A catch all category for government, politics and initiatives to influence either.

Former Shell Chairman Criticizes Industry Inaction on Climate

“Climate change is a problem that absolutely must be tackled, and it is a very urgent problem and the longer we leave it the more and more urgent it becomes,” said James Smith, former chair of Shell U.K. and current chair of the consultancy Carbon Trust.

EDF: Green Trucks Good for the Planet and Business

Heavy trucks haul about 70 percent of U.S. freight, gobbling nearly 2.5 million barrels of oil per day while producing nearly half-a-billion tons of carbon pollution a year, according to the report. By 2040 pollution from this sector is projected to increase by another 40 percent.

Horrors! Seattle is Moving to a $15/hour Minimum Wage

On June 2 the Seattle City Council unanimously approved the adoption of a $15 per hour minimum wage, making Seattle the first major city in America to take this type of action to address income inequality.

Healthy Forests Promoted Under California Cap-and-Trade

April marked a milestone for forest carbon projects when the California Air Resources Board issued the first forest carbon offsets to a project developed under their forestry protocol. The sustainable forest project is notable as a pioneer in this sector; demonstrating the complex and varied demands we place on forests. The project also exemplifies the important role carbon finance can play to diversify revenue and to tip the balance toward sustainable management with both local and global benefits.

Finland Aims for 80 Percent Emissions Cuts with New Climate Act

Finland contributes little in the way of global carbon emissions, but is disproportionately feeling the effects of climate change. Passage of the national climate change act reinforces and builds momentum as Finland moves to build a healthy, vital low-carbon economy and society.

Investor Ready Cities: From London to Rio de Janeiro

Yesterday, we went over a few success stories told in timely and valuable report from Siemens, PwC and Berwin Leighton Paisner. Here are three more inspiring snapshots that tell the story of cities moving towards a more sustainable future.

Farmers Insurance Drops Climate Change Lawsuits Against Chicago-Area Cities

Who should pay for the impacts of climate change? This conundrum was at the center of nine class action lawsuits filed by Farmers Insurance in April against dozens of cities in the Chicago area for failing to prepare for the floods that hit Illinois last spring. The insurance company had argued that local governments should have known that rising global temperatures would result in heavier rains and did not do enough to secure sewers and storm drains. But, in a surprising turn of events, Farmers withdrew the suits last week, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Add Some Spice to GDP with Sex and Drugs

Why not include sex and drugs in the GDP mix, as Italy and the United Kingdom have done? After all, those are economic activities, right?

Climate Change Liability: Holding the Perpetrators Responsible

Can the primary culprits of global warming be held liable for undermining efforts to combat climate change? That may sound like something a heavier, bearded Al Gore might have scribbled on a napkin in the middle of the night, but there’s reason to believe that it may not be so far-fetched. At least, that’s what a trio of high-profile environmental groups are suggesting.

Funding the Future: Innovative Ways Cities Are Paying for Infrastructure

Cities across the globe need to construct new transit systems, roads and utilities – or modernize their aging infrastructure – to adapt to the changing climate, reduce carbon emissions and support growing populations. But an important question remains: How will cities pay for such projects? A new report, “Investor Ready Cities,” compiled by engineering company Siemens, professional services network PwC and law firm Berwin Leighton Paisner, aims to help cities think about new ways to fund their infrastructure projects – by taking a fresh look at traditional funding models like taxes and user fees and by attracting private investors.

Report Charts Renewable Energy’s Rapid Advance Into the Mainstream Mix

Global renewable energy capacity rose 8.3 percent in 2013, fueled by technological advances, cost reductions and supportive government policies, particularly among developing countries, according to REN21’s sixth annual review. Solar power capacity has grown an average of over 54 percent over the past five years.

Renewable Energy Can Lead to Economic Boom, Report Finds

If we implement the right policies and frameworks, we can achieve large-scale deployment of renewable energy that creates jobs, increases incomes, improves trade balances and contributes to industrial development, according to a new report by the Clean Energy Ministerial’s Multilateral Solar and Wind Working Group.

The report, econValue – The Socio-economic Benefits of Solar and Wind Energy, analyzes the circumstances under which renewable energy can boost economies and benefit communities by studying the effects of solar and wind energy on the environment, economy, and society. Produced by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the report provides a framework to help policy makers analyse the various economic opportunities that may be offered by solar and wind sector development and the potential of various policy instruments to best realise those opportunities.