Researchers Compare the Carbon Pricetags of In-Store and Online Purchases

Mary Catherine O'Connor | Monday December 14th, 2009 | 8 Comments

online-shoppingFrom a carbon emissions point-of-view, is it better to buy products online or in a store? You probably guessed the former. And if so, you’re right, according to a study conducted by MindClick GSM, a sustainability consulting firm and released today by GigaOM Pro, a subscription based research and analysis service covering green IT (among other topics).

MindClick decided to use the two biggest shopping days of the year—Black Friday and Cyber Monday—as a launching point for their research. The National Retail Federation conducted a survey late last month in which it asked consumers about their anticipated spending over the Thanksgiving weekend. The results showed that, on average, consumers would spend $343 inside stores and $104 through online purchases.

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Suntrica Brings Mobile Connectivity to 3rd World and Gadget Lust to You

| Monday December 14th, 2009 | 1 Comment

suntricaImagine biking 25 miles to reach the nearest electricity source capable of powering your cell phone. According to UN research published in 2005, only 20% of Africans (excluding South Africa and Egypt) have access to reliable grid electricity, and this number falls to 2% in rural areas.  Consider that one more time. Only 2% of rural Africans have access to electric lights to scare the night away.

Couple that with the fact that the developing world is the fastest growing market for cell phones by a long shot. Worldwide, there are more than 2.4 billion cellphone users (2006 data) and 59 percent of these 2.4 billion people live in developing countries. This makes cellphones the first telecommunications technology in history to have more users there than in the developed world.

In countries where mobile technology has leapfrogged infrastructure power for mobile devices can be quite difficult to come by.

So while mobile connectivity represents a major opportunity for quality of life for the base of the pyramid the realities of the electric grid present a substantial stumbling block.

That’s where Suntrica comes in.

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Bright Green Comes to Copenhagen

3p Contributor | Monday December 14th, 2009 | 1 Comment

road-to-copenhagenBy Lee Barken, IT practice leader at Haskell & White, LLP

A royal panel (left to right): Royal Prince Haakon of Norway, Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden, Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark

A royal panel (left to right): Royal Prince Haakon of Norway, Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden, Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark

Up the road from the COP15 Climate Conference and just outside of downtown Copenhagen, 170 exhibitors gathered this weekend for the 2-day Bright Green conference, to demonstrate that climate change is both a dangerous peril and a pathway to profits. Bright Green, a showcase organized by the Confederation of Danish Industry, aims to show that the emission reductions currently being negotiated at COP15 will require a myriad of new industry solutions.

Judging by the turnout, it would appear that industry is more then ready to step up to the challenge and that the 10,000 attendees were not deterred by silent protest messages, such as “our climate is not your business” and “greenwashing,”, etched in chalk on adjacent sidewalks and walls leading to the Copenhagen Forum Center.

Inside the building, a maze of trade show booths greeted the curious and energetic crowd.  The eclectic mix of exhibitors included alternative energy companies, consultants, solution providers, product manufacturers and trade delegations from countries such as Canada, Finland, Denmark, France and the United States.

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How Cisco’s Technology Helps Make the World More Sustainable

Gina-Marie Cheeseman
| Monday December 14th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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Cisco Systems bills itself as the leader in “networked sustainability,” and organizers, knowing teleconferencing would be an important element at the COP15 events, launched a public tender for sponsors for our videoconferencing. Naturally, Cisco stepped in. Cisco’s Telepresence, the technology used for virtual meetings at COP15, is described on Cisco’s website as high quality audio, with high definition video and interactive features to “deliver an in-person meeting experience.”

“Cisco met our demands in terms of the company’s sustainability strategy, its corporate social responsibility (CSR) program and its adherence to the UN Global Contact, so they became the technology provider for the conference,” Olling said.

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Can the Words “Eco” & “Travel” Ever Go Together?

| Monday December 14th, 2009 | 10 Comments

Travel for goodIn recent decades, travel has become cheap, thereby allowing a large portion of the population to go wherever it pleases. While, at first glance, this seems a good thing, it has contributed in many ways to the increasing homogenization of world culture, and an increasing environmental footprint–something that more then 70 world leaders are meeting to discuss at this week’s COP15 meetings.

You’ve probably heard of ecotourism, traveling with a lighter impact and more meaningful experience, but you might be surprised to know that Travelocity, one of the major online travel agencies, has been running its Travel For Good program since 2006.

The program came not from some opportunistic marketing department, but from within the staff of the company, and it is composed of several people who wanted to find ways to make travel more meaningful, and help connect a more mainstream audience with voluntourism opportunities. When Travelocity reached out to its customers, it realized that there was a lot of interest out there as well, but consumers didn’t know where to look.

Like Walmart mainstreaming sustainable consumerism, Travelocity then set about creating Travel For Good.

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An Interview with Gordon Laird, Author of “The Price of a Bargain”

Frank Marquardt | Monday December 14th, 2009 | 0 Comments

LAIRD-book-jacket-smallGordon Laird’s new book, The Price of a Bargain: The Quest for Cheap and the Death of Globalization, looks at the global forces that have given rise to cheap goods. In the process, he identifies a series of instabilities that will very likely bring this phase of cheap consumer goods to a close, while also shifting the economic center of the world away from the United States toward China and the Middle East.

Triple Pundit talked to Baird, a media fellow emeritus for the Sheldon Chumir Foundation for Ethics in Leadership and an author whose other books include Power: Journeys Across an Energy Nation and Return of the Trojan Horse, about The Price of a Bargain.

Triple Pundit: What is The Price of a Bargain about?

Gordon Laird: At some level, it’s about interdependence. Since the 1970s, globalization has accelerated. It created new value for many people and conjoined national economies in the process, but also created new risk and crisis. Whether we like it or not, our world has been entwined in ways that are still mysterious to us, in ways that link our fortunes with those of Chinese factory workers. And a surprising amount of our prosperity is leveraged on having access to cheap energy, offshore labor, shipping, and consumer credit.

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A Human Right to Water and the Corporate Community

David Lewbin
| Monday December 14th, 2009 | 4 Comments

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At this year’s Corporate Water FootPrinting Conference, held in San Francisco December 2-3, the ongoing conversation about the human right to water received front and center billing. This spotlight was in stark contrast to last year’s event, where the subject was largely absent from the agenda and discussion. At that conference, the “water as a public right” NGO community was not on the guest list or in attendance. They were outraged by the notion and appearance that corporations were meeting privately behind closed doors, devising strategies for divvying up the world’s water resources.

In response, the NGO’s organized teach-ins, street protests and leveraged media coverage, the results of which cast a less than positive light on last year’s conference with respect to inclusiveness and transparency. This year, the conference organizers and sponsors, all the wiser from last year’s lack of stakeholder engagement faux pas, invited two H2O NGO’s, represented by Food and Water Watch and the As You Sow Foundation, to the proverbial watering hole.

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If You’re Feeling the COP15 Burnout, This Is the Satire for You

| Sunday December 13th, 2009 | 2 Comments

road-to-copenhagen

COP15 Activists at Work

COP15 Activists at Work

Don’t get me wrong, I am watching as eagerly as the rest of you. I’m thrilled that COP15 has garnered as much media attention as it has. It’s amazing. I don’t think that the consciousness of the world has ever been so fixated on a single environmental issue in my lifetime. It’s everything that I could hope for. But, I’ve been known to skim and article or two.

Who can blame me? There’s a ton of coverage, and not really much happening. David Roberts over at Grist put it best when discussing the non issue of the leaked Danish text:

Consider: Copenhagen maxed out on journalist registrations, at 5,000. (Supposedly there were more than 10,000 waiting in line after that.) The place is choked with journalists, not to mention folks from think tanks and NGOs who are supposed to be blogging. There are thousands of people crammed in a small area, all under instructions to update frequently with fresh news, all exhausted and stressed out, all hungry for something to write about.

On the flip side, virtually nothing of significance to an international agreement will be decided before the final days, perhaps the final hours, of the talks.

What are all those journalists going to write about?…. Most of all, they’ll report the hell out of it every time any representative of any government says anything about anything. Every bit of pre-positioning gossip and bluster will be blown up to billboard size. There is, in short, immense incentive to exaggerate the significance of every piece of “news.”

If you’re feeling the burn, this 2 minute bit of satire from NPR will be music to your ears.

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Noise Pollution Etiquette (or Reflect and Respect!)

CCA LiveE | Saturday December 12th, 2009 | 2 Comments

Noise Pollution

Waiting for the A train at the 34th Street subway a few months ago in New York City, I was assaulted by the amount of noise on the platform. Chirps, blips, clicks, squawks and music encircled me like ten thousand migrating geese.

I was unintentionally invited into: The very private argument of a young woman and her boyfriend, the squawking swap between two Nextel Direct Connect users, an ear-shattering concert through an iPhone speaker and the assault of a thumping ring tone from a teenager.

The technology landscape has changed the way we communicate with one another but what’s missing is the etiquette manual. With the enthusiastic embracing of new devices, people have lost awareness of the impact that their conversations have on those around them. Physical walls have vanished along with the technological umbilical cords that connected us to the outside world. Welcome to the new world of the personal “mobile home” office, one without boundaries or rules for airing your personal laundry for public consumption.

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Community Food Enterprise: Local Success in a Global Marketplace

Tori Okner | Saturday December 12th, 2009 | 0 Comments

16585The Wallace Center, a program at Winrock International, has just released a compelling report on the business of local food.

Funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Community Food Enterprise: Local Success in A Global Marketplace is a global survey on the economic, social, and environmental impact of local food.

Using the B Corporation Ratings System, the report analyzes a diverse selection of 24 food businesses. The assessment offers a rare piece of good news. In contrast to the common assumption that local food is a small, struggling, and poorly run movement by and for the rich, it concludes that the industry is maturing into a “centerpiece” of development.
The research initiative began with a mailing sent to over 10,000 people requesting nominations for exemplary local food businesses. The authors’ chose a diverse group. Half of the companies are located within the United States, half abroad. No two American businesses are within the same state, no two foreign companies from the same country. Together, the selected “community food enterprises” (CFE) represent the corporate and non-profit sectors, public-private partnerships, and cooperatives. They operate in various niches of the food system: in production, distribution, training. value-added, and the restaurant industry Their contributions to local economies, social enterprise, and food security is magnificent.

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“Leaked Text” Shows Movement in Climate Talks – Heavy Lifting Remains

| Friday December 11th, 2009 | 1 Comment

Copenhagen - the whole world is watchingThe talk in the halls of the Bella Center this afternoon revolved around the so-called “leaked text” of  papers presented in plenary sessions by the chairs of both working groups (AWG-KP and AWG-LCA) that broadly outline the current “state of play” in COP15 negotiations, as UNFCCC executive secretary Yvo de Boer characterized it at today’s press briefing.

The specific text of the document was, at last check, still not “cleared for the press,” but the “word on the street” is for a 50 percent cut in global emissions by 2050 (no surprise there), and an aggregate emissions reduction of 25 percent from developed countries by 2020 (all targets referenced to 1990 levels). The 2020 mid-term target implies steeper cuts from developed nations than what has thus far been offered. (Update: draft texts are now available for the AWG-LCA andAWG-KP)

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News Brief: Is “Legally Binding” Back on the Table?

| Friday December 11th, 2009 | 1 Comment

COP15 - the whole world is watchingI am just now at a daily press briefing by Climate Action Network International at the COP15 climate conference in Copenhagen. Tove Ryding of Greenpeace has suggested that, in large part due to the actions this week of small island nations, especially Tuvalu, and other of the more vulnerable states that have demanded action aggressive action from the international community in the coming days in Copenhagen, that “legally binding” is now back on the table.

In a few minutes there will be the daily briefing from Yvo de Boer. It will be interesting to see what the official word from the UNFCCC will be.

Ministers begin arriving tomorrow for informal talks, and heads of state on Wednesday.

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“Cost Less, Mean More”: A $10 Trillion Product Revolution

Bill Roth | Friday December 11th, 2009 | 2 Comments

Recycle graphicAn Australian expression I love and use constantly is “No worries!” That phrase captures the essence of an entrepreneur’s faith. And it captures my faith that it will be our entrepreneurs, rather than government, that lead the way in figuring out solutions to our current environmental and economic mess. My attendance at the Cleantech Open re-enforced this faith as I enjoyed an entire day listening to entrepreneurs pitching how their green products will save the planet, grow jobs and make money. And here’s the key maturation in green business that has just occurred this year. ALL of these entrepreneurs had price competitiveness at the core of their green product designs.

Achieving price competitiveness drives my economic analysis projecting a $10 trillion global annual revenue sustainable economy by 2017. This projection is based upon cutting-edge market research documenting that consumers will almost always buy the green product if it is at price parity with the non-green product. Market researchers have branded this shift in consumer behavior as a search for cost less, mean more solutions. And the great news for our economy and environment is that our entrepreneurs are now launching a green product revolution covering market segments from construction materials to chemicals to energy that is focused upon selling “cost less, mean more” solutions.

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FAO Program Promotes Low-Emission Farming

Bill DiBenedetto | Friday December 11th, 2009 | 1 Comment

15826_FAO_Indonesia_J_M_MicaudNot to be too outdone by their COP 15 colleagues grabbing the world’s attention this week in Copenhagen, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization moved on a couple of climate change and food security fronts, including the launch of a multi-donor program to support sustainable, low-emission agriculture practices in developing nations.

FAO announced that Finland, the first country to participate in the program, will kick-in $3.9 million over the 2010-2011 period. The agency intends to approach other potential donors for further funding under the five-year initiative.

On a separate track, FAO is hooking up with Brazil on a large-scale project to collect data on emissions and deforestation via satellite.

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The Global Water Challenge: Four Novel Solutions

Jennifer Elder, The Sustainable CFO | Friday December 11th, 2009 | 0 Comments

Access to water is not always easy or safe

Access to water is not always easy or safe

“There are 84 million people without water.  More children die from bad water than from HIV and malaria combined.  But solutions abound.”  Those were the words of hope spoken by Cheryl Choge from Global Water Challenge at the Net Impact 2009 Conference.  Cheryl and Tito Llantada of Ashoka Changemakers discussed the winning ideas from the Changemakers/Global Water Challenge Contest and what they learned from the first competition.

The contest, which ended in March 2009, sought solutions for clean water and safe sanitation.  All entries were judged on their ability to be sustainable, replicable, and scalable.  The contest drew an amazing 265 entries from 54 countries.  The number and variety of entries demonstrated the breadth of global ingenuity and proved that there are viable low cost solutions to global water issues.  The winner and three finalists shared one million in prize money donated by the CocaCola Foundation.

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