A catch all category for government, politics and initiatives to influence either.

For the SDGs to Succeed, Combine Old and New Power

Many of us have heard about public-private partnerships and other multi-stakeholder initiatives. But what if we looked at a new type of partnership- between large organizations and a generation of grassroots change-makers looking to make a difference?

Companies, Communities Step Up to Inspire Nations to Help Syrian Refugees

If Nova Scotia’s Mi’kaq First Nations are successful in their petition to the Canadian government, the island of Cape Breton will be a new home for Syrian refugees. And if the Israeli company SodaStream gets its way, it will be able to provide jobs for 1,000 refugees – in Israel. A variety of companies and communities are stepping up to help the burgeoning flow of refugees – in some cases, to the consternation of their governments. Is this the new humanitarian movement, or just a gentle encouragement for governments to help? Either way, they are committed to making a difference in Syria’s humanitarian crisis.

The U.N. Tackles Sustainable Tourism, Sort Of

The U.N.’s proposed Sustainable Development Goals address sustainable tourism with three targets, for the first time. But, not everyone agrees on the path the new objectives point to, or if it’s even clear.

Voluntary Mechanisms to Mandatory Action

The $250 trillion firepower of the world’s capital markets needs actionable information to decarbonize their portfolios. Regulators need to make this mandatory.

Global Dairy Gets Sustainability: Now Where Do the Other Livestock Groups Stand?

After the FAO Livestock’s Long Shadow report was released in 2006, the dairy industry found itself at ground-zero for criticism as a major sector contributor to climate change. Less than a decade later, thanks to the efforts of the Global Dairy Agenda for Action, the sector is poised to be a leader in sustainability. How did this happen, and where are the other livestock groups?

Emissions from Melting Permafrost Could Cost $43 Trillion

Scientists are suggesting the Arctic should have renewed focus for another reason: climate change, accelerated by the melting of permafrost and resulting greenhouse gas emissions, could cost the global economy, in the long run, as much as $43 trillion.