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Oregon’s Climate Control Legacy

Oregon was on the leading edge of domestic climate policy in the late ’90s with the nation’s first carbon dioxide regulation, but it has not kept pace, admitting failure on its own climate impact goals established in 2007. There are several promising Oregon bills that would bring the state back to the forefront of climate action.

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Bike-Share Programs Extend into Underserved Neighborhoods

Studies show that communities with statistically recognized transportation issues benefit the most from having a bike-share option in their neighborhood. However, disproportionately, some of the most recognized bike-share programs in the country have been met with controversy for lack of equitable distribution in core neighborhoods characterized by less affluence.

Established in 2001, the nonprofit Oceana has committed itself to “achieving measurable change by conducting specific, science-based campaigns with fixed deadlines and articulated goals.”

How Good is That Environmental Nonprofit, Anyway?

Greenpeace rates tech companies on their data centers. Oxfam America ranks food brands on the sustainability of their supply chains. The League of Conservation Voters scores elected officials on their voting records. But who rates, ranks and scores Greenpeace, Oxfam America and the League of Conservation Voters​?​ ​Or The Nature Conservancy, Conservation International or WWF? ​For now, no one.

Climate change increases risks and vulnerabilities related to natural hazards such as drought, floods and storms. Increasingly, these disasters do not represent an acute, unpredictable “emergency,” so much as chronic human vulnerability to predictable, recurring risks. Traditional humanitarian response needs adapt accordingly.

Humanitarian Organizations Struggle to Keep Pace with Climate Change

The global humanitarian community is feeling the strain from increasing numbers of disasters. Climate change is a big contributor to the trend, as it increases risks and vulnerabilities from natural hazards such as drought, floods and storms and impacts peoples’ livelihoods, health and food systems. Leaders in the humanitarian community recognize that a shift must be made toward an approach that addresses the risks, shocks and stresses to which people are vulnerable, rather than only fixing problems after they occur. There are numerous good-practice examples that can be scaled-up to form the basis for systemwide change.

Police Lights

LEDs and the Sustainable Future of Emergency Response

In the emergency sector, where every second counts, the safety of lives and properties might solely hinge on the arrival time of first responders. But what about the lights that guide them?

Kiln operator at Horsehead Corp.

Reinventing Industries to Bring Green Jobs to the Rural South

Many rural southern communities were hit hard by the economic downtown. In seeking to rebuild, instead of returning to traditional manufacturing, these three communities found growth in taking a greener approach to product and job creation.

Wallet Hub

The Most and Least Eco-Friendly States of 2015

As the celebration of Earth Month wraps ups, WalletHub’s recently-released study citing America’s most and least eco-friendly states takes the temperature of how we’re progressing toward a more environmentally healthy nation. Click through to see how your state stacks up.

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Turkey Continues to Deny Armenian Genocide

From 1915 until 1923, about 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. Forced out of their homes and ancient land, they were made to walk death marches to the Syrian desert. Most died along the way. Even 100 years later, the Turkish government continues to deny that what happened was genocide.

Sen. Gaylord Nelson, often called the "father of Earth Day," chats with children in a Wisconsin marshland.

3p Weekend: The History of Earth Day — In Less Than 5 Minutes

Even as the cynic within us gripes about yet another Earth Day, it’s important to remember how the tradition began. Ready for a five-minute history lesson? Grab a fresh cup of coffee, and brush up on the history of Earth Day.

green shoot growing from a stack of coins

Embracing a New Definition for Social Investing

Definitions — we are so over them in the social investing sector. Yet once in a while a new definition comes along, and we really need to pay attention. That’s the case with the definition for social investing proposed by a new report, After the Gold Rush, from the Alternative Commission on Social Investment (ACSI). This report highlights telling developments in the practice of social investing and yields a new, clarifying meaning for the term.

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The Path to Mandated Municipal Composting

Municipal-scale food waste composting is available in only a handful of cities. So, why isn’t composting mandatory in cities and towns? At least four barriers need to be overcome.

U.S. power plants withdrew as much water as farms did and four times as much water as all Americans did in 2005, according to a report from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

California’s Hidden Water Consumer: Power Plants

As California suffers through its fourth year of record drought and Gov. Jerry Brown imposes mandatory water restrictions for the first time in the Golden State’s history, the debate rages on over who consumes the most water and who should be responsible for cutting back: farmers, residents or the beef industry? But there’s another major consumer of water in California and the United States: power plants.