where tax burdens are lower. This sleight of hand can have very real consequences for businesses.