The National Climate Seminar – Preparing the Public for the UN Climate Change Conference

| Tuesday August 25th, 2009 | 0 Comments

globe-in-hands

This December could be a make-or-break month in terms of, well, saving the world. “Decisions that we will make – or not make – [during the UN Climate Change Conference in December] will have profound impacts [on] the next five thousand generations. Will we, this year, establish the architecture that can rewire the entire planet with clean energy… help lift billions of people out of poverty, and stabilize the global climate?” Good points, posed by the National Climate Seminar on its website. The Seminar will attempt to improve public awareness – a crucial component of the Conference’s success – by hosting a bi-weekly phone series on climate change. The Seminar is expected to engage educators, scientists, politicians, and everyday Americans in the issues.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

podium[Your News Here]

Double the Pleasure: Recycle Your Old Sex Toys

| Tuesday August 25th, 2009 | 18 Comments

dildobin_bigStop filling up your garbage can with cheaply made vibrators. No more broken dildos piling up in landfill. Now you can recycle your old sex toys!

Yes, that’s recycle, not reuse, which is where my mind initially jumped.

According to the Recycle my Sex Toy site: “Finally, there’s an environmentally friendly way to dispose of used or broken vibrators, dildos, plugs, or any other sex toy you may have. Our Sex Toy Recycling program offers you a way to recycle sex toys that you no longer want or use.”

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Wind Energy: Mapping Out a Global Trend

Jeff Siegel | Monday August 24th, 2009 | 1 Comment

A few weeks ago, construction began on the first of seven 10-gigawatt wind power bases in China.

I initially wrote about these wind power bases last month, when the vice president of the Chinese Wind Association announced the project— which is to be completed by 2020. Certainly this is a major part of China’s wind power goal of 100 gigawatts by 2020.

But as I’ve said time and time again, this is a global trend. And while new government support in China and the United States is providing fertile ground for growth and opportunity, wind energy momentum is not constrained by borders.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Greenpeace Faux Pas Raises Debate About Sensationalizing Climate Change

| Monday August 24th, 2009 | 4 Comments

Last week, a lede in the Guardian UK’s environment blog read: “Greenpeace’s sea ice ‘mistake’ delights climate change sceptics (sic).” Apparently, in a recent interview on BBC, a Greenpeace expert went on air and said that the Arctic is looking at ice free summers as early as 2030. He, in fact, meant to say sea ice-free summers, citing research inspired by NASA focused on Greenland.



Gerd Leipold, the executive director of the environmental organization, then went on to say, “As a pressure group, we have to emotionalise issues and we’re not ashamed of emotionalising issues.” Despite what is seemingly a small omission, the Guardian reported that Leipold’s slip-up gave ammo to the many climate change detractors out there. The environmental advocacy group was quick to issue a defense, claiming that the context in which Leipold was speaking was obvious that he was referring to sea ice and not the land-based ice sheet of the Arctic, and the phrasing he used was in line with terminology used in the initial NASA study.

It appears, however, that what most critics have latched onto is not the specific data regarding Arctic ice melts, but the underlying ethos by which Greenpeace operates. “Admitting you don’t mind emotionalising issues,” writes the Guardian blogger, “gives ammunition to critics that will then use to say you are prone to exaggerating the facts.” One blog claimed Leipold’s comment highlights the fact that Greenpeace is “doing more harm than good by overselling alarmism.”

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Southface Eco Office: A Green Building that Can Prove It

| Monday August 24th, 2009 | 2 Comments

Photo: © 2009 Jonathan Hillyer/Atlanta

Photo: © 2009 Jonathan Hillyer/Atlanta

Talk about checking all the boxes on the green building list, literally. The recently completed Southface Eco Office has achieved Platinum LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, qualifies for Energy Star, EarthCraft Light Commercial certification and meets the 2030 Challenge launched by the non-profit group Architecture 2030. Whew, that’s impressive!

The building, located in Atlanta, Georgia, stands at three stories and encompasses 10,100 square feet and uses 84 percent less potable water and 53 percent less energy than a comparable building. Designed by Lord, Aeck & Sargent, the Eco Office was made possible by the collaboration of over 200 organizations donating their time, materials and financial resources towards the project, which not only serves as an office, but doubles as a demonstration and training facility, showcasing the possibilities for high performance buildings to reduce operating costs.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Cost/Benefit Analysis of Walking?

| Monday August 24th, 2009 | 8 Comments

2322608787_fcc7e96f17

One of the most cited reasons for choosing to live in an urban environment is “walkability.” A walkable city gives residents the ability to get around on foot and provides places to walk to, like shopping areas, transit stops and schools. A compact, walkable neighborhood encourages healthier lifestyles, protects the environment and saves energy by reducing our dependence on cars. Furthermore, they create a sense of community and generate stakeholder involvement around community related initiatives. Not only does living in a walkable community make personal economic sense, but it makes economic sense on a larger scale as well. In the current housing slump, homes located in walkable communities are more likely to hold their value and may even appreciate once the recession ends. These benefits and economic indicators prompt the question, would you pay more for walkability? If so, do the costs justify the benefits?

A key principle of smart growth is the development of walkable communities, but another goal is to make homes in metropolitan regions affordable and accessible to jobs and essential services. Families in search of their piece of the American Dream increasingly must drive farther and farther into the exurbs to find homes with mortgages they can afford. A report released on August 18th shows that home buyers are paying more for homes in neighborhoods where you can get around without wheels. The study, conducted by CEOs for Cities, explores the connection between home values and walkability, as measured by the Walk Score algorithm. The report looked at 94,000 real-estate transactions in 15 markets across the country. Researchers found that in 13 of the markets, housing values were higher in more walkable neighborhoods. Data showed these “walkable” community houses commanded $4,000 to $34,000 more than those in communities with average walkability.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

The Business of Compost: Recovering Organic Waste

Wes Muir | Monday August 24th, 2009 | 0 Comments

CompostBy Wes Muir, Director, Communications, Waste Management

Americans love food. You can’t drive more than a few blocks in any town without passing by a restaurant, fast food joint or grocery store. And after each meal or snack, we also throw out much of our uneaten food. Those scraps that don’t end up in the mouth of a family pet are instead sent to the family trash can.

These food scraps, along with leaf, yard and wood wastes, which emit carbon when they decompose, are known as organic waste. Organic waste accounts for about two-thirds of the total solid waste stream in the U.S., yet it is also often forgotten when considering practices like reducing, reusing and recycling waste. If you take a look at your own trash can right now, more than likely you’ll find that much of it contains organic waste.

Food scraps, in particular, are the single largest part of the municipal solid waste stream by weight. In 2007, nearly 12.5 percent of the total waste generated in the U.S. included food leftovers. An even more sobering statistic shows that only about three percent of food waste was recovered. Fortunately, alleviating the amount of food waste we trash can be a simple process, both at home and with the help of local municipalities.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Is ExxonMobil a Green Company?

Gina-Marie Cheeseman
| Monday August 24th, 2009 | 0 Comments

200px-Exxon_logo.svgForbes Magazine recently picked Exxon Mobil Corp as its “Green Company of the Year.” Forbes praised Exxon for putting “$600 million into algae farms that would turn sunlight into automotive fuel,” and for the company’s increased drilling for natural gas. Exxon has almost completed a $30 billion project to “develop the world’s biggest natural gas field” in Qatar. When completed, the project in Qatar will make Exxon the world’s biggest producer of natural gas by a company that is not government controlled.

Exxon, the world’s largest publicly traded oil and natural gas company, pled guilty in a Denver federal court to killing migratory birds in five states. Exxon agreed to pay $600,000, $400,000 in fines and $200,000 in community service payments, and has already spent over $2.5 million to create a plan to prevent bird deaths at its facilities. Most of the birds died from exposure to hydrocarbons) in uncovered natural gas well reserve pits and waste water storage facilities.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Bon Appétit Management Company: Leading the Way on Sustainable Food

| Monday August 24th, 2009 | 0 Comments

sus food2By Deborah Fleischer, Green Impact

What do Reed College, the University of San Francisco and Oberlin College have in common? They all recently received an “A” grade for their food and recycling efforts from the College Sustainability Report Card.

And behind their success is not Sustainable Food for Dummies nor Cliff Notes. Supporting their food programs is Bon Appétit Management Company, a caterer based in Palo Alto, California, with a deep commitment and track record of leadership in the field of sustainable food. While they serve large corporate clients, including Google and EBay, they also have a long list of education food service clients.

Large institutional buyers have the purchasing power to help shift the food system in a more sustainable direction. And a partner like Bon Appétit can help make the shift easier.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Cluetrain 2.0 at SXSW – Can You Help?

| Sunday August 23rd, 2009 | 5 Comments

SXSWPanelPicker-lgEvery March in Austin the South by Southwest Interactive Media conference kicks off. The event attracts thought leaders on a wide spectrum of technology, mostly digital. Think of it as junior TED conference with a lot more twittering. Despite implications that readers of 3P might find obvious, sustainability and business have always been secondary threads to the ‘gee whiz’ factor of the latest Drupal theme.

A number of worthy panel propositions at next years’ conference aim to bring the sustainability conversation more prominence where it needs to be. Three of them involve 3P contributors Nick Aster, Ryan Mickle & Gennefer Snowfield as well as 3P friend and ally Rob Reed (aka Max Gladwell).

As a key part of the selection process, SXSW takes community voting into account – that’s where you come in. Without further ado, please take a minute to vote for these panels if you have a few minutes:

1) Cluetrain 2.0: Environment, Society, Economy
2) Can Social Media Change Global Consciousness?
3) Putting a Fork in the 30 Second Spot

If you are planning to be in Austin next March, please let us know via a comment below and we’ll get you on the list for other sustainability-focused events we’re working on. We would love to see you there.

Permalink discuss Discuss This »

The U.S. Capitol’s New Energy Efficient Hat (Maybe)

| Saturday August 22nd, 2009 | 3 Comments

capitol-dome-nighttime

If lighting is the jewelry of a piece of architecture, the U.S. Capitol may soon be dressing to impress – if Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has her way. Pelosi is seeking to illuminate the Capitol dome with energy efficient lighting, making it a literal, physical example of environmental responsibility.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

The Good Entrepreneur – Catalyzing Change by Supporting Good Ideas

| Friday August 21st, 2009 | 0 Comments

ban-startup-friday

idea-lightbulb-b&wFor The Good Entrepreneur contest, the notion that an idea can change the world is not an idealistic daydream; it is one of the contest’s motivating forces. The Good Entrepreneur is designed to help green startups with triple bottom line ideas realize those ideas, thereby promoting environmental and economic growth as well as entrepreneurialism. In doing so, the contest also highlights and rewards the inspiration, innovation, and practically inherent in green startups’ development processes. However, while the quantitative impact of implementing contestants’ ideas is important, perhaps even more significant are the contest’s greater implications for the long-term sustainability movement.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

The Little Lunchbox That Could

| Friday August 21st, 2009 | 4 Comments

ban-startup-friday

When I was younger, the most difficult thing to get a kid to do was eat brussel sprouts. And even when Peter claimed to like them on the Brady Bunch, it was still a tough sell. So, imagine how difficult it is to get kids to eat healthy nowadays, or more importantly, get them to recycle and pay attention to the environment. Well, Goodbyn, a new eco-start up, aims to do just that with a creative lunchbox that organizes lunch in ways that invite healthy preparation and is fun for kids!

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Samasource: Planting Seeds for Fair Trade Outsourcing

Mary Catherine O'Connor | Friday August 21st, 2009 | 0 Comments

ban-startup-friday

Chirayath (right) and trainees in Dadaab.

Chirayath and trainees in Dadaab.

Increasingly, organizations that work toward ending poverty in underdeveloped parts of the world are basing their efforts on teaching skills and providing tools for those populations in need–rather than providing them with aid, such as food or other resources. It’s the whole teach-a-man-to-fish principle, and it appears to be catching on in governmental aid efforts, if the $20 billion food security plan that President Obama announced at last week’s G8 meetings in Italy is an indication. This plan is designed to provide seeds and other tools that can be used to help not just feed but sustain the world’s poor.

Samasource, a Bay Area startup, is taking a similar tack, which is spelled out quite clearly in its guiding mission: give work, not aid. But whereas similar organizations focus on building out the agricultural or transportation infrastructures in places such as Africa (Kickstart International and Zambikes/Bamboosero are great examples), Samasource is focused on linking people with computer-based work.

Though it is a non-profit, Samasource works as a bridge between profit-based, socially-responsible companies and marginalized people in countries such as Africa and throughout Asia, linking them with Internet-based work. Samasource screens and then provides training and project management tools to small businesses and nonprofit training centers in the poorest parts of the world. It then connects them with US clients interested in outsourcing computer work.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »

Clean Tech Open: The Top Three Green Challenges for Start-Ups

| Friday August 21st, 2009 | 1 Comment

ban-startup-friday

Clean Tech logo-mainBy Deborah Fleischer, Green Impact

I had the opportunity to be a sustainability coach to some of the Clean Tech Open semifinalists earlier this week. The Clean Tech Open is an organization of leading entrepreneurs, academics, investors and companies, working together to accelerate the development of clean technology start-ups.

In addition to getting support around marketing, finance and intellectual property issues, the Annual Business Competition provides green mentoring and sustainability workshops to help clean tech entrepreneurs integrate sustainability into their business plans.

I was one of five volunteer advisers; over the day we met with a range of start-ups in 45-minute sessions.  They gave a pitch and we then drilled down deeper into the issues associated with the environmental benefits of their product, the life cycle issues raised by manufacturing and the pitch to stakeholders.

Click to continue reading »

Permalink CONTINUES » discuss Discuss This »