Meters Are Getting Smarter, But Are They Secure?

Mary Catherine O'Connor | Thursday June 18th, 2009 | 0 Comments

Smart MeterThe wonder of the Internet – its ability to provide both instant and constant access to data – is merging with our electricity meters and with the appliances inside our homes as the vision of the new, improved, smart grid comes into focus. But, just as with the dawn of the Internet, the smart meter – a key component of the smart grid – might usher in a whole host of privacy problems and data land mines.
That’s the finding of Joshua Pennell and Michael Davis, president and senior security consultant, respectively, for computer security firm IOActive. The pair have published an article in energy industry publication Energy Pulse describing their findings on the security protections – or lack thereof – being built into smart meters (also known as advanced metering infrastructure, AMI meters).
They claim that IOActive researchers have been able to hack into smart meters and found that they could manipulate them in a number of ways that are representative of major weaknesses in hardware design. “Vulnerabilities in the smart grid could cause utilities to lose system control of their metering infrastructure to unauthorized third parties, exposing them to fraud, extortion attempts, lawsuits, widespread system interruption, massive blackouts or worse,” they note in the article.

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Solar Traffic Controls: Beaming Solar Light for All of Us

Bill DiBenedetto | Thursday June 18th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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If there’s a need for flashing warning lights at school crossings, pedestrian walkways, freeway off-ramps, train and wildlife crossings, Solar Traffic Controls LLC has it covered.
The Tempe, AZ company is using the Smart Relay technology developed by IDEC Corporation in the development and design of a host of “reliable and affordable solutions for advance traffic systems,” says Joe Wise, STC’s president.
Since its start by Wise in 2001, the company has provided solar-powered traffic control systems to city, state and federal transportation agencies; police, firefighting and public works departments; facility maintenance and plant safety industries.

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Dubai: The Las Vegas of the Persian Gulf

| Thursday June 18th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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It’s hard to believe that, until the 1990′s, Dubai was little more than a desert tent city. A brief history of what is perhaps the world’s least sustainable metropolis: electricity arrived in the 1950′s, oil was discovered in the 1960′s, the population tripled in the 1970′s, trade and labor laws loosened in the 1980′s, and petrodollars sponsored the building boom of the 1990′s. The Burj Al Arab, the world’s only “seven-star” resort, ushered Dubai onto the worldstage in 1994. An unbelievable amount of oil money (it is said the the United Arab Emirates sit on 10% of the world’s oil reserves) coupled with the desire to define Dubai as the “Mecca” of international tourism has quickly created a huge, sprawling, fantastical, over-the-top playground for the rich and powerful. Dubai was once famous for its architectural windcatchers, natural Persian ventilation systems from the 18th century that functioned as pre-industrial solar chimneys. Now it is famous for supertall skyscrapers, manmade islands and indoor ski resorts.

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Increasing Ethanol in Gasoline Equals Diaster

Gina-Marie Cheeseman
| Thursday June 18th, 2009 | 1 Comment

180px-E85_fuel.svg.pngAdding more corn-based ethanol into gasoline will create a higher demand for corn, which will raise the price of corn. In short, it’s a recipe for disaster, according to three recent studies. A study by Advanced Economics Solutions concluded that corn prices “will be much higher and more volatile” if corn-based ethanol production increases. If corn acreage “does not grow significantly” more than half of the corn crop in the U.S. “will be diverted from food and feed to fuel if corn ethanol production grows to 22.1 billion gallons.”

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Magic Beans for 100 Nuclear Power Plants

Jeff Siegel | Thursday June 18th, 2009 | 18 Comments

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At some point you just have to ask yourself, what is it that these politicians are getting to push nuclear energy so hard?
Last week, House Republicans called for a hundred new nuclear power plants to be built in the next two decades. They say that this is part of the legislation they’re backing because it’s better than what the Democrats are offering.

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Heineken Wobo Bottle: A Solution To Sustainable Housing Before its Time

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 20 Comments

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The TriplePundit European tour had an interesting break today at the Heineken Brewery in Amsterdam. Easily one of the world’s most recognizable brands, Heineken’s brewery tour itself was an impressive, if somewhat over-the-top exploration of marketing saavy. Somewhere on the tour they may have mentioned brewing beer.

With an eye for sustainability, I would not have been particularly impressed if not for a small display explaining what can only be described as a genius Triple Bottom Line idea way before its time – the Wobo bottle of the early 1960s.

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Let me explain…

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Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Sources Up 12% in 1st Quarter

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 0 Comments

In it’s Electric Power Monthly report released Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) states that non-hydro renewable energy expansion continues to clip along with double-digit growth.

Compared with the first quarter of 2008, the EIA reports that electrical generation from all renewable sources increased 7.2% in the first quarter of 2009, accounting for 10% of the nation’s electricity production. Conventional hydro power increased 4.6% while all other sources of renewables (biomass, wind, geothermal, and solar) rose by 12.4%

In just the month of March ’09 alone, renewables accounted for 10.9% of net electrical generation in the U.S. (conventional hydro providing 6.9% of that total and all other renewable sources about 4%). Of particular note is wind power, with net generation some 38.5% higher in March ’09 than in March ’08

Conversely, use of coal and natural gas has plummeted, while nuclear power generation remaining essentially stagnant. Net electrical generation from all sources dropped 4.3% in March ’09 compared with March ’08, the eighth consecutive month of decline when compared with the same calendar month of the previous year. Coal generation dropped 15.3%.

“Apologists for the nuclear and fossil fuel industries persist in trying to mislead the public by repeatedly spreading the myth that renewables account for only a tiny fraction of U.S. electricity production,” said Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign. “However, the hard numbers document the continuing dramatic growth in renewable energy’s already-significant contribution to the nation’s electricity supply – a contribution that will eventually leave coal and nuclear behind in the dust.”

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Coke’s New PlantBottle: Fluff or Real Progress?

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 3 Comments

coke%20bottling%20plant.jpgAs a blogger, I get a lot of oversized proclamations crossing my desk, so of course I was curious when I learned Coca-Cola had created PlantBottle, made from 30% plant materials, yet still recyclable with the regular PET plastic used for the majority of beverage containers out there on the market today.
I had questions about it and I imagine you would too, so I spoke with Scott Vitters, Director, Sustainable Packaging at Coca Cola to find out more.
Why not 100% plant based? Others have done that successfully for years now, why the foot dragging? It turns out this is no foot dragging, but a rather pragmatic, holistic view of the business ecosystem. If you create a completely green product, but it has limited applications and isn’t worth anything in the post consumer market, then it’s a failure, in many ways. Many biopolymer (fully plant based) bottles can’t handle carbonated or hot beverages, Vitters shared.
In Coca-Cola’s case, they understand that it’s not about focusing on greening one single aspect of a product and going for the publicity. This often results in a product that then compromises in some other aspect.

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Greenwala.com: A Conscious Collective

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 5 Comments

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Philanthropy and green tend to go hand in hand because they’re both rooted in consciousness — for the planet and for the people who inhabit it. And as I attempt to highlight in this series, it’s not only perfectly acceptable for profit to be part of that equation, but it actually helps sustain those conscious activities in the long-term by making a difference that extends far beyond just dollar donations. To help crystallize my ongoing quest to define for-profit philanthropy and carve out a scalable blueprint for repeating it across verticals, I connected with Rajeev Kapur, founder of Greenwala.com, a social network dedicated to promoting a green lifestyle and the collective good.
A highly targeted community of environmentally-minded members, Rajeev is able to tap into motivated users to extend the reach for the non-profits he supports, facilitating an ongoing network of awareness and change for important social issues and causes. Plus, it serves as a comprehensive resource on all things green from eco-products to renewable energy to volunteering and activism. Each user represents an opportunity to make a difference, and Rajeev has many initiatives in place to make that an everyday occurrence.

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Is Mainstream Media the Right Tool for Philanthropy?

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 0 Comments


There’s a show out there called, “I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here!” Some of you may have heard of it, many others perhaps not. It’s a reality TV show on NBC that features B-list celebrities, like Lou Diamond Phillips, two Baldwin brothers, and America’s favorite power couple from MTV’s The Hills.
It’s a spinoff of a British/Australian reality TV show that has a very similar tenor to Big Brother. Yet, this one has one very big difference. The celebrities are competing for charities.
Photo Source: NBC

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Clever Financing Gets California Back On Track

Bill DiBenedetto | Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 0 Comments

cal-flag.jpgCalifornia: where the sun always shines except when it doesn’t, it’s implementing a tax-credit bond program specifically designed to fund renewable energy projects.
Another in the long line of the cumbersomely named “alphabet soup programs” that the state seems to love, CREBs, or clean renewable energy bonds, was jump-started by State Treasurer Bill Lockyer this week with the sale of $20 million of these bonds to install solar panels in 70 California Department of Transportation facilities.
California’s Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing Authority (yep that’s CAEATFA) sold the tax-credit bonds last week on behalf of Caltrans. They’ll have a 1.45 percent interest rate over the 15-year term of the bonds.

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Green Innovators Unconference Coming to Boston, Bay Area and Austin

| Wednesday June 17th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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Environmental Defense Fund and Ashoka are organizing three upcoming Green Innovators Unconferences in Boston, Silicon Valley and Austin. The goal of these gatherings is to connect participants with other innovators to share experiences and ideas, explore new trends and opportunities and brainstorm out-of-the-box solutions to the challenges we’re all facing.
Unlike traditional conferences, there are no formal panels or speeches. They use an participatory, “open space” format. All participants will have an opportunity to share, discuss, network, collaborate and learn throughout the day. For those of you familiar with other meeting facilitation models, think Future Search meets World Cafe with a dash of Open Space thrown in.

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Living Machine System Cleans Wastewater, Removes Strain on “Sewage Grid”

| Tuesday June 16th, 2009 | 1 Comment

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Photo Source: Wired.com
Jim Fouts, the mayor of Warren, Michigan, a suburb just outside of Detroit, says that our aging water infrastructure is a “a ticking time bomb that’s ready to go off.” A report by the EPA cites that repairing and renovating public water systems will require $334.8 billion over two decades. And as lawmakers debate over banking reform or universal health care, it appears that our nation’s pressing water issues will not be addressed from a policy level.
Enter the Living Machine. Worrell Water Technologies’ Living Machine system works with existing building and municipal water infrastructures to clean wastewater for reuse. It utilizes planned wetlands, often times trees in the lobby of a building, using soil, bacteria, and “specially engineered films of beneficial microorganisms” to kill pathogens in the water.

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Corporations Can See the Good in Fresh Green Produce

| Tuesday June 16th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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Will Allen is a man to know. The recipient of one of last year’s MacArthur “genius grants”, the former NBA player has become one of the world’s foremost experts in urban agriculture, running the unassuming “Growing Power” organization on Milwaukee’s far north side. Will and Growing Power have perfected methods of urban farming that produce impressive quantities of fresh produce (including farmed fish) that winds up on the plates of folks who otherwise don’t have access to quality, healthy food.
The organization also runs a successful CSA program, supplies some of the finer restaurants in Milwaukee and Chicago, offers workshops for interested parties, and employs and educates inner city youths with little opportunity to learn about healthy eating and the idea of “food justice”.
Now, major corporations are starting to notice, and that’s a good thing.

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Closing the Loop: UPS’s E-Waste Disposal Supply Chain

| Tuesday June 16th, 2009 | 3 Comments

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The ever-growing amount of e-waste generated by our increasingly computer-driven, network-connected societies poses significant economic and product design challenges, as well as environmental and health problems, in countries the world over.
The US Environmental Protection Agency reported that electronics, or e-waste, is among the fastest growing components of municipal solid waste streams, accounting for around 2% of them at present. Some 157 million computer products and 126 million cell phones were discarded in the US in 2007, according to the EPA.
Since 2000, air freight and logistics industry giant UPS has been tackling the issue by closing the “production-consumption-disposal” loop and building an e-waste disposal supply chain. More than 25 million pounds of e-waste have been processed since the program’s start, with the annual average falling between 2 million and 3 million pounds, Robert Gamer, UPS’s e-waste coordinator, told Triple Pundit.
*Photo courtesy UPS

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