Net Impact 2008: Interview with Cleantech Investor Joyce Ferris

Net Impact | Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

Joyce Ferris is a managing director of Blue Hill Partners (her bio can be found here). She will be a part of the panel for “Early Stage Financing for Clean Tech” on Friday during the Net Impact North America Conference.
When reading through the Blue Hill website, one thing in particular caught my eye. I’ve looked through more than 50 cleantech private equity firms’ websites but haven’t seen anyone else with this type of strategy:

We concentrate in areas within the GreenTech sector and build investment ‘clusters’. To date, Blue Hill has built a cluster around energy efficiency technologies for application in commercial and industrial buildings and facilities. (link)

I asked Joyce to elaborate on her cluster strategy:

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Are the Girl Scouts a Social Enterprise?

| Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

SoCapConference.jpgWhat about WalMart? At a recent SoCap08 panel discussion on Market Creators, moderator Todd Johnson from Jones Day suggested the Girl Scouts of America and WalMart occupy the opposite ends of the continuum defining social enterprise. His opening remarks generated a few chuckles from the audience, and a few hisses when he mentioned WalMart, but he made his point. All successful strategies should be considered when evaluating what makes a sustainable mission-driven business.
“Start from a clean sheet” was also the message to those organizations who provide the investment infrastructure to the social enterprise sector; the panel included a sample of these organizations. Our current capital market system was not built in a day. And likewise, the emerging social capital market will require the development of an infrastructure and support system to “reduce friction, increase trust, and accelerate growth – from rating agencies to new legal structures to exchanges.”

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Recycled Glass Countertops Take Home CleanTech Award

| Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

BottleStoneRecycledCountertop.jpg As GreenBiz reported on Tuesday, the 2008 CleanTech Open concluded earlier this week, showcasing some of the most exciting new innovations in the world of sustainability. Among the winners walking away with a prize package worth $100,000 in cash and business resources was BottleStone, a Los Altos Hills company that makes ceramic stone countertops out of recycled glass.
It takes about six wine bottles to create a square foot of BottleStone, which is a wonder to think used wine bottles do more than to serve as evidence of one’s drinking habits. What’s more interesting is BottleStone’s durability. In tests, the material proved to be just as strong as 1.5″ thick brick or 2.5″ thick concrete paver.

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Net Impact 2008: Interview with Cleantech Investor Tucker Twitmyer

Net Impact | Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

I recently interviewed Tucker Twitmyer, a managing director of EnerTech Capital (his bio can be found here). Tucker will be a part of the panel for “Early Stage Financing for Clean Tech” on Friday during the Net Impact North America Conference.
We spoke briefly about oil prices and EnerTech’s reactions to recent drops in oil prices. Many cleantech investments require oil at recent prices ($80+) in order to be competitive, but apparently EnerTech isn’t worried.

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The Truth about Breaking the Bottled Water Habit and Green Jobs

3p Contributor | Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

bottled%20water.jpgThe term “green jobs” has been tossed around quite a bit this seemingly campaign season. While we may not all see eye to eye on plans for growing the green job market, we can agree that green jobs – jobs that serve a dual purpose of strengthening the U.S. economy while combating climate change and other environmental ills – are a critical step towards achieving both environmental and economic sustainability.
Like the majority of Americans, we are concerned about the state of our national economy (and, in turn, our impact on global markets). The assertion that we must learn to live sustainability, in all senses of that term, has never rung truer that it does right now. Simply put, our nation’s disposable, consumerist culture cannot be sustained. It’s time for not just more, but more of what matters.

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Note to U.S. Multinationals: Be American, Produce in America

Gina-Marie Cheeseman
| Thursday November 13th, 2008 | 0 Comments

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Last month Business Week calculated that consumers borrowed and spent about $3 trillion over the last decade, “consumption that was not justified by income growth.” Economic growth in the U.S. over the same period averaged 2.7 percent, the slowest rate since the 1950s. Personal consumption growth continued to grow while the rest of the U.S. economy declined, as the graph shows, which appeared in a 2008 Business Week article shows.
Michael Mandel, the chief economist for Business Week, believes that two things need to happen to “get the economy off the slow-growth track.” First, the private sector must concentrate on generating more productivity gains at home. U.S. multinational corporations moved many of their operations to other countries, which “created an unsustainable situation in which the U.S. had to keep borrowing from overseas to buy the goods made overseas.” Perhaps the old slogan “be American, buy American” needs to be revised to “be American, produce in America.”

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IEA Warnings are Old News for Renewable Energy Advocates

Jeff Siegel | Wednesday November 12th, 2008 | 0 Comments

The much anticipated International Energy Agency (IEA) report was released today, and basically told the world exactly what renewable energy advocates have been screaming from the rooftops for the past decade – energy demand is rising dramatically, and massive investment in new energy infrastructure development is an absolute necessity.
The IEA expects demand for oil to rise from 85 million barrels per day to106 million barrels per day by 2030. And in order to keep pace with demand, the agency noted that an energy supply investment of $1 trillion a year is necessary. That’s trillion – with a “T.”

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Dire Warnings of Oil Price Spike: Best Argument for Alternatives Yet

| Wednesday November 12th, 2008 | 0 Comments

feasta-gaspump.gifIt’s all over the news today: the International Energy Agency is warning that another spike in oil and gas prices is impending. The recent sharp drop in crude oil prices – thanks largely to purging of speculative demand for paper, exchange-traded oil contracts from hedge funds such as T. Boone Pickens’ BP Capital– is leading the world’s major oil and gas producers and refiners to cut back, if not zero out, their capital expenditure plans.
It seems that even the most flush, reserve-rich oil producers aren’t willing to invest in new exploration, production and refining at current prices, prices that are still 33% or more higher than they were before the liquidity-fed speculative bubble began shifting into oil and commodities several years ago. The effects of the banking and credit crisis is rippling through and resulting in recession, and prompting major oil and gas companies to drastically revise their capital spending plans downward. This as best revised forecasts are that energy demand will grow 1.6% per annum between 2006 and 2030.
If that’s not a strong argument for investing as much as possible now in the development of alternative, renewable energy resources I don’t know what is. If Saudi Arabia is having trouble meeting its recently upgraded capital spending plans, can we expect that drilling and producing here in the US is going to yield even a small percentage as much oil, or as cheaply. Clearly not.
It looks like there’s going to be short-term pain across the energy sector – from the pump to the plug – in the short-term. “Drill, baby drill,” is no solution. It takes years to locate and bring oil and gas resources into production, just tightens the ties that bind our energy and economic system, as well as foreign policy, to foreign oil and gas. That means our military personnel and arms will continue to our biggest export as we will have to continue to send them abroad to defend our energy exporting allies and intercede in local conflicts and politics.
Add to that the very real and enormous costs and risks of climate change and environmental degradation and it seems clear that we’re behind the curve when it comes to developing renewable energy resources and upgrading power infrastructure, fuel distribution networks and fleets of low carbon or emissions free vehicles, as well as a new generation of rail and other mass transportation networks. And of course, that’s not to mention the benefits to national security, as well as savings in lives and financial cost, reduced military involvement in the Middle East, eastern Europe and Eurasia could yield.

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Greening the Black Car

| Wednesday November 12th, 2008 | 4 Comments

PlanetTranGreenTaxi2.jpgWhile NYC is having a hard time clearing the air when it comes to taxis, some claiming they’re not as safe as the 15 mpg relics common on the road now, Boston and San Francisco have a solid option that goes far beyond being a transportation service that’s replaced the black car with a green car.
But let’s start there. Just having a Toyota Prius do the hauling saves 700 gallons of fuel on 1000 fifteen mile trips, and nearly 14,000 pounds of emissions as compared to the usual Crown Vics, Lincoln Town Car (black car) and minivans that rule the roads these days.
Planet Tran takes it further, both in terms of convenience, environmental responsibility, and quantification of impact.

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New Carbon Protocol Targets Universities

| Wednesday November 12th, 2008 | 0 Comments

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Yesterday, American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), an organization of nearly 600 leading colleges and universities, released its own carbon protocol. Don’t we have enough of those, you might ask? There’s the Chicago Climate Exchange, the Voluntary Carbon Standard, CDM, the Gold Standard, Green-e, and the California Climate Action Registry has their climate action reserve. The thing is, all of these protocols just serve to make us all more confused, right? This protocol takes a different approach, offering university offset buyers a practical solution to the quandary of which offsets to buy.

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A Silver Lining in the Market Collapse: Social Capital

| Wednesday November 12th, 2008 | 0 Comments

silver-sunlit-clouds.jpgAmidst a free-falling roller coaster global economy, social capital is an encouraging bright spot. While traditional profit-driven capitalism has come into question, the social capital movement is budding, striving to do good and make money at once, shattering the traditional for-profit, non-profit dichotomy. I was a relative newbie at the first Social Capital Markets Conference (SoCap08) which took place last month in San Francisco and want to relay the encouraging vibe.

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Vanadium Battery Technology Makes Commercial Progress as a Storage Solution for Renewable Energy

| Tuesday November 11th, 2008 | 0 Comments

An industrial strentgh vanadium batteryProviding baseload power to the energy grid requires it be “dispatchable”, or available on demand, a significant advantage to fossil-fuel power sources. Smart grid development can help smooth out the expansion of renewable energy, but power storage is the means by which most experts see renewable energy expanding its role as a baseload power provider.

There are several ways to store power for later use during peak demand. Hydroelectric plants can draw on reservoirs to generate electricity, then pump some of the water back uphill during off-peaks times. Another method gaining some recognition is using compressed air for energy storage.

But of all the ways to store energy, batteries are still the most widely accepted. As Jim Kelly, senior vice president of transmission and distribution of Southern California Edison puts it, “For most of us right now, the real key to effective storage is batteries”.

There are several different battery technologies working their way through development and early commercialization, but one technology showing some real promise in stabilizing energy distribution in renewable systems is the Vanadium Redox Flow battery.

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Postcard from Beijing: Insights into Walmart’s Sustainability Initiative

3p Contributor | Tuesday November 11th, 2008 | 0 Comments

walmart-china.jpgby Rick Bunch, Beijing, October 22: If there is such a thing as a tipping point, in the sustainability realm one has to believe it’s near at hand when 1000 CEOs (and Cameron Diaz – no kidding!) get in the same room to be jawboned by Walmart CEO Lee Scott. For those of us who have been in it for a while, the elation is quickly replaced by the pressure to make it all work so we’ll turn out to have been right.
Listening to Lee Scott [Walmart CEO] and other Blue-and-Gray executives, , I was genuinely impressed how far Walmart had come since announcing, a few months back, that it would bring its sustainability initiatives to China. At that time I was concerned that there was too little appreciation for differing political, legal, business and social cultures in China, and in particular that Walmart was poised to repeat many of the same mistakes that had recently laid low the food, medicine, toy and other industries that source from China. Many companies sourcing from China had imposed environmental, workplace and product-quality standards on their suppliers, supplemented by third-party audit and certification requirements, but a continuing series of scandals forcefully demonstrates these measures alone cannot succeed.
Walmart has figured out that setting standards and auditing supplier performance will not suffice. For one, suppliers are dealing with numerous conflicting social, safety, quality and environmental standards, and harmonization is needed among major buyers and associations. Even with regular audits, suppliers have a powerful incentive to cheat when buyers care only about price and delivery dates. On the one hand, Walmart proposes to mitigate the cheating incentive by sticking with suppliers who comply with standards and dropping those whose performance does not improve – regardless of cost. They are working with other major retailers and associations to harmonize supplier standards.

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Pepsi Ready To Switch To Plant Based Sweeteners

| Tuesday November 11th, 2008 | 7 Comments

Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo are reportedly readying their manufacturing units to replace artificial sweeteners in their beverages with an all natural sweetener called Stevia. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to give thumbs up this week to Stevia, a natural plant extract which has been in use for hundreds of years already in Latin America.

Cokes enriched with Stevia, also known as sweet leaf or sugar leaf, will have all the sweetness of sugar but none of the calories or carbohydrates, and a zero glycemic index. The plant, which already has holy grail status in the industry, will likely be adopted in many fizzy drinks and other beverages if it gets approved.

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Research forecasts rapid growth in Asia-Pacific Green IT marketplace

| Tuesday November 11th, 2008 | 0 Comments

rainforest.jpg The Asia-Pacific market for green IT services will expand at a compound annual growth rate of 68.5% between 2008 and 2011, from around $251 million in 2007 to some $2 billion, according to a recently released study by Springboard Research. According to the study, which excludes Japan, Australia presents itself as the largest, and key, market for green IT services during this period though India and China are forecast to grow at faster rates but from a smaller base.
According to Springboard’s “Asia Pacific Green IT Services Market – The Budding Greens,” consulting services capabilities are a key aspect in the market – expected to grow to $546 million– though infrastructure services make up some 58%, the largest single component, of the market.
“The key finding from our study is that consulting capability is an essential market entry point for vendors,” said Phil Hassey, Springboard vice president of services. “Green IT Services vividly highlights the need for service providers to have end to end capabilities, and to not rely upon a narrow set of capabilities if they are to capture market opportunities.”
Virtualization, data center management, recycling and enterprise-wide green IT strategies are the four key areas organizations are examining when it comes to greening IT.
While the green IT services market in the Asia-Pacific region is still “embryonic,” according to Springboard, HP-EDS and IBM have had success implementing end-to-end solutions. Other active participants include Sun, Dell, VMWare and Microsoft.
The key challenges that lie ahead involve vendors, customers, and governments being able to come together to craft practical, effective solutions and regulations. Vendors in particular “should ensure that their Green IT solutions are more than ‘window dressing’ of existing solutions – for a premium. Green IT adoption will not go into the mainstream until the vendors showcase clear cost savings and a transformational outcome to the enterprise users,” Hassey said.
For a broader and deeper look into what’s going on in Green IT, including how and why it will make it through the recession, check out Greener Computing’s current offerings.

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