Peter’s Path: Making Philanthropy Fashionable

| Monday March 30th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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Most companies who engage in for-profit philanthropy add that element in later as a reaction to consumer demand or to remain viable in a a market that’s shifting toward corporate consciousness and social responsibility. Few are created with the sole intent of giving back. And fewer still forge a personal connection with consumers and causes, which is essential for building brand loyalty and making a sustainable impact. But Peters Path, an online clothing and accessory store, was built primarily as a vehicle for doing good — not only through monetary donations, but with a staff who is dedicated to committing time and resources to help nonprofits advance their missions.
Founded by Christine Peters, the goal of Peters Path is to promote conscious consumerism by transforming retail purchases that consumers already make into ongoing charitable activities. In addition to their efforts to support organic products and reduce their carbon footprint by running an eco-friendly business, they give consumers a choice as to where the proceeds of their purchase will go, creating a personal tie to the cause, and a reason to return to keep their selected charity thriving. In an oversaturated space where retail shopping is a primary activity, Peters Path has found a way to rise above the clutter and make meaningful connections with users, proving that doing good is always in fashion.

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GM CEO Resigns Opening the Door to Innovation in the Showroom

| Monday March 30th, 2009 | 1 Comment

jetsons.jpgIt’s time for GM shake up its business model. Over the past few months the headlines have been filled with news about the big US automakers, their desperate situation and their inability to turn a profit. This is quite laughable for those of us on the green side of the spectrum, given that the US automakers have fought for 20 years against increased fuel efficiency standards and now no one wants to buy their bloated cars. Another great example of bullheadedness is GM’s missed opportunity to leap ahead of the competition with the EV1. GM has dragged its heels with every opportunity to change its business model and actually produce something consumers want to buy. It’s time for this behemoth to stop thinking about itself merely as a car manufacturer and start thinking of itself as a transportation company with all the flexibility of product and service offerings that implies.

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What Does the White House Organic Garden Mean to the Green Economy?

Scott Cooney | Monday March 30th, 2009 | 3 Comments

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Two sets of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCV) had made public campaigns calling on Barack Obama to rip out part of the expansive White House lawn and plant an organic garden. Dan Simon and Casey Gustowarow championed the WHOFarm (White House Organic Farm) Project, while Amanda Fuller and Justin Mog (RPCV-Paraguay) created their campaign around Obama’s campaign slogan, referring to it as a “Hope Garden.” Michael Pollan, author of several books about sustainable food systems (Omnivore’s Dilemma, In Defense of Food), advocated for the garden as well as a “symbolically resonant step in building a new American food culture.”
It was not an unprecedented suggestion: Eleanor Roosevelt’s World War II Victory Garden is well known, and started millions of Americans gardening. Less well known is that Woodrow Wilson allowed sheep to graze and fertilize the White House lawn to save resources during WWI and that John Adams had a vegetable garden at the White House in 1800.
Though we’re not in a World War right now, it can be argued that we are fighting for our very survival with economic and environmental perils everywhere we turn. As Obama himself mentioned:

Our agricultural system is built on cheap oil. As a consequence, our agriculture sector actually is contributing more greenhouse gases than our transportation sector. And in the meantime, it’s creating monocultures that are vulnerable to national security threats, are now vulnerable to sky-high food prices… huge swings in commodity prices, and are partly responsible for the explosion in our healthcare costs because they’re contributing to type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease, obesity…

The bottom line is that Obama gets it, and knows that a White House organic garden can be a terrific catalyst for change.

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Van Jones Wins Aspen Institute Environment Award for Individual Thought Leadership

| Sunday March 29th, 2009 | 0 Comments


More on Van Jones and the Aspen Institute:
Van Jones Chosen as Obama’s “Green Jobs Czar”
Van Jones to be Obama’s Special Advisor for Green Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
Van Jones’ Last Unvetted Speech
Green Collar Jobs: Van Jones on the Colbert Report
Aspen Institute Forum: Powering the Planet: Energy for then Long Run

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Weekly Green Business Wrap-Up

| Friday March 27th, 2009 | 1 Comment

Tide.jpgProctor and Gamble Doubles their 2015 Sustainability Goals With Bounce, Cheer, Zest and Luv(s), Procter and Gamble announced a commitment to double its per-unit reduction targets for greenhouse gas emissions, waste generation and water and energy consumption by 2012 from 10% reductions to 20%, as part of an effort to make its environmental goals more robust. Swiffer!
blog-landfill-new.jpgGross! National Trash? Joel Makower has a feature this week on the importance of developing a metric for measuring our national trash production… mm-hmm… Gross National Trash.
wood%20pallets.JPGThree Big Businesses Say Good-Bye to Wooden Pallets Tropicana,Gatorade, and Quaker have all committed to recyclable plastic pallets. While that doesn’t seem like a big deal from an environmental point of view, the plastic pallets are 30% lighter than wood, reducing the carbon impact of the shipment, and when they get banged up, they can be recycled directly into new pallets– no downcyling! Side business benefits of the switch include: fewer lost shipments (the plastic pallets are embedded with RFID tags to monitor shipments) and fewer refused shipments because there are fewer safety hazards like exposed nails and broken wood.
Verizon Jumps on Energy Management Bandwagon With it’s routers already in your home, Verizon has realized that they have a ready entry into the energy management business. They’ll soon be able to broadcast information about your energy usage as well as power your devices off remotely. Next, I would like them to fix it so my mother and I an have fewer one way conversations due to dropped calls.
think-electric-car.jpgToyota Starts Hybrid Price War With the economy in shambles and car buyers looking sheepishly at their bank accounts when considering a hybrid purchase, Toyota announced this week that it is developing a low-cost hybrid version of the Yaris, designed to directly compete with the Honda Insight.
Finally, here at 3P we had a busy week! We covered AT&T’s holistic approach to sustainability
, Exxon’s environmental improvements in the 20 years since the 1989 oil spill, a London utility company offering carbon bonuses to employees, and whether or not “sustainable golf course” is an oxymoron.
Until next week!

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Overcoming the Coal Conundrum

Richard Levangie | Friday March 27th, 2009 | 0 Comments


Researchers at North Carolina State University think we should head back to the future – that wood might be able to replace coal, as the world’s primary energy source, just as coal once replaced wood. The NC State researchers are part of a team that is using a process called torrefaction to turn woodchips into a new fuel that is greener, cleaner and more efficient than burning coal. And, as Triple Pundit readers know, coal is the dirtiest source of energy on the planet. NASA climate scientist James Hansen says that reducing the use of coal must be our number one priority if we’re to save the planet.
During torrefaction, woodchips go through a machine – an industrial-sized oven – that toasts the biomass to remove any moisture. The chips are physically and chemically altered in this low-oxygen environment to make them drier and easier to crush, so they retain 80% of wood’s energy content, but just one-third of the weight, making them an ideal feedstock for power utilities that traditionally burn coal.

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Office Vampires: Millions of Office PCs Feed at Night

| Friday March 27th, 2009 | 0 Comments

Energy%20vampire.jpgVampire energy loss describes the considerable amount of energy sucked up by computers, home electronics and appliances that go into sleep or standby mode when you’re not using them. In the home, these Vampires represent between 5 and 8 percent of a single family home’s total electricity use per year, according to the Department of Energy.
The problem is multiplied many times over in offices in the US and around the world according to an international study released this week by 1E and the Alliance to Save Energy. The study found nearly half of US workers who use a PC at their job do not typically shut down at night. The 2009 PC Energy Report, which examines workplace PC power consumption in the US, UK and Germany, estimated that US organizations waste $2.8 billion a year to power 108 million unused machines. In 2009, the fossil fuels burned to power these unused PCs are expected to emit approximately 20 million tons of carbon dioxide, roughly the equivalent impact of 4 million cars.

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You Can’t Create Social Good Without Taking Social Actions

| Friday March 27th, 2009 | 3 Comments

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One of the reasons cause branding campaigns work so well is because it allows consumers to make doing good part of their regular routine. Someone can buy a cup of coffee and feel a sense of purpose without having to do any extra leg work. This ease of giving is magnified by Social Actions, a website that has aggregated literally thousands of charitable organizations and programs to connect users with causes, groups, and volunteer activities. Through a sophisticated database, users can access a multitude of resources designed to link them with opportunities for taking action without having to labor over research to find the right charity or how to get involved. Harnessing the power of social media and open source technology, Founder, Peter Deitz has made taking social actions as simple and targeted as a Google search with results as far-reaching as your desire to change the world.

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Did Apollo Alliance Influence the Stimulus?

Gina-Marie Cheeseman
| Friday March 27th, 2009 | 3 Comments

recovery-doc.gifLabor and environmental groups used to be on opposite sides. However, those days are long gone, according to a recent report, High Road or Low Road: Job Quality in the New Green Economy. The report mentions the 2004 creation of an alliance of labor, environmental groups, business, and social justice leaders called Apollo Alliance. The same year Apollo Alliance was formed it released a report that called for a ten-year investment in a “clean energy, good jobs” economy.
In December, the Apollo Alliance released its recommendations for an economic recovery act, calling it the Apollo Economic Recovery Act (AERA). The Alliance released the Act in response to Obama’s call a week before for a “big stimulus package.”

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In Search of the Eco-Friendly Golf Course

| Friday March 27th, 2009 | 8 Comments

Here’s a fun experiment: go to your favorite deep-green environmentalist friend and say the phrase “sustainable golf course.” You’re likely to be subjected to at least half an hour of explanations about why golf is inherently unsustainable. Or maybe you’re the deep-greenie questioning the existence of the mythic green golf course–you’ve probably heard references in passing to such a creature, but you don’t really believe it exists. After catching wind of a golf course in Panama that is pushing its sustainability as a main selling point, I decided that it was worth finding.

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SF Mayor Pushes to Increase Energy and Green Jobs Program by $4 Million

Mary Catherine O'Connor | Thursday March 26th, 2009 | 0 Comments

sfe-greenlogo.gifSan Francisco’s family-owned Lombardi Sports has been selling sporting gear for more than 50 years, inspiring the city’s active citizens to get outside. But with the help of the SF Energy Watch program, the company recently turned its attentions to an inside activity: improving the energy efficiency of its 50,000 square-foot Polk St. store. In the process, Lombardi’s lowered its monthly energy bill by $3000.
SF Mayor Gavin Newsom found the Lombardi store a fitting place to announce plans to expand the energy efficiency program today. He introduced a resolution at the Board of Supervisors this week to increase funding for the SF Environment Department program by $3.7 million. This would bring the total invested in the program to nearly $18 million. The money for SF Energy Watch comes from a percentage of Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) ratepayer bills.

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Top 7 Reasons Why This Recession Is a Great Time to Start a Green Business

Scott Cooney | Thursday March 26th, 2009 | 7 Comments

newgreenbusinessShiraGolding.jpgWhile counterintuitive, a recession is actually a terrific time to start a business. Sure, credit is tight, and venture capital is definitely hard to come by, so startup ideas requiring large amounts of up-front capital are perhaps best left to the drawing board for the moment. But for many entrepreneurs with a dream, startup capital requirements are small, and other elements of the economic outlook are very favorable.

As far as timing, for most businesses, it simply takes time for their product, service, or brand to become recognized, trusted, and sought after. Estimates vary widely, but it is simply a truth that average customers have to see your product or company several times before they make a purchase. This makes a recession a great time to get your name out there while most other companies are cutting back and the competition for people’s attention is less. Your company will be in good shape when the economy rebounds.
So while recessions can be a good time, and historically have been a good time for businesses to get their start, this particular recession is a great time to start a green business. Here’s why:

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National Grid Is Offering Carbon Bonuses to Execs

Richard Levangie | Thursday March 26th, 2009 | 0 Comments


In the wake of the AIG scandal, it’s refreshing to see that some companies are tying company bonuses to significant achievements for both the corporation and society. National Grid- a London – based utility company – has has become the latest and biggest UK firm to link the company’s success in reducing its carbon footprint to executive remuneration packages. The company will also implement carbon budgets across its entire operations starting next month, and incorporate the cost of compliance within those budgets.
If you can’t measure it, you can’t cut it, so National Grid has been conducting a detailed greenhouse gas emissions inventory over the last 12 months to provide senior management with the tools to track each division’s carbon footprint, and take the steps necessary to improve the overall environmental performance. Although the remuneration committee still hasn’t decided what weight to give carbon reductions in compensation packages, a National Grid spokeswoman expects that it will become an increasingly important metric.

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What Does “Green Cell Phone” Really Mean?

| Thursday March 26th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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If I offered you a “green” cell phone for sale, what would you expect? Would you expect it to be made with recyclable or biodegradable thermoplastics? Would you expect it to come with a minimum of toxic heavy metals, or low-strength radio waves? What about the programs on it – would you expect the phone to tell you how to live a “greener” lifestyle?
Or would you think I was just schlocking another flip phone painted some ugly green color?

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Lifecrete: Genuine Eco-Masonry for Your Home and Office

| Thursday March 26th, 2009 | 2 Comments

lifeblock.png Gone are the days that we have to use toxic ingredients to build our homes and work-spaces. Lifecrete offers a new alternative for construction materials, one that ticks the boxes on the sustainability front for both a product and business model. But what does Lifecrete offer to make this choice attractive for builders and consumers?
In today’s building industry, going ¬®green¬® is paramount. In 2007, the National Association of Home Builders reported that 90% of builders incorporated green elements into their projects, reflecting a trend that we all want to live — or at least strive to live — more sustainable lives. But much of the green elements incorporated into construction are secondary aspects, such as solar panels, water management systems, or energy-saving white goods, and little has been done regarding the actual building shell.
As well, many green construction products are damaging to the environment, using the tag ¨energy efficient¨ to grab consumer attention but utilizing such elements as toxic plastic sealers, chemical conditioners, Styrofoam, and traditional concrete, which is a major contributor to greenhouse gas. LifeCrete changes this trend, bringing to the market an affordable choice in masonry, the LifeBlock, that is a genuinely green product.

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