A catch all category for government, politics and initiatives to influence either.

Ridesharing Firms Struggle to Meet Needs of Americans with Disabilities

Like many living in San Francisco and other major cities across the United States, I have come to rely on transportation network companies (TNCs) such as Lyft, Uber, and Sidecar to get me around town. TNCs have revolutionized the way many of us get from Point A to Point B, but not for all of us — not yet, anyway. There is a small but significant group that has long been let down by public transportation — the disabled community — and TNCs are struggling to break this trend.

Prescription medication

Can California Make Drug Manufacturers Pay for Take-back?

Leftover prescription and over-the-counter drugs flushed down the toilet or tossed in the garbage can end up in oceans and waterways, polluting the environment and threatening human health. Cash-strapped jurisdictions across California have come up with a patchwork of programs to collect and safely dispose of these medications, but now one state senator is proposing a statewide solution with a more reliable funding source, introducing legislation that would require the pharmaceutical industry to finance and manage drug disposal across the Golden State.

Texas Flag

Fostering Sustainable Growth in North Texas as Overpopulation Mounts

In North Texas, the population of the 10-county Dallas-Fort Worth region is expected to grow from approximately 5.1 million in 2000 to 9.1 million in 2030. To mitigate the strains that will develop as cities expand, and to maximize the potential economic opportunity that well-managed cities can offer, North Texas needs a proactive approach to addressing the challenges of urbanization.

Panelists include from left, Moderator Claire Bonham-Carter, AECOM Director of Sustainable Development; Ann Chan, Deputy Secretary for Climate Change and Energy, California Natural Resources Agency; Brian D’Agostino, Senior Meteorologist, San Diego Gas & Electric; Alan Cohn, Director, Climate & Water Quality, New York City Department of Environmental Protection; Michelle Lapinski, Senior Advisor, Vauling Nature, The Nature Conservancy; and Mark Way, Head Sustainability Americas & Director, Group Risk Management, Swiss Re.

More Cities Identifying Climate Risk and Building Resilience

According to a recent CDP poll of 110 cities around the world, 98 percent of cities are reporting risk from climate change. But 71 percent of these cities are putting resilience plans in place to some extent, according to speakers at this year’s Climate Leadership Conference.

TCM

Carbon Capture Technologies More Welcome in U.S., Norwegian Firm Says

Carbon capture and storage technologies, designed to reduce emissions, are getting a better reception in the U.S. than in Europe, according to Technology Centre Mongstad (TCM), a Norwegian firm that tests the technology. A CNBC report based on interviews with TCM executives says the U.S. is a “more welcoming place” for CCS technology, at least at the moment, because Europe is recovering from a debt crisis and recession.

China smog

Chinese Man Sues Government Over Smog

China is infamous for its dangerously high levels of air pollution, and now one man is suing the government for failing to reduce the toxic smog. Li Guixin, who lives in a major industrial region of northern China surrounding Beijing, filed a complaint with a district court, urging the city’s environmental department to improve its efforts to control air pollution, Reuters reported last week.

Apple4

Apple CEO Tim Cook Tells Climate Deniers to Take a Hike

Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO and successor to Steve Jobs, is generally known as a man who, unlike his predecessor, has a cool head, and does not let his emotions influence his decisions or his behavior on the job. But that is apparently not the case when it comes to global warming. Nothing seems to get him steamed up more than a group of climate deniers, like the group that recently attended Apple’s annual shareholder meeting last Friday.

Steve Jobs

Lawsuit: Silicon Valley Under Scrutiny for $9 Billion in Wage Theft Conspiracy

An antitrust investigation conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice has led to a class action lawsuit against top tech companies. Filed on behalf of more than 100,000 Silicon Valley employees who claim wage suppression agreements robbed them of about $9 billion since 2000, the suit names Apple, Google, Intel and other major tech giants.

Windfloat-large_03

Seattle Company Plans First Offshore Wind Farm on Pacific Coast

If the lease request gets final approval, the WindFloat Pacific project would anchor the first offshore turbines in federal waters on the West Coast. It also would be the first in the nation to use triangular floating platforms instead of single piles driven into the ocean floor.

climate change oil

Shell Banks on Runaway Climate Change

Although Shell publicly supports mitigating climate change, its actions show it is banking on runaway climate change with tar sands and Arctic drilling.

In-N-Out

If In-N-Out Can Pay (a Lot) More Than Minimum Wage, Why Can’t McDonald’s?

In-N-Out Burger, a fast food chain in California and the Southwest, starts its employees off at a wage of $10.50 an hour. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez makes a good point. If In-N-Out Burger can do it–remain profitable and still provide what has arguably been deemed a superior product–why can’t McDonald’s?

Obama Pushes $1 Billion Climate Change ‘Resilience Fund’

Speaking against the backdrop of one of the worst droughts in California history, President Barack Obama on Friday announced plans to pitch to Congress a $1 billion climate change resilience fund intended to help communities facing climate change-induced negative weather.

Tallinn, Estonia

The Value of a Free Ride On Public Transit? Not Much, According to New Study

On Jan. 1, 2013, Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, became the first European capital to extend free public transport to all of its 430,000 residents. One of the main drivers was mobility for all, but does it really work? Is making public transportation free actually increasing mobility? While it might take some time to evaluate the economic impact of this change, a new study of three researchers from the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology provides an initial outlook into the changes in ridership following the introduction of free rides.